Vida Académica?

Salud y Bienestar?

Desarrollo Social y Emocional

Las investigaciones demuestran que las personas que tienen buenas habilidades socio-emocionales prestan más atención y tienen menos problemas de aprendizaje. Además, suelen ser más exitosas en los ámbitos académicos y laborales. Al igual que las matemáticas o los idiomas, estas habilidades pueden enseñarse y desarrollarse con el paso del tiempo. 

¿Qué está buscando?

Conciencia de Sí Mismo

El autoconocimiento implica conocer tus emociones, fortalezas y desafíos, y saber cómo las emociones afectan tu conducta y decisiones.

smiling girl
Consejos

Ver más

classroom kid
Puntos de Referencia

Ver más


Recomendado

Sad Girl

Nombrarlo, Domarlo: Identificar las Emocione

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1jogvnM
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1LaMRvj
BODY <p>Did you know that learning to identify emotions can help your child build relationships and manage their emotions? In this video, you’ll learn to build your child’s emotional vocabulary at any age. </p>
BODYES <p>&iquest;Sab&iacute;a usted que aprender a identificar las emociones puede ayudar a que su hijo sepa manejar sus emociones y tambi&eacute;n construir buenas relaciones? En este video aprender&aacute;s como desarrollar el vocabulario emocional de su hijo en todas las edades.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-10-06 16:59:36.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:31.65
DESCRIPTION Did you know that learning to identify emotions can help your child build relationships? Learn to build your child’s emotional vocabulary at any age.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on learning how to identify emotions and building your child's emotional vocabulary.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141589159?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141591621?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" height="281" width="500" frameBorder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/141589159
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/141591621
FACEBOOKTEXT Did you know that learning to identify emotions can help your child build relationships? Learn to build your child’s emotional vocabulary at any age.
FACEBOOKTEXTES ¿Sabía usted que aprender a identificar las emociones puede ayudar a que su hijo sepa manejar sus emociones y también construir buenas relaciones? En este video aprenderás como desarrollar el vocabulario emocional de su hijo en todas las edades.
LABEL Name it, Tame it: Identifying Emotions
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 26572AB0-6C6D-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-10-06 16:59:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Learning How to Identify Emotions
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Name it, Tame it: Identifying Emotions
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Learning How to Identify Emotions
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Did you know that learning to identify emotions can help your child build relationships and manage their emotions? Learn to build your child’s emotional vocabulary at any age by watching the Support Social & Emotional Development video series at ParentToolkit.com!
TEASERES ¿Sabía usted que aprender a identificar las emociones puede ayudar a que su hijo sepa manejar sus emociones y también construir buenas relaciones? En este video aprenderás como desarrollar el vocabulario emocional de su hijo en todas las edades.
TEASERIMAGE 1736C4B0-18D7-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Name it, Tame it: Identifying Emotions
TITLEES Nombrarlo, Domarlo: Identificar las Emocione
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Vídeo: En este video aprenderás como desarrollar el vocabulario emocional de su hijo en todas las edades.
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Did you know learning how to identify emotions can help your child? Learn more via @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09713-0793-7966-3CBC318C02159515
2 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D

Mother Daughter Walking and Talking

3 formas para orientar a un estudiante de secundario a encontrar el significado en ayudar al prójimo

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2flNyHp
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>What are college admissions officers looking for in the volunteering and service section of your student’s application?</p> <p>Turns out it’s not quantity or prestige, but rather, <em>meaning</em>.</p> <p>In fact, many educators and deans of admission at some of the country’s most selective schools contributed to or endorsed a report published last January by the <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/">Making Caring Common Project</a> at the Harvard Graduate School of Education: <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/20160120_mcc_ttt_report_interactive.pdf"><em>Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern For Others And the Common Good Through College Admissions</em></a>.</p> <p>Harvard Lecturer Richard Weissbourd was the lead author of the report. He says finding a sustained, meaningful service experience is something all young people should have, not just for college applications, but for life.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=DB033AA0-609E-11E6-A4B10050569A5318">RELATED: Adding Caring to Your Kids College Application</a></p> <p>As service and volunteering tend to be on the minds of many people during this time of year, here are three ways parents can encourage our kids to find meaningful ways to give back.</p> <p><strong>1. </strong><strong>Help your kid find their authentic voice and passions.</strong></p> <p>The first step is having a conversation, or more likely, many conversations, with your kid about what really makes them tick. Taking the time to listen to your kid is not only a great chance for bonding, but an opportunity to learn about the person they are becoming.</p> <p>“Let your kid take initiative,” Weissbourd says. “Help guide them, but listen to their input and what they have to say. Ask your child to imagine a variety of service experiences and how they fit into them.”</p> <p>There are countless service experiences that take many different forms, ideologies, political perspectives, and faiths. While sometimes it may seem like your student has to get involved in everything, it is really an exciting moment for your kid to discover what their values are, Weissbourd says. Taking a step back to recognize this will be extremely beneficial in the long run.</p> <p>“It’s a really important ethical parenting moment and you really have to come to terms with what’s important to you,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>We all want what’s best for our kids. Sometimes we dream they will attend the college we went to, or that they will have everything we didn’t, or they will love to volunteer at an organization we’re passionate about. But our expectations of our kids shouldn’t cloud our understanding of what they need to thrive, Weissbourd says.</p> <p>“Too often kids think about what colleges want and how do I fit that,” Weissbourd said. “Parents have to help kids find what works for them and fits them.”</p> <p><strong>2. </strong><strong>Look for quality in service opportunities over quantity.</strong></p> <p>This sentiment is entwined in so many aspects of life, and it remains true for service, too.</p> <p>“It’s not the number of activities you do, it’s the quality of engagement,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>One practical way to help your kid find their own quality service opportunities is to actually limit your child in the number of activities they take part in. Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">suggests</a> asking the questions: “Why is this activity meaningful to you? What goals does it achieve? What have you learned about yourself, others, and your communities?” These questions force your child to pick what is most valuable to them and to think about why that is.</p> <p>Another way to emphasize quality is to not think about college applications at all! Some parents may scoff at this idea, but it will actually benefit your kid to choose activities simply by what they are passionate about.</p> <p>Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">advises</a> parents to “Encourage your children to choose activities that they have a legitimate interest in—not those that they think admission officers will value.”</p> <p>Ironically, this is what ends up shining through the most on the college application, Weissbourd says.</p> <p>And an added benefit? When your child is more aware of their own passions and values, they will be so much more prepared for the college application process.</p> <p><strong>3. </strong><strong>Encourage your kid to find community with their service.</strong></p> <p>When engaging in service, use the model, “Do with, not for,” Weissbourd says. It is a slippery slope between service for the greater good, and service for appearance sake.</p> <p>“[As a culture] we have demoted concern for others, concern for the common good and ethical engagement in the college admissions process,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>Parents can help kids by encouraging their students to get involved in service that has a lot of diversity. Explain to your kids that you are not a “savior,” but rather forming community with people, often times different from yourself, for a greater cause.</p> <p>Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">says</a>, “Experiences in diverse groups are not only important for your children ethically and emotionally, but can enable your children to develop key cognitive skills, including problem-solving skills and group awareness, that are key to success in work and life.”</p> <p>And mostly importantly, talk to your kid about what makes working within a diverse community both challenging and rewarding.</p> <p>“Parents work hard to raise kind and empathetic kids,” Weissbourd says. “What’s challenging is to raise kids who are kind and empathetic to people outside of their immediate circle of concern. These service experiences play a big part in that. It can be a really meaningful rite of passage.”</p> <p> </p> <p><em>This piece is part of the Parent Toolkit’s Week of Giving. Click <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A17F9E20-516C-11E3-839E0050569A5318">here</a> to read more inspirational stories.</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Follow the Parent Toolkit on </strong><a href="http://bit.ly/2bQX6cp" target="_blank"><strong>Facebook</strong></a><strong>, </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/educationnation" target="_blank"><strong>Twitter</strong></a><strong>, and </strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/theparenttoolkit/" target="_blank"><strong>Instagram</strong></a><strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p>
BODYES <p>¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?</p> <p>No se trata de cantidad ni de prestigio, sino de significado.</p> <p>De hecho, muchos educadores y decanos de admisión en algunas de las instituciones más selectivas del país contribuyeron o respaldaron un informe publicado en enero por Making Caring Common Project de Harvard Graduate School of Education: Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern For Others And the Common Good Through College Admissions (Cambio de rumbo: Una preocupación inspiradora por el otro y el bien común a través de las admisiones universitarias).</p> <p>Richard Weissbourd, profesor de Harvard, fue el autor principal de este informe. Asegura que encontrar una experiencia de servicio sostenida y significativa es una vivencia que todos los jóvenes deberían tener, no solo para ingresar en una universidad, sino para su vida.</p> <p>Como el servicio y el voluntariado suelen estar muy presentes en la cabeza de muchas personas en esta época del año, aquí encontrarás tres formas en que los padres pueden incentivar a sus hijos a encontrar formas de ayudar que sean significativas.</p> <h4>1. Ayuda a tu hijo a encontrar su identidad y pasiones verdaderas.</h4> <p>El primer paso sería tener una conversación, en realidad, muchas conversaciones con tu hijo sobre lo que realmente le interesa. Tomarte el tiempo para escuchar a tu hijo no es solo una gran oportunidad de unión entre ambos, sino también la posibilidad de conocer en qué persona se está convirtiendo.</p> <p>“Deja que tu hijo tome la iniciativa”, sugiere Weissbourd. “Oriéntalo, pero escucha lo que tiene para decirte. Pídele que imagine una serie de experiencias de servicio y cómo se vería en ellas”.</p> <p>Hay innumerables experiencias de servicio que toman diversas formas, ideologías, perspectivas políticas y creencias religiosas. Si bien, a veces, parece que tu hijo debe participar en todo, es un momento ideal para que descubra cuáles son sus valores, sostiene Weissbourd. Tomarse un tiempo para reconocer esto será extremadamente beneficioso a largo plazo.</p> <p>“Es un momento realmente importante en términos de ética en cuanto al rol de ser padre o madre, y debes tener en claro qué es relevante para ti”, agrega Weissbourd.</p> <p>Todos queremos lo mejor para nuestros hijos. A veces soñamos con que asistan a nuestra universidad, o que tengan todo lo que no tuvimos, o que les encantará trabajar como voluntarios en una organización que nos apasiona. Pero las expectativas que depositemos en nuestros hijos no deberían nublar nuestra opinión de lo que ellos necesitan para avanzar, comenta Weissbourd.</p> <p>“Los jóvenes suelen detenerse en lo que buscan las universidades y cómo podrían adaptarse a eso”, explica Weissbourd. “Los padres tienen que ayudar a sus hijos a encontrar aquello que funcione y se adapte a ellos”.</p> <h4>2. Busca calidad por sobre cantidad en las oportunidades de servicio.</h4> <p>Este concepto se entrelaza en innumerables aspectos de la vida, y el servicio no es la excepción.</p> <p>“No se trata de la cantidad de actividades que hagas, sino de la calidad del compromiso”, explica Weissbourd.</p> <p>Una manera práctica de ayudar a tu hijo a encontrar sus oportunidades de dar un servicio de calidad es limitar la cantidad de actividades en las que participa. Making Caring Common sugiere hacer estas preguntas: “¿Por qué esta actividad es significativa para ti? ¿Qué objetivos cumple? ¿Qué aprendiste de ti, de otros y de tus comunidades?”. Estas preguntas obligan a tu hijo a elegir aquello que sea más valioso para él y a pensar en por qué lo es.</p> <p>Otra forma de enfatizar la calidad es no pensar en las solicitudes universitarias. Algunos padres podrían reírse de esta idea, pero así tu hijo podrá elegir actividades solo teniendo en cuenta lo que le apasiona.</p> <p>Making Caring Common les aconseja a los padres que “incentiven a sus hijos a elegir actividades en las que tengan un interés legítimo, no aquellas en las que creen que valorarán los responsables de las admisiones”.</p> <p>Irónicamente, esto es lo que termina destacándose en las solicitudes universitarias, describe Weissbourd.</p> <p>¿Otro beneficio? Cuando tu hijo es más consciente de sus pasiones y valores, estará mucho más preparado para el proceso de admisión universitaria.</p> <h4>3. Incentiva a tu hijo a encontrar a su comunidad en el servicio elegido.</h4> <p>Cuando elija un servicio, ten presente la frase “Haz con, no por”, sugiere Weissbourd. Hay una línea muy delgada entre involucrarse en un servicio para el bien común o hacerlo por las apariencias.</p> <p>“[Como cultura] hemos menospreciado el valor de la preocupación por el otro, por el bien común y por el ejercicio ético en el proceso de admisiones universitarias”, afirma Weissbourd.</p> <p>Los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos estimulándolos a que participen en actividades que tengan que ver con la diversidad. Explícale a tu hijo que no eres un “salvador”, pero sí que formas parte de una comunidad con personas que suelen ser diferentes a ti y que se unen por una causa mayor.</p> <p>Making Caring Common agrega: “Las experiencias que tu hijo pueda vivir en grupos diversos no solo son importantes desde una óptica ética y emocional, sino que pueden ayudarlo a desarrollar habilidades cognitivas clave, como la capacidad de resolver problemas y tener conciencia de grupo, fundamentales para triunfar en el trabajo y en la vida”.</p> <p>Y, lo más importante, habla con tu hijo de lo desafiante y gratificante que resulta trabajar dentro de una comunidad diversa.</p> <p>“Los padres se esfuerzan para criar jóvenes generosos y empáticos”, considera Weissbourd. “El desafío está en criar jóvenes que sean generosos y empáticos con las personas que están fuera de su círculo más cercano. Estas experiencias de servicio tienen un rol muy importante al respecto. Pueden ser un ritual de transición de vital importancia”.</p> <p><em>Este artículo es parte de la sección Week of Giving de Parent Toolkit. Haz clic aquí para leer otras historias inspiradoras. </em> </p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,03CEEDAC-5056-9A4B-6C55C606D8A092FF,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
CMLABEL 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:52.363
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:28:25.39
DESCRIPTION Volunteering and service may help with college applications, but it enhances lives.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit on how to help high schoolers find meaning in service.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Here are some ways that you can help your high schooler find meaning in service:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0AA89B10-AD11-11E6-89870050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03CEEDAC-5056-9A4B-6C55C606D8A092FF
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-11-26 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER <p>As service and volunteering tend to be on the minds of many people during this time of year, here are three ways parents can encourage our kids to find meaningful ways to give back.</p>
SHORTTEASERES ¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Service looks good on a college application, but this Harvard educator explains why quality is the key.
TEASERES ¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?
TEASERIMAGE 4E7A7C10-1944-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
TITLEES 3 formas para orientar a un estudiante de secundario a encontrar el significado en ayudar al prójimo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Explore some ways you can help your high schooler find meaning in service:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

inside out movie

Más que una película: “Inside Out” y cómo hablar sobre las emociones

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1NIGpLF
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>If you haven’t heard already, there’s a new Pixar movie out called “Inside Out.” One of the great things about being a parent is the opportunity to include learning in everyday activities with kids – like seeing a movie together. “Inside Out” is an example of this. The movie offers ample opportunity to discuss with our kids the role of emotions in our lives. We get to experience the outside changes that are occurring in Riley’s life with a move to a new city and we experience what is happening in her brain at the same time. Anger, Sadness, Joy, Disgust and Fear are all personified as characters that hold the controls while she goes through her life’s adventures. Viewers can participate in major changes going on in Riley’s brain as she develops new ways of thinking as a tween-ager and lets go of some of her childhood memories. The movie raises important questions about how we perceive our emotions, how they impact the choices we make and ultimately the life we experience. It opens the door to dialogue at all ages if parents seize the chance. Here are some considerations as you experience and then reflect on the movie with your children. If you haven’t already seen the movie – spoiler alerts ahead!</p> <h4>Reflecting as a Parent</h4> <p>The movie reaches its climax with a powerful sadness when Riley loses some of her core happy memories. This speaks directly to a parent and child’s experience of developmental changes. We are elated, for example, when our toddler walks for the first time. But we often don’t discuss and perhaps bury or ignore the sadness that goes along with the milestone. I remember my child’s struggle to walk. There was endless cruising around furniture and falling down. I remember a room full of adults cheering on my toddler to work hard, “You can do it!” And I remember the pudgy baby face needing me then but not needing me as much after walking began. I do appreciate the muddy, bright seven year old standing in front of me. But I also remember every age and stage with both happiness and sadness. I miss the baby and the preschooler who will never return. And so part of truly understanding our child’s development is the acknowledgement that there is a letting go process and the sadness that goes with it.</p> <ul> <li> <p><em>Think of a significant developmental change in your child’s life. What emotions did you feel over those developmental changes?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>In what ways did you deal with sadness or other challenging emotions in that process?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>Can you think of other ways you could support yourself in anticipation of future changes?</em></p> </li> </ul> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">RELATED: Support your child's social and emotional development with our grade-by-grade guides.</a></p> <h4>Reflecting with Young Children</h4> <p>Though this movie depicts many intellectual concepts, such as the land of abstract thought where the feelings morph into two-dimensional figures as Riley’s thinking progresses, young children will view and understand it literally. They bring the asset of an expansive range for pretend thinking so they will appreciate the highly imaginative adventure. One seven year old described it this way, “I loved the movie but it was sad because the little girl loses her imaginary friend. There are little people who are in Riley’s mind who control how she feels.” Here are some questions I might ask a young child:</p> <ul> <li> <p><em>How did the movie make you feel? Sad? Excited? Joyful? Why did you feel that way?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>There were times of intense sadness. Why, do you think, Riley felt sad? Why did you feel sad?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>Do you remember when and how Riley began to feel better? How do you help yourself to feel better when you are feeling sad? Share some ideas like hugging a teddy bear or cuddling with Mom or Dad </em></p> </li> </ul> <h4>Reflecting with Middle School Children</h4> <p>Emotions play a significant role in tween-age children’s daily lives. Because it is a time of great transition, they may often feel misunderstood and retreat into their own world in order to deal with their changing perceptions, social environment and bodies. In the movie, Riley is twelve years old and her feelings of disappointment and disassociation with her parents may be a highly relatable theme for this age group. Use the viewing of this movie as a significant opportunity to achieve better understanding of your child’s hopes and challenges:</p> <ul> <li> <p><em>Riley, based on anger, disgust and fear, decided to run away but she fell into trouble and ended up back at home. What other choices did she have in that situation?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>What helps you when you are feeling misunderstood? Who will support you when you are sad? Or frustrated? Or hurt? Or angry?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>How can experiencing those feelings help you better understand friends and classmates? What perspectives might you share with them?</em><em> </em></p> </li> </ul> <h4>Reflecting with High School Teenagers</h4> <p>The theme in the toddler years is “I can do it myself.” That same theme returns in the teenage years paired with a lot more capability and autonomy. Though they may at times feel ready for adult-level decision making, teens logical brains have not yet fully developed. As a result, they need lots of dialogue to debate the ethics of situations and the consequences that may result. They need to be allowed to make low risk choices so that they experience for themselves the consequences and then talk about their thinking processes. Teens need to know that they can trust their parents to listen with open minds when they are ready to talk. Try asking the following of your teenage viewer:</p> <ul> <li> <p><em>When have you made a decision that has impacted all members of our family? How did you feel about the decision? How do you think we felt?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>What were the consequences? Did it help us grow in our relationships or did it hurt some of our relationships? If it hurt, how did we work on healing and moving on?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>How do you deal with your own strong feelings? What do you do to express them and then how do you cool down before making an important decision? </em><em> </em></p> </li> </ul> <h4>Parenting From the Inside Out</h4> <p>Becoming mindful of our own complex of emotions and how they affect our choices raises our self-awareness. If we intend to become models of emotional intelligence, then naming our emotions out loud and being honest about them is a good place to start. “How are you, Mom?” said E. “Oh I’m fine,” I sigh knowing that it’s a loaded sigh filled with much more than “fine.” If we are modeling self-awareness, we have to admit when we are sad, irritated, frustrated and more. And then, because we are held accountable to our emotions by our little ones looking up asking how we are, we must find ways to express those emotions constructively. “Mommy is feeling anxious. I’m going to sit and breathe for five minutes. Can you play quietly on the floor now? It will help me calm down.” In addition, we all have patterns from our own childhood that serve as our default mode if we are not thinking. So reflect on what behaviors you would like to keep and what you would like to change. Ask, “Do these actions truly align with the values and lessons I want my child to learn?” Raising your self-awareness can help you break unhealthy patterns and learn new, better ways of using your emotions as guides for compassion and growth. Take advantage of the opportunity this film has created to discuss the emotions we all have. It could give you insight into a world beyond your sight and deepen your self-compassion and empathy for your child.</p>
BODYES <p>Si todavía no estabas enterado, hay una nueva película de Pixar que se llama “Inside Out”. Ser padres nos permite hacer cosas maravillosas, por ejemplo, incluir el aprendizaje en las actividades diarias con los niños. ¿Cómo podemos hacerlo? Mirando una película juntos. “Inside Out” es un buen ejemplo. Esta película es la excusa perfecta para hablar con tus hijos sobre las emociones. Podemos experimentar los cambios exteriores que ocurren en la vida de Riley cuando se muda a una nueva ciudad y, al mismo tiempo, vemos lo que ocurre en su mente. Los sentimientos de Ira, Tristeza, Alegría, Desagrado y Temor están personificados y toman el control mientras Riley vive sus aventuras. Los espectadores participan en los grandes cambios que ocurren en el cerebro de Riley a medida que la preadolescente desarrolla nuevas formas de pensar y olvida algunos de sus recuerdos de la infancia. La película plantea importantes preguntas sobre cómo percibimos nuestras emociones, cómo influyen en las elecciones que hacemos y en la vida que vivimos; y abre la puerta al diálogo en todas las edades, si los padres aprovechan esta oportunidad. Estas son algunas reflexiones sobre la película para conversar con tus hijos. Si todavía no vieron la película, ¡alerta de spoilers!</p> <p><strong>Para reflexionar como padres</strong></p> <p>La película alcanza su punto culminante cuando, debido a una tristeza abrumadora, Riley pierde algunos de sus recuerdos felices primordiales. Este es un mensaje directo para los padres sobre cómo experimentan los cambios del desarrollo. Cuando nuestro bebé camina por primera vez estamos eufóricos, pero muchas veces no hablamos, o directamente ignoramos, la tristeza que acompaña este hito. Recuerdo cuando mi hijo estaba aprendiendo a caminar, su recorrido entre los muebles y las caídas. Recuerdo una ocasión en la que había varios adultos reunidos y todos los alentaban: “Vamos, ¡tú puedes!”. Y también recuerdo la carita regordeta de mi hijo, que me decía que en ese momento me necesitaba, pero al comenzar a caminar ya no me necesitaba tanto. Amo a este cochambroso y alegre niño de siete años que ahora está frente a mi, pero también recuerdo cada una de sus etapas de desarrollo con alegría y tristeza. Extraño al bebé y al nene de preescolar que ya no volverán. Para comprender verdaderamente el desarrollo de tus hijos debes aceptar que existe un proceso de desapego y la tristeza que eso acarrea.</p> <ul> <li><em>Piensa en un cambio del desarrollo significativo en la vida de tu hijo. ¿Qué emociones sentiste con respecto a esos cambios?</em></li> <li><em>¿Cómo lidiaste con la tristeza u otras emociones durante ese proceso?</em></li> <li><em>¿Se te ocurren otras formas en las que puedes prepararte para futuros cambios?</em></li> </ul> <p><strong>Para reflexionar con los niños pequeños</strong></p> <p>Aunque en esta película se muestran varios conceptos intelectuales, como la habitación del pensamiento abstracto, donde los sentimientos se transforman en figuras bidimensionales a medida que los pensamientos de Riley progresan, los niños más pequeños los verán e interpretarán de manera literal. Ellos cuentan con su capacidad ilimitada de pensamiento imaginativo y por eso les gustará mucho esta aventura. Un niño de siete años la describió diciendo “Me encantó la película, pero fue muy triste porque la niña pierde a su amigo imaginario. Y hay personas chiquitas en la cabeza de Riley que controlan lo que ella siente”. Estas son algunas preguntas que puedes hacerle a tus hijos más pequeños:</p> <ul> <li><em>¿Cómo te sentiste? ¿Triste? ¿Emocionado? ¿Alegre? ¿Por qué te sentiste así?</em></li> <li><em>Hay momentos muy tristes. ¿Por qué crees que Riley se sentía triste? ¿Por qué te sentiste triste?</em></li> <li><em>¿Recuerdas cuándo y cómo Riley comenzó a sentirse mejor? ¿Qué haces tú para sentirte mejor cuando estás triste? Comparte algunas ideas, como abrazar a un osito de peluche o acurrucarse con mamá o papá.</em></li> </ul> <p><strong>Para reflexionar con los niños de escuela intermedia</strong></p> <p>Las emociones juegan un papel fundamental en la vida cotidiana de los preadolescentes. Como es una etapa de grandes transiciones, muchas veces sienten que nadie los entiende y se encierran en su propio mundo para poder lidiar con estos cambios en las percepciones, el entorno social y sus cuerpos. En la película, Riley tiene 12 años y sus sentimientos de decepción y disociación con sus padres pueden ser un tema con el que este grupo etario puede sentirse identificado. Aprovecha esta película para poder comprender mejor las esperanzas y los desafíos de tus hijos:</p> <ul> <li><em>Guiada por la ira, el desagrado y el temor, Riley decide huir pero se mete en problemas y regresa a su casa. ¿Qué otras opciones tenía ante esa situación?</em></li> <li><em>¿Qué cosas te ayudan a ti cuando sientes que nadie te entiende? ¿Quién te consuela cuando estás triste o te sientes frustrado, o dolido, o enojado?</em></li> <li><em>¿Cómo crees que experimentar esos sentimientos te ayuda a entender mejor a tus amigos y compañeros de clase? ¿Qué perspectivas compartirías con ellos?</em></li> </ul> <p><strong>Para reflexionar con los adolescentes de la escuela secundaria</strong></p> <p>En la etapa durante la cual los niños aprenden a caminar, lo que predomina es el “Yo puedo hacerlo solo”. Y lo mismo ocurre durante la adolescencia, pero combinado con mayores habilidades y autonomía. Aunque muchas veces creen que están listos para tomar decisiones al nivel de un adulto, el razonamiento lógico de los adolescentes todavía no está desarrollado completamente. Debido a esto, el diálogo es fundamental para debatir los alcances éticos y consecuencias de una situación. Los adolescentes necesitan tomar decisiones de bajo riesgo, de manera que puedan experimentar por sí mismos las consecuencias y luego hablar sobre sus procesos de pensamiento. Necesitan saber que pueden confiar en sus padres, y que ellos los escucharán con la mente abierta cuando estén listos para hablar. Prueba con estas preguntas:</p> <ul> <li><em>¿En qué momento has tomado una decisión que haya afectado a todos los miembros de nuestra familia? ¿Cómo te sentiste con esa decisión? ¿Cómo crees que nos sentimos nosotros?</em></li> <li><em>¿Cuáles fueron las consecuencias? ¿Nos ayudó para crecer en nuestra relación o afectó nuestras relaciones? Si fue así, ¿cómo superamos ese momento?</em></li> <li><em>¿Cómo lidias con tus emociones más intensas? ¿Cómo las expresas y cómo te aplacas antes de tomar una decisión importante?</em></li> </ul> <p><strong>Consejos para padres</strong></p> <p>Ser conscientes de nuestras emociones y cómo afectan nuestras elecciones nos permite desarrollar el conocimiento de nosotros mismos. Si tratamos de convertirnos en modelos de inteligencia emocional, poder identificar nuestras emociones y ser honestos con respecto a ellas es un buen comienzo. “¿Cómo estás, mamá?” preguntó E. “Oh, bien”, respondo suspirando, pero sabiendo que es un suspiro cargado de significado que involucra mucho más que un “bien”. Si estamos moldeando la conciencia de uno mismo, tenemos que admitir cuando nos sentimos tristes, enojados, frustrados, etc. Y luego, como somos responsables de nuestras emociones y nuestros hijos nos preguntan cómo estamos, debemos encontrar formas de expresar esas emociones de manera constructiva. “Mamá se siente un poco ansiosa, me voy a tomar un momento para hacer ejercicios de respiración. ¿Pueden jugar tranquilos por un rato? Me ayudará para poder calmarme”. Además, todos tenemos patrones que traemos desde nuestra infancia y que sirven como modo predeterminado cuando no estamos pensando. Debemos reflexionar sobre qué conductas deseamos mantener y cuáles nos gustaría cambiar. Pregúntate, “¿estas acciones se condicen con los valores y lecciones que quiero que mis hijos aprendan?” Desarrollar la conciencia de uno mismo puede ayudarte a romper con patrones poco saludables y aprender nuevas y mejores formas de usar tus emociones como guías para la compasión y el crecimiento. Aprovecha las oportunidades que esta película te presenta para discutir sobre las emociones que todos sentimos. Te permite alcanzar un mayor entendimiento del mundo que está más allá de lo evidente y profundizar la compasión hacia uno mismo y la empatía por tu hijo.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204
CREATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:31.98
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:10:12.87
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL More Than a Movie: The Parenting Opportunity of “Inside Out”
LASTUPDATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 91559490-1F39-11E5-959C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC [empty string]
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-07-06 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER If you haven’t heard already, there’s a new Pixar movie out called “Inside Out.” The movie offers ample opportunity to discuss with our kids the role of emotions in our lives.
TEASERES Ser padres nos permite hacer cosas maravillosas, por ejemplo, incluir el aprendizaje en las actividades diarias con los niños. ¿Cómo podemos hacerlo? Mirando una película juntos.
TEASERIMAGE A44D56A0-23C9-11E7-88EA0050569A4B6C
TITLE More Than a Movie: The Parenting Opportunity of “Inside Out”
TITLEES Más que una película: “Inside Out” y cómo hablar sobre las emociones
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D

mom daughter high five

Elogios buenos y elogios malos

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/Kxou0z
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Research reveals that children who are repeatedly praised for their inherent intelligence, instead of being praised for their effort or the use of good problem-solving strategies, are at risk for the negative consequences of that praise. If your children feel that it is their intelligence you admire, they may over focus on the things that make them look intelligent, especially grades.</p> <p>Research by Carol Dweck, a Stanford University psychology professor, and others has shown that children who perceive their success to be the result of the intelligence with which they were born, and not qualities over which they have control, are more prone to what she called a fixed mindset. They believe that their abilities are fixed and not changeable by effort. This becomes problematic when they avoid opportunities to challenge themselves academically for fear of receiving a bad grade. When they are given a very hard assignment, they could lose confidence and give up because they do not believe their effort can impact their success. If a test seems very challenging, their fear of not getting a high grade could lesson their confidence and ultimately impair their performance.</p> <p>Children who are praised for grades, points scored in athletic events, or blue ribbons risk becoming perfectionists who choose not to participate. If their identities are so connected to an outcome, they can become fearful of disappointing you and of not living up to your high expectations. Instead of praising their results, focus on commending their progress, effort, attitude, strategic planning, organization, and prioritizing of work. This kind of feedback promotes the willingness to persevere and take on challenges.</p> <h4>Planning Your Praise</h4> <p><strong>Praise for effort:</strong> Praise that explicitly acknowledges the connection between children’s additional effort and their specific achievement, rather than praise for intelligence, increases their willingness to continue to apply effort and persevere through setbacks.</p> <p><strong>Specificity:</strong> It is not the quantity of the praise you offer, but the quality. The most effective praise is credible, specific, and genuine and relates to factors within your child’s control. Be specific about what it was that your child did that merits recognition. Instead of, “Your painting is pretty”, try a comment such as, “You blended colors well to show that the sun was setting.”</p> <p><strong>Avoid competitive praise:</strong> It is great to acknowledge your children’s improvement by comparing their progress to their previous challenges. “You seem to understand least common denominators much better now, and it shows in the way you can add fractions.” Avoid sarcastic or critical praise that negates their previous work such as, “This is such a careful, complete, and detailed report on spiders. Why didn’t you make your last report about the explorers this good?” If you’d like to help your child recognize the successful strategies they used on the spider report you could ask, “What strategies did you use to write such a complete and carefully illustrated report?”</p> <p><strong>Sincerity: </strong>Don’t praise your children for mediocre effort and work. Children know when they haven’t done their best and pick up on insincere praise. Children should not feel that you are lowering your standards to praise their work. It is better to wait for authentic success in effort or improvement than to give superficial praise for your children’s mediocre work.</p> <p><strong>Praise goals, but don’t make them contracts:</strong> If your child is enthusiastic and tells you of her plans to spend an extra 15 minutes reading each night beyond what the teacher assigns, it’s great to be supportive. You can even show you believe in her potential to achieve that goal with comments such as, “I’m glad you enjoy reading enough to want to do more. Would you like me to take you to the library tomorrow?” If some time goes by and your child does not stick to that goal, don’t make that a focus of criticism, which could cause her to regret that she shared her plans with you. Holding your tongue will encourage her to continue to have goals and share her dreams with you.</p> <p><strong>Praise that doesn’t embarrass modest children:</strong> Some children are uncomfortable with praise. You can make supportive comments that acknowledge their progress without using specific words of praise. “I notice that you are doing homework before watching television. How does it feel to finish your work earlier?”</p> <p>Praise that is specific, sincere, and related to effort and progress will set your children on the path to being lifelong learners who will enjoy challenges – and even seek them out. They will develop the belief that effort and perseverance are the keys to success. These children will be prepared for their future, will learn how to be creative innovators, and will take on the work needed to achieve their goals.</p>
BODYES <p>Las investigaciones demuestran que los niños que reciben elogios reiteradamente debido a su inteligencia, en vez de ser elogiados por los esfuerzos realizados o por el uso de buenas estrategias de resolución de problemas, corren grandes riesgos debido a las consecuencias negativas que acarrean esos elogios. Si tus hijos perciben que lo que admiras es su inteligencia, podrían concentrarse en exceso en las cosas que los hacen parecer inteligentes, especialmente las calificaciones escolares.</p> <p>La investigación realizada por la profesora de psicología de la Univerdad de Stanford, Carol Dweck, junto con otros colegas ha demostrado que los niños que perciben su éxito como el resultado de la inteligencia con la que nacieron, y no de las cualidades sobre las que tienen el control, son más propensos a tener una mentalidad cerrada, un esquema mental fijo. Creen que sus habilidades ya son fijas y no pueden cambiar, no importa el esfuerzo que se haga. Esto puede ser problemático cuando evitan las oportunidades de enfrentar retos académicos por temor a obtener una mala nota. Cuando reciben una tarea muy difícil pueden perder la confianza y darse por vencidos porque no creen que el esfuerzo pueda influir en su éxito. Si un examen les parece muy exigente, su temor a no obtener una calificación alta podría lesionar su confianza y, en última instancia, afectar su desempeño.</p> <p>Los niños que reciben elogios por las notas obtenidas, los puntos anotados en un evento deportivo o los premios recibidos corren el riesgo de convertirse en perfeccionistas que optan por no participar en ninguna actividad. Si su identidad está tan vinculada a un resultado, pueden tener miedo de decepcionarte y de no colmar tus expectativas. En lugar de elogiar sus resultados, alaba sus progresos, su esfuerzo, su actitud, la planificación estratégica, la organización y la priorización del trabajo. Este tipo de comentarios los alentará a ser perseverantes y a enfrentar los desafíos.</p> <h4>Planificación de los elogios</h4> <p><strong>Elogia el esfuerzo:</strong> felicitar a los niños expresamente por el esfuerzo realizado les permite reconocer la relación que existe entre el esfuerzo adicional realizado y el logro específico alcanzado. En vez de elogiar la inteligencia, incrementas su predisposición para continuar esforzándose y perseverar a pesar de los reveses.</p> <p><strong>Sé específico:</strong> no se trata de la cantidad de elogios que hagas sino de la calidad. Un elogio eficaz es creíble, específico y sincero, y hace referencia a los factores que están en la órbita de control de tu hijo. Debes ser específico sobre lo que hizo tu hijo y lo que amerita el reconocimiento. En vez de decirle “Tu dibujo es muy bonito”, intenta hacer un comentario del estilo “Combinaste muy bien los colores para mostrar que se está poniendo el sol”.</p> <p><strong>Evita los elogios competitivos:</strong> es muy bueno reconocer que tu hijo ha mejorado al comparar su progreso con el de desafíos anteriores. “Parece que ahora entiendes mucho mejor los denominadores comunes, se nota por cómo sumas las fracciones”. Evita los comentarios sarcásticos o críticos que invalidan sus esfuerzos anteriores, por ejemplo: “Este trabajo práctico sobre las arañas es muy completo y detallado, ¿por qué no hiciste lo mismo en el trabajo anterior sobre los exploradores?” Si quieres ayudar a tu hijo a identificar las estrategias exitosas que usó para su trabajo sobre las arañas, puedes preguntarle “¿Qué recursos usaste para hacer un trabajo práctico tan completo y con tantas ilustraciones?” Sé sincero: no elogies a tus hijos si el trabajo o el esfuerzo han sido mediocres. Los niños saben cuando no han hecho su mejor esfuerzo y reciben elogios que no son sinceros. No deben sentir que estás bajando tus niveles de exigencia para elogiar su trabajo. Es preferible esperar a conseguir un verdadero éxito con esfuerzo que hacer un elogio superficial al trabajo mediocre.</p> <p><strong>Elogia los objetivos, pero no los transformes en cargas:</strong> si tu hijo está entusiasmado y te cuenta que planea dedicar 15 minutos adicionales cada noche para leer un poco más de lo que la maestra les asignó, es genial que lo apoyes. Incluso puedes demostrarle que crees en su potencial para alcanzar ese objetivo diciéndole: “Estoy muy contento de que disfrutes de la lectura y quieras leer más. ¿te gustaría que te lleve a la biblioteca?” Si pasado algún tiempo tu hijo no mantiene ese objetivo, no lo conviertas en una crítica, porque podrías hacer que se arrepienta de haber compartido sus planes contigo. Mantener la boca cerrada será la mejor forma de alentarlo a plantearse nuevos objetivos y compartir sus sueños contigo.</p> <p><strong>Elogia pero no avergüences:</strong> algunos niños no se sienten cómodos al recibir elogios. Puedes hacer comentarios de apoyo que reconozcan su progreso sin usar palabras específicas de elogio. “Noté que haces tu tarea antes de ir a mirar la tele. ¿No es genial terminar de trabajar más temprano?” Un elogio que es específico, sincero y está relacionado con el esfuerzo y el progreso ayudará a encaminar a tus hijos para que disfruten del aprendizaje diario y para buscar nuevos desafíos y enfrentarlos. Desarrollarán el convencimiento de que el esfuerzo y la perseverancia son claves para el éxito. Estos niños estarán preparados para el futuro, aprenderán a ser innovadores creativos y harán lo que sea necesario para alcanzar sus metas.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,2B79154F-5056-9A4B-6C87F84E0C1D1F1F,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:05:17.607
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:52:34.243
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Good Praise, Bad Praise
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0A598840-7722-11E3-A4E20050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2014-01-06 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Parents often fall into pitfalls when praising their children for their performance. Check out this post from Dr. Judy Willis about some best practices for offering sincere praise.
TEASERES Si tus hijos perciben que lo que admiras es su inteligencia, podrían concentrarse en exceso en las cosas que los hacen parecer inteligentes, especialmente las calificaciones escolares.
TEASERIMAGE B0196630-23CA-11E7-88EA0050569A4B6C
TITLE Good Praise, Bad Praise
TITLEES Elogios buenos y elogios malos
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Autocontrol

El autocontrol es moderar las emociones y las conductas que ellas generan, a fin de superar los desafíos y alcanzar los objetivos.

guy on grass
Consejos

Ver más

group with book
Puntos de Referencia

Ver más


Recomendado

day dreamer girl

Ocho formas de ejercitar la conciencia plena con tu familia

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1QjSMy0
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>They can be some of the most frustrating and embarrassing child behaviors—temper tantrums, lashing out at others, impatience, and short attention spans. So what can you do about them?  Research has found that having a sense of mindfulness, or the ability to be present and think before reacting, can provide children with the skills they need to better understand their feelings, to pay more attention and to make wiser decisions. Mindfulness also means paying attention to the moment without judgment and intentionally pausing before reacting. Mindfulness is a wonderful way to help children manage their emotions, reduce their stress, improve their academics, and even develop greater empathy. The hidden benefit of practicing mindfulness <em>with </em>your family is that as parents you get to reap the benefits too. Here are eight easy ways to get started:</p> <p><strong>1. Take on a Family Mindfulness Challenge</strong>: When you model the mindfulness you want to see in your children, they understand it on a whole new level. So, give it a try. You can sit on a chair or floor with your back straight but not tense. Close your eyes and use your other senses, like listening. A simple minute of <a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/educational-resources/">mindful breathing</a> is one great way to start. There are also <a href="http://www.calm.com/">free apps and websites</a> available to help guide your practice, which can be great for beginners.</p> <p><strong>2. Choose a “Mindfulness Corner”:</strong> It could be in a bedroom or main area. Make it special and uncluttered. You can have everyone in your family put a personal symbol, like a pillow, photo or blanket, in the middle of the room so it becomes like a “zone of peace” that is there at any time. Designating a physical location literally “holds the space” for mindfulness to become a regular family habit, much like sitting down together to eat a meal.</p> <p><strong>3. Set a Time:</strong> Just like athletes schedule practice sessions to improve their skills, having a designated mindfulness time helps make it a go-to habit. Before bed is a wonderful time, as the mindfulness practice relaxes everyone into a more peaceful state. Some families use a special chime to take turns bringing everyone together. As your family gets used to practicing mindfulness, the special space in your home can serve as a good place to go when anyone in the family needs to take a break from anger, or frustration. If you practice moments of calm, it makes going to that space in moments of stress easier. </p> <p><strong>4. Have Mindful Mornings: </strong>Getting out the door for school is stressful. Consider ways to de-stress, like waking up a little earlier for some quiet time, or encouraging your children to help (as they can) to pack their lunches the night before. Dr. Christine Carter of <a href="http://greatergood.berkeley.edu">Greater Good Science Center</a> prepares for the morning rush by placing sticky notes on her fridge. They are reminders to NOTICE emotions, NAME the emotion, ACCEPT what is going on, and BREATHE (pausing to take a few deep breaths) before jumping into action.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=9214C140-32E9-11E4-AB0A0050569A5318">Check out our Parent's Guide to learn more about how to better manage your emotions.</a></em></p> <p><strong>5. Practice Mindfulness around the Table</strong>: Remember how good it feels to express gratitude at the Thanksgiving table? What if you could do this once a week? Schedule a time where everyone talks about what they are grateful for in their life and something they appreciate about others at the table. This is all about being in the moment and taking time to notice the good stuff (there’s always good stuff, even if it’s just a hot meal or the smile on your child’s face!). It will uplift everyone there.</p> <p><strong>6. Designate Mindful Boundaries: </strong>Having established boundaries promotes a feeling of consistency and safety. They provide a perimeter, within which children can exercise their autonomy. If the boundaries are mindfully thought out in advance, then there is less reason for you to constantly say no. It’s equally important to create situations where your child can experience autonomy (e.g., “You can be the leader on the hike.”). In <em>Mindful Discipline</em>, Dr. Shauna Shapiro makes the case that children need <em>both</em> boundaries and autonomy. Shapiro asserts that children need a degree of autonomy to develop a sense of responsibility over their lives. They also need clear boundaries, which gives them a sense of safety, and a clear idea of who is the parent and who is the child. The author suggests that you ask yourself, “What is most needed in this moment? Is it space, autonomy, or a boundary? Or maybe it’s some of each: you can run around the park, but here’s a line you can’t cross—a non-negotiable line.”</p> <p><strong>7. Be Mindful with Discipline: </strong>There’s no getting around it - discipline is part of parenting. Why not address it mindfully? If you see discipline as teaching, rather than confrontation, the first step is pausing enough to be mindful of what your child is feeling. In <em>No-Drama Discipline</em>, Dr. Dan Siegel and Dr. Tina Bryson suggest:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Communicate comfort so your child feels safe to open up. Get down to your child’s eye level, and put your hand on his arm or hug to give him a sense of reassurance.  You can also tell him, “It’s hard, isn’t it? Can you tell me about it?”</p> </li> <li> <p>Validate and say something like, “If I were in your shoes, at the same age, I might feel the same way.”</p> </li> <li> <p>Listen. Rather than lecture, breathe.</p> </li> <li> <p>Reflect. Say back what you hear like, “I understand that you’re upset because you don’t want to go to bed right now.”</p> </li> <li> <p>Redirect. After you understand what was happening internally to your child, you can determine what you want to teach and how best to do it. For example, you may want to say, “If you get your rest now you won’t feel tired at school tomorrow. Would you like to read one more book and then we can tuck you in so you can go to bed?”</p> </li> </ul> <p><strong>8. Share Your Experiences: </strong>The more you and your child practice mindfulness, the more natural it becomes. You will draw on it in all aspects of life. If you used mindfulness when you felt your emotions rising, (in traffic, at the office, with friends), and you were able to pause before reacting, share that experience with your child. Encourage her/him to do the same. You will inspire one another in ways you might not even imagine.</p> <p><strong><em>Randy Taran </em></strong><em>is the CEO and founder of<strong> </strong></em><a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/"><em>Project Happiness</em></a><em>, a global organization which </em><em>specializes in emotional resilience-building programs that are used by people of any age and endorsed by public schools, private institutions and universities in the U.S. and 90 countries around the world. Randy is also co-author of the Project Happiness </em><a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/the-book/"><em>Handbook</em></a><em> and producer of the award-winning </em><a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/host-a-screening/"><em>film</em></a><em> Project Happiness.</em></p>
BODYES <p>Pueden ser algunos de los comportamientos infantiles más frustrantes y embarazosos: berrinches, agresión a otras personas, impaciencia y breves períodos de atención. ¿Qué puedes hacer al respecto? Distintas investigaciones demostraron que desarrollar cierto sentido de conciencia plena, o la capacidad de estar presentes y pensar antes de reaccionar, puede brindarles a los niños las habilidades que necesitan para entender mejor sus sentimientos, prestar más atención y tomar mejores decisiones. El concepto de conciencia plena también se refiere a prestar atención al momento sin juzgar, y hacer una pausa intencional antes de reaccionar. Es una práctica maravillosa que puede ayudar a los niños a manejar sus emociones, reducir el estrés, mejorar su rendimiento académico y hasta desarrollar mayor empatía. El beneficio oculto de practicarlo <em>con</em> tu familia es que como padres también pueden aprovechar los beneficios. Aquí les dejo ocho formas sencillas para comenzar:</p> <p><strong>1. Ejercita la conciencia plena con tu familia:</strong> Cuando te conviertes en una especie de modelo de lo que te gustaría ver en tus hijos, lo reciben en un nivel completamente distinto. Inténtalo. Puedes sentarte en una silla o en el piso con la espalda derecha, pero no tensa. Cierra los ojos y usa tus otros sentidos, como el oído. Tan solo un minuto de <a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/educational-resources/">respiración consciente</a> es un excelente comienzo. También hay <a href="http://www.calm.com/">aplicaciones y sitios web gratuitos</a> que pueden ayudarte en tus prácticas, esto es ideal para los principiantes.</p> <p><strong>2. Elige un “rincón” para tus prácticas:</strong> Puede ser en un dormitorio o en un área común. Asegúrate de que sea especial y ordenado. Cada integrante de la familia puede dejar un objeto personal, como una almohada, una foto o una manta en el medio de la habitación para convertirlo en una “zona de paz” que estará allí en todo momento. Designar un espacio físico procura que este ejercicio se vuelva un hábito regular para la familia, como lo es el momento de sentarse a la mesa para compartir una comida.</p> <p><strong>3. Establece una hora:</strong> Así como los deportistas programan sus prácticas para mejorar sus habilidades, tener una hora designada ayuda a convertirlo en un hábito. Antes de acostarse es un momento ideal, ya que estos ejercicios los relajarán hasta alcanzar un estado más tranquilo. Algunas familias tienen un llamador especial para reunir a todos. A medida que tu familia se acostumbre a practicar la conciencia plena, ese espacio de tu casa puede servir como un buen lugar al que acuda algún miembro de la familia que necesite tomarse un respiro tras una situación de enojo o frustración. Si ejercitas momentos de calma, es más fácil que recurras a ese espacio en situaciones de estrés.</p> <p><strong>4. Aplícalo a la mañana:</strong> El momento antes de salir a la escuela es estresante. Piensa alguna forma para desestresarte, como despertarte un poco más temprano para tener un rato de tranquilidad, o pedirles a los niños que ayuden (como puedan) a envolver sus almuerzos la noche anterior. La Dra. Christine Carter del <a href="http://greatergood.berkeley.edu">Greater Good Science Center</a> se prepara para el caos de la mañana colocando notas adhesivas en el refrigerador. Son recordatorios para PERCIBIR las emociones, NOMBRAR las emociones, ACEPTAR lo que está pasando y RESPIRAR (hacer una pausa y respirar profundo) antes de lanzarse a la acción.</p> <p><strong>5. Practica la conciencia plena en la mesa:</strong> ¿Recuerdas lo bien que te sientes cuando expresas tu gratitud en la mesa de Acción de Gracias? ¿Qué pasaría si lo hicieras una vez por semana? Establece un momento en el que todos digan por qué están agradecidos en su vida y qué es lo que valoran de los demás. Solo se trata de estar presentes en el momento y de tomarse el tiempo para destacar lo bueno (siempre hay algo bueno, ya sea un plato de comida caliente o la sonrisa en el rostro de tu hijo). Todos se sentirán más animados.</p> <p><strong>6. Designa límites conscientes:</strong> Establecer límites genera una sensación de consistencia y seguridad. Brindan un perímetro, dentro del cual los niños pueden ejercer su autonomía. Si los límites son pensados a conciencia y con anticipación, habrá menos razones para que estés diciendo “no” constantemente. Igual de importante es crear situaciones en las que tu hijo pueda experimentar la autonomía (por ejemplo: “Tú serás el líder del paseo”). En <em>Mindful Discipline</em>, la Dra. Shauna Shapiro describe por qué los niños necesitan <em>tanto</em> límites <em>como</em> autonomía. Shapiro asegura que los niños necesitan cierto grado de autonomía para desarrollar un sentido de responsabilidad en sus vidas. También necesitan límites bien definidos, lo que les da un sentido de seguridad y una idea clara de quién es el padre y quién el hijo. La autora sugiere que te preguntes: “¿Qué se necesita más en este momento? ¿Espacio, autonomía o límites? O quizá un poco de cada uno: puedes correr por el parque, pero no puedes cruzar esa línea, una línea que no se negocia”.</p> <p><strong>7. Sé consciente con la disciplina:</strong> No hay vuelta que darle, la disciplina es parte de la tarea de ser padres. ¿Por qué no encararla de forma consciente? Si ves la disciplina como una enseñanza en lugar de una confrontación, el primer paso es tomarse un momento para ser conscientes de lo que siente el niño. En <em>No-Drama Discipline</em>, el Dr. Dan Siegel y la Dra. Tina Bryson sugieren:</p> <ul> <li>Transmitir comodidad para que tu hijo se sienta seguro al abrirse ante ti. Agáchate para estar a la altura de tu hijo, coloca la mano en su brazo o abrázalo para darle una sensación de confianza. También puedes decirle: “Es difícil, ¿no? ¿Me lo puedes contar?”.</li> <li>Validar sus emociones y decir algo de este estilo: “Si estuviera en tus zapatos, a la misma edad, me sentiría de la misma forma”.</li> <li>Escuchar. No des lecciones, respira.</li> <li>Reflexionar. Repite lo que oyes, como: “Entiendo que estás molesto porque no quieres ir a la cama ahora mismo”.</li> <li>Redireccionar. Después de haber entendido qué le pasaba internamente a tu hijo, puedes determinar qué le quieres enseñar y la mejor forma de hacerlo. Por ejemplo, podrías decir: “Si vas a dormir ahora, mañana no te sentirás cansado en la escuela. ¿Te gustaría leer un libro más? Luego te arroparé así estás listo para dormir”.</li> </ul> <p><strong>8. Comparte tus experiencias:</strong> A medida que tú y tu hijo practiquen más la conciencia plena, más natural será. Recurrirás a ella en todos los aspectos de tu vida. Si ejercitaste la conciencia plena cuando te sentías abrumado (en el tráfico, en la oficina, con amigos), y lograste tomarte un instante antes de reaccionar, compártelo con tu hijo. Aliéntalo para que haga lo mismo. Podrán inspirarse el uno al otro como nunca lo hubieras imaginado.</p> <p><em><strong>Randy Taran</strong> es CEO y fundadora de <a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/">Project Happiness</a>, una organización internacional que se especializa en programas de desarrollo de resiliencia emocional usados por personas de todas las edades y respaldados por escuelas públicas, instituciones privadas y universidades de los EE. UU. y otros 90 países de todo el mundo. Randy, además, es coautora del libro Project Happiness <a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/the-book/">Handbook</a> y productora de la premiada <a href="http://www.projecthappiness.org/host-a-screening/">película</a> Project Happiness.</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,03D8C832-5056-9A4B-6C28465592F5DE32,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:17.393
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:05:21.21
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Eight Ways to Bring Mindfulness into Your Family
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 9E405DF0-D896-11E4-AC210050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-04-06 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Teaching children to be more mindful can help them to better understand their emotions and manage their reactions.
TEASERES Pueden ser algunos de los comportamientos infantiles más frustrantes y embarazosos: berrinches, agresión a otras personas, impaciencia y breves períodos de atención.
TEASERIMAGE 34CD78E0-23C5-11E7-88EA0050569A4B6C
TITLE Eight Ways to Bring Mindfulness into Your Family
TITLEES Ocho formas de ejercitar la conciencia plena con tu familia
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 B1B746F0-D896-11E4-AC210050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

mom son hug

La perseverancia y la determinación se pueden enseñar

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1wOKZyk
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>“Years ago, I remember talking to a classmate before a test and hearing how much longer he’d studied for it than I had," says Tom Hoerr, head of the New City School in St. Louis. “I didn’t think much about it until the tests were returned a week later and I noticed the disparity in our scores. Mine was not higher. What I learned from that experience about the differences in how we had studied helped me understand why his grade was so much better. The idea that you can succeed by increasing effort caused me to step back and focus my energies. People might be smarter than I am, but they weren’t going to outwork me, I decided. I would persevere.”</p> <p>As illustrated in Tom’s story, the ability to persevere is necessary to develop a mind-set for success because no one, no matter how talented, achieves everything every time. Perseverance is a necessary skill for discovering new ideas, and experiencing setbacks or failures, redrafting, and re-planning are all necessary steps toward developing it. Perseverance enables us to take risks, learn from our failures, and forge ahead with new and better information.</p> <p>Typically, when we read a perseverance or grit success story, it often involves overcoming unbeatable odds or surviving dire circumstances. While these stories are compelling, they are not always relatable to the average person. It’s important that perseverance and grit are understood in more common circumstances because everyone, regardless of his situation, needs to develop these skills.</p> <p>Perseverance is a skill that can be taught. Although most of us learn it through trial and error, it can and should be taught, just like any other key skill or competency. Perseverance is the quality that allows someone to continue trying even in the face of difficulty, adversity, or impossibility. Grit is another important skill aligned with perseverance.</p> <p>Hoerr and his colleagues at the New City School have been working to incorporate grit in the classroom. To nobody’s surprise, Hoerr says, that’s not easy to do.</p> <p>“But if the focus is on preparing students to succeed in life, not just in school, it becomes clear that we need to be sure students learn to respond to adversity,” he adds. “The first step is being transparent about the need for grit. It should be part of the common vocabulary and readily discussed by teachers, students, and parents.”</p> <p>As parents, we should have frequent discussions with our children about the importance of these skills, and teach them to react constructively to a setback and then evaluate and re-plan if necessary. Here are some tips for fostering perseverance and grit in children, whether in the classroom, at home, or elsewhere:</p> <p><strong>- Regularly encourage children to try new things.</strong> You may also want to try something new with your child, like roller-skating or a new arcade or video game. No one is perfect at anything when they start, and this is a great way to show your child that falling down or not winning isn’t the end of the world.</p> <p><strong>- Adjust the degree of perseverance needed.</strong> If children need a small challenge, present one related to activities they already have ability in. If they need a bigger challenge, take them out of their prior-experience comfort zone.</p> <p><strong>- Share some instances when you’ve needed perseverance and grit to accomplish a difficult task. </strong>We don’t often talk about our earlier failures, so children sometimes think that adult successes all come with ease.</p> <p>- <strong>Be overt. </strong>Tell them that they are working on perseverance skills and let them know that struggle and failure are likely. Knowing that they are meant to struggle makes it much easier to deal with.<br /><br /><strong>- Be there for them when they do struggle or fail. </strong>Provide support, help them evaluate why things weren't successful, and guide them in determining how to replan and try again.<br /><br /><strong>- Encourage them.</strong> Don’t reward or congratulate them only for achievement. Recognize effort and perseverance as well.</p> <p>Everyone, regardless of one’s situation, needs to develop these essential skills. We can all benefit from having the ability to put forth the necessary effort and move forward after setbacks. By putting these skills into practice, your child will be better prepared to deal with challenges, to overcome obstacles, and to have the motivating force necessary to succeed in his endeavors.</p> <p><em>Sean Slade and Thomas Hoerr are members of NBC Parent Toolkit’s <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=85F54DC0-A3DE-11E3-9B840050569A5318">Social & Emotional</a> expert panel. Slade is director of Whole Child Programs at <a href="http://www.ascd.org/">ASCD</a> and coauthor of <a href="http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/Overview/School-Climate-Change.aspx">School Climate Change: How do I build a positive environment for learning?</a> (ASCD, 2014). Hoerr is head of the New City School in St. Louis, Mo., and has worked with his faculty to implement the theory of multiple intelligences since 1988. His most recent book is <a href="http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/Overview/Fostering-Grit.aspx">Fostering Grit: How do I prepare my students for the real world?</a> (ASCD, 2013). </em></p>
BODYES <p>“Recuerdo haber hablado hace algunos años con un compañero de clase antes de una prueba y notar que él había estudiado mucho más que yo”, comenta Tom Hoerr, director de la escuela New City School en St. Louis. “No me detuve mucho en esto hasta que nos devolvieron las pruebas una semana después y descubrí las diferencias en nuestras notas. La mía no era más alta. Lo que aprendí de esa experiencia sobre las diferencias en cómo habíamos estudiado me ayudó a entender por qué su nota era mucho mejor. La idea de que se puede tener un buen rendimiento esforzándose más me hizo detener un momento y focalizar mis energías. Otras personas pueden ser más inteligentes que yo, pero decidí que nadie se iba esforzar más que yo. Que sería una persona perseverante”.</p> <p>Como muestra la historia de Tom, la capacidad de perseverar es necesaria para desarrollar una actitud hacia el logro de objetivos porque nadie, no importa lo talentoso que sea, alcanza todo lo que se propone una y otra vez. La perseverancia es una habilidad necesaria para descubrir ideas nuevas y atravesar contratiempos o fracasos; recomenzar y reorganizarse son pasos necesarios para cumplir con nuestros objetivos. La perseverancia nos permite tomar riesgos, aprender de nuestros fracasos y seguir avanzando con nueva y mejor información.</p> <p>Por lo general, cuando leemos una historia de éxito basada en la perseverancia o en la determinación, suele estar relacionada con sobreponerse a estadísticas muy adversas o sobrevivir a circunstancias extremas. Si bien estas historias son atrapantes, no siempre se ajustan al promedio de las personas. Es importante entender a la perseverancia y a la determinación en circunstancias más frecuentes porque todos, sin importar nuestra situación, necesitamos desarrollar estas habilidades.</p> <p>La perseverancia es una habilidad que se puede enseñar. A pesar de que la mayoría de nosotros la aprende por medio de prueba y error, puede y debería enseñarse, al igual que cualquier otra habilidad o aptitud. La perseverancia es la cualidad que le permite a un individuo seguir intentando algo aun en contextos difíciles, adversos o imposibles. La determinación es otra habilidad importante que está alineada con la perseverancia.</p> <p>Hoerr y sus colegas de New City School han estado trabajando para incorporar la idea de determinación en la clase. Como es de esperar, Hoerr asegura que no es una tarea sencilla.</p> <p>“Pero si el foco está puesto en preparar a los estudiantes para triunfar en la vida, no solo en la escuela, queda claro que debemos asegurarnos que los estudiantes aprendan a responder ante la adversidad”, agregó. “El primer paso es ser transparente acerca de la necesidad de determinación. Debería ser parte del vocabulario general y tratado por maestros, estudiantes y padres”.</p> <p>Como padres, deberíamos conversar con nuestros hijos sobre la importancia de estas habilidades, y enseñarles a reaccionar en forma constructiva ante un contratiempo, y luego evaluar los motivos y reorganizarse si es necesario. Aquí encontrarás algunos consejos para promover la perseverancia y la determinación en los niños, tanto en la clase como en la casa o en cualquier otro ámbito:</p> <h4>Incentiva regularmente a los niños para que prueben cosas nuevas.</h4> <p>También puedes probar algo nuevo con tu hijo, como patinar sobre ruedas o un nuevo centro de juegos o videojuego. Nadie es perfecto en nada cuando recién comienza, y esta es una excelente forma de mostrarle a tu hijo que no se termina el mundo si se falla o no se gana.</p> <h4>Ajusta el grado de perseverancia que se necesita.</h4> <p>Si los niños necesitan un pequeño desafío, preséntales uno relacionado con actividades en las que ya tienen habilidades. Si necesitan un desafío más grande, sácalos de su zona de confort.</p> <h4>Comparte algunas situaciones en las que necesitaste perseverancia y determinación para alcanzar un objetivo difícil.</h4> <p>No solemos hablar de nuestras dificultades pasadas, entonces los niños pueden llegar a creer que los logros de los adultos llegan fácilmente.</p> <h4>Sé franco.</h4> <p>Diles que están trabajando en su capacidad de perseverancia y recuérdales que es probable que se enfrenten a una dificultad y a un fracaso. Saber que se espera que atraviesen obstáculos simplifica la tarea.</p> <h4>Acompáñalos en sus dificultades o fallas.</h4> <p>Bríndales apoyo, ayúdalos a evaluar por qué no salió como esperaban, y oriéntalos para determinar cómo reorganizarse y volver a intentarlo.</p> <h4><strong>Estimúlalos.</strong></h4> <p>No los recompenses o felicites solo en los logros. Reconoce también el esfuerzo y la perseverancia.</p> <p>Todos, sin importar nuestra situación en particular, necesitamos desarrollar estas habilidades esenciales. Todos podemos beneficiarnos al tener la habilidad de activar los esfuerzos necesarios y seguir adelante después de un contratiempo. Al poner en práctica estas habilidades, tu hijo estará mejor preparado para afrontar desafíos, superar obstáculos y tener la fuerza motivadora que se necesita para hacer prosperar sus esfuerzos.</p> <p><em>Sean Slade y Thomas Hoerr forman parte del panel de expertos en temas sociales y emocionales de Parent Toolkit de NBC. Slade es director de Whole Child Programs en <a href="http://www.ascd.org/">ASCD</a> y coautor de <a href="http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/Overview/School-Climate-Change.aspx">School Climate Change: How do I build a positive environment for learning?</a> (ASCD, 2014). Hoerr es director de New City School en St. Louis, Mo., y ha trabajado con su cuerpo docente para implementar la teoría de inteligencias múltiples desde 1988. Su último libro es <a href="http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/Overview/Fostering-Grit.aspx">Fostering Grit: How do I prepare my students for the real world?</a> (ASCD, 2013).</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,2B71E811-5056-9A4B-6C95674E78ACA0A9,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:08:12.14
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:00:07.193
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Perseverance and Grit Can Be Taught
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 08656DA0-6C3C-11E4-876B0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B71E811-5056-9A4B-6C95674E78ACA0A9
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2014-11-17 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER The ability to persevere is necessary to develop a mind-set for success because no one, no matter how talented, achieves everything every time. Perseverance is a skill that can be taught. Although most of us learn it through trial and error, it can and should be taught, just like any other key skill or competency.
TEASERES La perseverancia es la cualidad que le permite a un individuo seguir intentando algo aun en contextos difíciles, adversos o imposibles.
TEASERIMAGE E7F37310-1D45-11E7-A4000050569A4B6C
TITLE Perseverance and Grit Can Be Taught
TITLEES La perseverancia y la determinación se pueden enseñar
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC0971F-9E78-135D-DE1F1D50844E67E4
2 EDC09718-E003-A630-D87B82211234706F

Grumpy Kid

Estresarse Menos: Estrategias Para Mantener la Calma

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1OlMWju
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1NmPqhw
BODY <p>Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Have you had a hard time managing those emotions? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. In this video, you’ll find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down. </p>
BODYES <p>&iquest;Alguna vez se ha sentido estresado, enojado o frustrado? &iquest;Ha sido dif&iacute;cil manejar esas emociones? Lo m&aacute;s probable es que s&iacute;, y que sus hijos se han sentido igual. En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (&iexcl;y usted!) se mantenga calmo.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-10-06 16:49:45.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:31.947
DESCRIPTION Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. Find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on strategies to help you and your child tackle stress.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141585174?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141586478?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" height="281" width="500" frameBorder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/141585174
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/141586478
FACEBOOKTEXT Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. Find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down.
FACEBOOKTEXTES ¿Alguna vez se ha sentido estresado, enojado o frustrado? ¿Ha sido difícil manejar esas emociones? Lo más probable es que sí, y que sus hijos se han sentido igual. En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (¡y usted!) se mantenga calmo.
LABEL Stress Less: Calming Strategies
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID C59DC5E0-6C6B-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-10-06 16:49:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Strategies to Help Your Child Tackle Stress
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Stress Less: Calming Strategies
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Strategies to Help Your Child Tackle Stress
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Have you had a hard time managing those emotions? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. Find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down by watching the Support Social & Emotional Development video series on ParentToolkit.com!
TEASERES ¿Alguna vez se ha sentido estresado, enojado o frustrado? ¿Ha sido difícil manejar esas emociones? Lo más probable es que sí, y que sus hijos se han sentido igual. En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (¡y usted!) se mantenga calmo.
TEASERIMAGE D0264BB0-18D9-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Stress Less: Calming Strategies
TITLEES Estresarse Menos: Estrategias Para Mantener la Calma
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Vídeo: En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (¡y usted!) se mantenga calmo.
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Learn strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09713-0793-7966-3CBC318C02159515
2 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D

Mom & kid on laptop

Cómo los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos a lidiar con el estrés

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1vTVxNP
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>At <em>Highlights for Children</em>, we believe that one of the best ways to nurture kids is to lean in and listen to what they have to say. So we answer every letter and email we receive from children—tens of thousands each year. And annually, we poll kids in our <a href="http://www.highlights.com/state-of-the-kid">State of the Kid</a> survey, where we ask kids 6-12 what it’s like to be a kid today.</p> <p>In this year’s survey, we asked kids questions about school. With all the change in education—the introduction of Common Core State Standards and the emphasis on testing and accountability, to name a few—we wanted to explore children’s feelings about going to school. Here’s what we learned:</p> <p>Fifty-six percent of kids surveyed said that they are excited or happy when they head to school in the morning. But as kids get older, their positive feelings decline. Only 48 percent of 11- to 12-year-olds report these positive feelings. Twenty-two percent said they were bored in school (slightly higher among boys at 25 percent and with older kids, 27 percent of 11- to 12-year-olds.)</p> <p><span class="white"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=C438B4B0-A0CC-11E3-87540050569A5318">Check out the Academic Tips to see how you can support your child's learning at home. <br /></a></span></p> <p>When asked if any part of school made them feel worried or stressed, nearly half the surveyed kids said yes. Not surprisingly, tests were named as a primary source of kids’ stress (33% higher among 9- to 12-year-olds). Seventeen percent of these kids said math makes them feel stressed. Ten percent named bad grades.</p> <p>Stress, it turns out, is not exclusively the domain of adults. And the idea of a carefree childhood may be magical thinking.</p> <p>This isn’t really a surprise, of course. But are we underestimating the effect this stress has on kids? Results of a <a href="https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2010/national-report.pdf">2010 study</a> by the American Psychological Association suggests that we are. Their study found that one-fifth of children report that they worry a great deal. But their study also found that only 3 percent of parents rated their children’s stress as extreme.</p> <p>These findings are concerning because chronic stress left untreated can contribute to psychological problems, as well as physical conditions. And it can certainly negatively affect kids’ school performance.</p> <p>What are the telltale signs of stress in children? Experts say to watch for changes in behavior, increased irritability and moodiness. Younger children may become clingy. Sleeping and eating patterns may change. Physical symptoms could include stomach aches and headaches. Some children may ask to stay home too often, or excessively visit the school nurse.</p> <p>These indications of stress require our full attention. Of course, we can’t eliminate stress from our children’s lives. But we can—and must—teach them how to manage it. We think making ourselves available to listen and talk to kids about stress is one important way to do this. Here are tips--gleaned from experts, parents, and kids themselves--for talking to children about stress:</p> <ul> <li><p>Listen first, and then talk. Help kids understand that feeling stress is a normal part of life. Remember that what children find stressful might not seem stressful to you or even to other children, but it’s real to them.</p></li> <li><p>Pay attention to what kids are saying is “worrying” or “bothering” them, or are things they “don’t like.” All these words could be code for stress.</p></li> <li><p>When you talk to your kids, resist the temptation to multi-task. Sixty-two percent of the kids we surveyed told us that their parents are sometimes distracted when they try to talk to them. The number one distraction? Their parents’ cell phones. Kids also told us that they know their parents are listening when their parents make eye contact with them, and they told us that dinner time and bedtime are two of the best times to talk together about something important. But any time when you can be focused solely on your child is a good time.</p></li> <li><p>When talking about tests and grades with children who stress over them, keep the focus more on learning and improvement than on grades. Resist asking, “What grade did you get?” after a big test. Instead, try “Do you think you did your best? How do you feel about it?” Be positive and forward looking, even when the grades are less than desirable: “Let’s talk about how you might do better next time.”  </p></li> </ul> <p>And remember that children are always watching us. Model healthy ways of dealing with stress. Make sure your children see you exercising, relaxing, and making time for fun and laughter. </p> <p><em>Christine French Cully is the editor in chief of <strong>Highlights for Children, Inc</strong><strong>.,</strong> where she is responsible for shaping the editorial direction of all the products the company develops for children. She is a frequent speaker at writers’ and educators’ conferences, and she is a member of several boards and professional organizations. </em></p>
BODYES <p>En <em>Highlights for Children</em> creemos que una de la mejores formas de criar a nuestros hijos es prestarles atención y escuchar lo que tienen para decir. Por lo tanto, respondemos a todas y cada una de las cartas y correos electrónicos que recibimos de los niños... que son decenas de miles por año. Además, una vez por año realizamos la encuesta State of the Kid entre niños de 6 a 12 años y les preguntamos cómo es ser niño actualmente.</p> <p>En la encuesta de este año hicimos preguntas sobre la escuela. Debido a los cambios en el sistema educativo con la introducción de los Estándares Comunes Estatales (Common Core State Standards) y el énfasis en la evaluación y la responsabilidad, por mencionar algunos, queríamos conocer los sentimientos de los niños con respecto a la escuela y la asistencia a clases. Estas son nuestras conclusiones:</p> <p>El 56% de los niños encuestados respondieron que se sienten felices y entusiasmados cuando van hacia la escuela pero, a medida que crecen, estos sentimientos positivos disminuyen. Solo el 48% de los niños de 11 y 12 años manifiestan estos sentimientos positivos. El 22% dijo que se aburre en la escuela (levemente superior entre los varones: 25% y entre los niños mayores: 27% de los niños de 11 y 12 años).</p> <p>Cuando se les preguntó si alguna actividad escolar los preocupaba o les causaba estrés, casi la mitad de los niños encuestados respondieron afirmativamente. No sorprende que hayan identificado a los exámenes como la principal causa de estrés (33% superior entre los niños de 9 a 12 años). El 17% de estos niños declaró que las matemáticas los estresan. El 10% mencionó a las malas calificaciones.</p> <p>Resulta ser que el estrés no es dominio exclusivo de los adultos. Y la idea de que la infancia es una etapa libre de preocupaciones bien podría tratarse de un pensamiento mágico.</p> <p>Esto no es realmente una novedad, pero ¿estamos subestimando el efecto que tiene el estrés en los niños? Los resultados de un estudio realizado en 2010 por la Asociación Estadounidense de Psicología sugieren que sí, lo estamos subestimando. El estudio muestra que 1/5 de los niños declaran preocuparse mucho. Pero también muestra que solo el 3% de los padres consideran que el estrés que padecen sus hijos es extremo.</p> <p>Estos hallazgos son preocupantes porque el estrés crónico, si no es tratado, puede contribuir al desarrollo de problemas psicológicos, enfermedades y, ciertamente, afectar en forma negativa el desempeño escolar de los niños.</p> <p>¿Cuáles son los signos reveladores de estrés en los niños? Los expertos dicen que debemos estar atentos a los cambios en la conducta, mayor irritabilidad y cambios de humor. Los niños más pequeños pueden volverse dependientes y se alteran los patrones de sueño y de alimentación. Entre los síntomas físicos podemos incluir dolores estomacales y de cabeza. Algunos niños piden quedarse en casa y no ir a la escuela o visitan la enfermería de la escuela con demasiada frecuencia.</p> <p>Estos indicadores de estrés requieren de toda nuestra atención. Desde luego, no podemos eliminar el estrés de la vida de nuestros hijos, pero podemos, y debemos, enseñarles a manejarlo. Y creemos que una forma de hacerlo es estar a disposición de nuestros hijos para escucharlos y hablar sobre este tema. Estos son algunos consejos que recogimos de expertos, padres, y de los niños también, para trabajar sobre el estrés:</p> <ul> <li>Primero escucha, luego habla. Ayuda a tus hijos a comprender que sentir estrés es algo habitual en la vida cotidiana. Recuerda que las cosas que los niños consideran como estresantes podrían no serlo para ti, o incluso para otros niños, pero para ellos es algo muy real.</li> <li>Presta atención a las cosas que mencionan como “preocupantes”, que les “molestan” o que les “disgustan”. Todas estas palabras podrían ser un código para el estrés.</li> <li>Cuando hables con tus hijos, resiste la tentación de hacer otras cosas al mismo tiempo. El 62% de los niños encuestados expresó que, muchas veces, los padres se distraen cuando intentan hablar con ellos. ¿Cuál es la principal distracción? El teléfono celular. Los niños también contaron que saben que sus padres les están prestando atención si mantienen el contacto visual con ellos; y que la hora de la cena o antes de ir a dormir son los mejores momentos para hablar de algo importante. Pero cualquier momento en el que puedas dedicarte exclusivamente a tu hijo será un buen momento.</li> <li>Cuando hables sobre exámenes y notas con niños que se estresan por esto, haz hincapié en el aprendizaje y la superación, no en las notas. Después de un examen importante, evita preguntar “¿Qué nota sacaste?” Mejor intenta con “¿Crees que hiciste tu mejor esfuerzo? ¿Cómo te sientes?” Sé positivo y mira hacia el futuro, incluso cuando las notas sean inferiores a lo deseable: “Las próxima vez lo harás mejor, veamos cómo hacerlo”.</li> </ul> <p>Y recuerda, los niños siempre nos miran. Enséñales formas saludables de lidiar con el estrés, que te vean hacer ejercicio, relajarte, haciéndote tiempo para divertirte y pasarla bien.</p> <p><em>Christine French Cully es la editora en jefe de <strong>Highlights for Children, Inc.</strong>, donde es responsable de la dirección editorial de todos los productos para niños que desarrolla la compañía. Es una oradora habitual en conferencias de escritores y educadores, y miembro de varias juntas directivas y organizaciones profesionales.</em></p>
CATHTML F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
CREATEDBY christinafisher_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:08:03.67
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:59:13.403
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL How Parents Can Help Children Deal with Stress
LASTUPDATEDBY christinafisher_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 80B273F0-4FD3-11E4-90E20050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-10-10 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER When asked if any part of school made them feel worried or stressed, nearly half the surveyed kids said yes. Stress, it turns out, is not exclusively the domain of adults. And the idea of a carefree childhood may be magical thinking. Here are tips--gleaned from experts, parents, and kids themselves--for talking to children about stress.
TEASERES En Highlights for Children creemos que una de la mejores formas de criar a nuestros hijos es prestarles atención y escuchar lo que tienen para decir.
TEASERIMAGE 7FD1CED0-2466-11E7-AA190050569A4B6C
TITLE How Parents Can Help Children Deal with Stress
TITLEES Cómo los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos a lidiar con el estrés
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 CD61CCF0-4FD3-11E4-90E20050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Girls Soccer

Estimular elecciones saludables en los adolescentes

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>During adolescence, children have a natural tendency to seek out and take risks. There is some <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2964271/" target="_blank">evidence</a> that your teen’s developing brain may play a part in this behavior. The regions of your child’s brain that seek sensation are developing quickly at this point, which essentially means your teen’s brain wants more things that make them feel good. At the same time, the area in the brain that controls impulses and evaluates risk is not yet mature. As a result, teens have a heightened desire for risk without the ability to fully understand the consequences. Heightened pleasure-seeking drives adolescents to experiment with drugs, alcohol, sex, and other risky behaviors. Even if your teen doesn’t appear to be a wild risk-taker, it’s still worth discussing risky behaviors with them. In 2013, the Centers for Disease Control surveyed teens about their risky behaviors and <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6304.pdf" target="_blank">found</a> at least 66 percent of high-schoolers had tried alcohol, as many as 40 percent had tried cigarettes, and 46 percent had engaged in sexual intercourse. It may be uncomfortable and difficult to talk to your teen about these behaviors, but your awareness and involvement can help your teen navigate these years.</p> <p>Not all risk-taking is bad. In fact, taking risks is part of learning and growing up. You can help your teen with risk-taking by encouraging healthy risks. Examples include trying out for a new sport, asking a friend out on a date, volunteering locally or getting involved in an organization like Habitat for Humanity where they’ll get to volunteer and see other communities. Any time your child is exposed to something new, they take a risk, which leads to their continued growth and development.</p> <p>Keep an open mind when talking with your child about risk-taking. Education consultant Jennifer Miller says your approach to conversations with your child can open or shut the door to your teen’s listening. Ask questions with an open mind and listen to your teen’s thoughts and feelings carefully. While you may have your own conclusions on sex, drugs and alcohol, Miller recommends remembering that your teen is likely getting their first experiences and opportunities to form their own thoughts on these issues. Ideally, you’d like your child to come to their own conclusions with your support. Your openness to discussion will show that you care and are approachable on sensitive issues and are there whenever they need to talk with you.</p> <p>Know your high-schooler’s friends. While taking a risk is ultimately your child’s decision, knowing the people who are close to them and have a strong influence on their behavior will help you gauge what kinds of behaviors your teen may be up to when you’re not around. Of course not every friend who is into drinking or other risky behaviors will be able to convince them to join in, but the temptation can have an effect on your teen’s choices. Tom Hoerr, Head of School at New City School in St. Louis, recommends also reaching out to the parents of your child’s friends. Asking whether they allow drinking; if they have firearms in the house, and if they’re secured; and whether they’ll be home when the kids are there are all legitimate questions. Hoerr says some parents may react in an unfriendly manner, but your child’s safety is too important not to check.</p> <p>Talk to your teen about the consequences of risky behavior. For example, alcohol use leads to impaired judgment, like driving after drinking, getting into a car with a friend who has been drinking, or feeling physically ill the next day. It can be hard to talk to your child about these issues, but the more you create an open conversation, the more influence you may have. Try to support your teen when they make good choices even when they're engaged in risky behavior. For example, if they are at a party and have had too much to drink or a friend has had too much to drink, let them know they can call you to pick them up, or offer to pay for a cab for them.</p>
BODYES <p>Durante la adolescencia, los niños tienen la tendencia natural de buscar y tomar riesgos. Existe cierta evidencia de que el cerebro en desarrollo de su hijo adolescente cumple una función en este comportamiento. Las regiones del cerebro de su hijo que buscan la sensación se están desarrollando rápidamente en este momento, lo que esencialmente significa que el cerebro de su hijo adolescente quiere más cosas que lo hagan sentirse bien. Al mismo tiempo, el área del cerebro que controla los impulsos y evalúa el riesgo aún no ha madurado. Como resultado, los adolescentes tienen un elevado deseo de riesgo sin la capacidad de comprender completamente las consecuencias. La búsqueda elevada de placer impulsa a los adolescentes a experimentar con drogas, alcohol, sexo y otros comportamientos peligrosos. Aun cuando su hijo no parezca ser una persona que tome riesgos de manera alocada, vale la pena analizar los comportamientos peligrosos con él. En 2013, los <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6304.pdf" target="_blank">Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades</a> encuestaron a adolescentes sobre sus comportamientos peligrosos y descubrieron que al menos un 66% de los alumnos en la escuela secundaria habían probado el alcohol, nada más y nada menos que un 40% había probado los cigarrillos y un 46% había tenido relaciones sexuales. Puede ser incómodo y difícil hablar con su adolescente sobre estos comportamientos, pero su conciencia y participación puede ayudar a su hijo a transitar estos años.</p> <p>Tomar riesgos no siempre es malo. De hecho, tomar riesgos es parte del aprendizaje y del crecimiento. Para ayudar a su hijo adolescente a tomar riesgos, aliéntelo a tomar riesgos saludables. Entre los ejemplos se incluye probar un nuevo deporte, invitar a salir a un amigo, ofrecerse como voluntario en su comunidad o participar en una organización como Habitat for Humanity en donde podrá ofrecerse como voluntario y ver otras comunidades. Cada vez que su hijo se expone a algo nuevo, asume un riesgo, que conduce a su crecimiento y desarrollo continuos.</p> <p>Mantenga una actitud abierta cuando hable con su hijo sobre tomar riesgos. La asesora educativa Jennifer Miller dice que el método que emplee para conversar con su hijo puede abrir o cerrar la puerta de la escucha de su hijo adolescente. Formule preguntas con una mente abierta y escuche los pensamientos y sentimientos de su hijo adolescente con atención. Si bien usted puede tener sus propias conclusiones sobre el sexo, las drogas y el alcohol, Miller recomienda recordar que es posible que su hijo adolescente tenga sus primeras experiencias y oportunidades de formar sus propios pensamientos sobre estos asuntos. Idealmente, su hijo debe arribar a sus propias conclusiones con su apoyo. Su franqueza hacia el debate demostrará que usted se preocupa y que es accesible a asuntos delicados y que está presente cada vez que él necesite hablar con usted.</p> <p>Conozca a los amigos de su hijo que asiste a la escuela secundaria. Si bien, a la larga, tomar un riesgo es decisión de su hijo, conocer a las personas que lo rodean y tienen una fuerte influencia en su comportamiento lo ayudará a evaluar qué tipos de comportamientos puede demostrar su hijo adolescente cuando usted no está cerca.</p> <p>Por supuesto, no todos los amigos a los que les guste beber o tener otro tipo de comportamiento peligroso podrán convencer a su hijo a que participe en estos, pero la tentación puede afectar las elecciones de su hijo adolescente. Tom Hoerr, director de la escuela New City School en St. Louis, también recomienda ponerse en contacto con los padres de los amigos de su hijo. Preguntarles si ellos permiten que beban; si tienen armas de fuego en la casa y si estas están aseguradas; y si están en la casa cuando los niños están allí son todas preguntas legítimas. Hoerr dice que algunos padres pueden reaccionar de una manera hostil, pero la seguridad de su hijo es muy importante como para no ser controlada.</p> <p>Hable con su hijo adolescente sobre las consecuencias del comportamiento peligroso. Por ejemplo, el uso del alcohol conduce a la alteración del juicio, como, por ejemplo, conducir después de haber bebido, subir a un auto con un amigo que ha estado bebiendo, o sentirse mal físicamente al día siguiente. Puede ser difícil hablar con su hijo sobre estos asuntos, pero mientras más abierta sea la conversación, más influencia podrá tener usted. Intente respaldar a su hijo adolescente cuando él tome buenas decisiones, aun cuando esté involucrado en comportamientos peligrosos. Por ejemplo, si se encuentra en una fiesta y ha bebido mucho o un amigo ha bebido mucho, hágale saber que puede llamarlo a usted para que lo pase a buscar u ofrezca pagarle un taxi.</p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4633AEF-5056-9A4B-6CFC734C17EE9A78
CMLABEL Encouraging Healthy Teen Risk-Taking
CREATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-24 13:43:32.32
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:28:46.7
DESCRIPTION Even if your teen doesn’t appear to be a wild risk-taker, it’s still worth discussing risky behaviors with them. Learn helpful tips.
DESCRIPTIONES Aun cuando su hijo no parezca ser una persona que tome riesgos de manera alocada, vale la pena analizar los comportamientos peligrosos con él.
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in these tips on encouraging healthy teen risk-taking.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Even if your teen doesn’t appear to be a wild risk-taker, it’s still worth discussing risky behaviors with them. Learn helpful tips.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Encouraging Healthy Teen Risk-Taking
LASTUPDATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 4D4CE1E0-2197-11E4-826A0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F4633AEF-5056-9A4B-6CFC734C17EE9A78
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-01-24 13:43:00.0
SEOTITLE Tips on Encouraging Healthy Teen Risk-Taking
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Tips on Encouraging Healthy Teen Risk-Taking
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Even if your teen doesn’t appear to be a wild risk-taker, it’s still worth discussing risky behaviors with them.
TEASERES Aun cuando su hijo no parezca ser una persona que tome riesgos de manera alocada, vale la pena analizar los comportamientos peligrosos con él.
TEASERIMAGE C121E310-1EEF-11E7-B8B30050569A4B6C
TITLE Encouraging Healthy Teen Risk-Taking
TITLEES Estimular elecciones saludables en los adolescentes
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Great tips on encouraging healthy teen risk-taking via @EducationNation:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09718-E003-A630-D87B82211234706F
2 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D

Conciencia Social

La conciencia social es la capacidad de comprender y respetar el punto de vista de los demás y de aplicar este conocimiento a las interacciones sociales con personas de diferentes ámbitos.

group selfie
Consejos

Ver más

happy girl portrait
Puntos de Referencia

Ver más


Recomendado

Group of Volunteers

Construcción de la Habilidades Sociales

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1OI5PgF
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1NTWxhs
BODY <p>Did you know that 54% of parents in our State of Parenting poll said good social and communication skills are the most important for their child’s future success? In this video, you’ll learn ways to build your child’s social skills at any age. </p>
BODYES <p>&iquest;Sab&iacute;a usted que 54% de los padres en nuestra encuesta State of Parenting dijeron que tener buenas habilidades sociales y de comunicaci&oacute;n son lo m&aacute;s importante para el futuro &eacute;xito de sus hijos? En este video aprender&aacute;s como construir las habilidades sociales de su hijo a cualquier edad.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-10-06 17:12:26.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:31.387
DESCRIPTION Good social and communication skills are very important for your child’s future success. Learn ways to build their social skills at any age.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on ways to build your child’s social skills at any age.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141595418?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141596032?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" height="281" width="500" frameBorder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/141595418
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/141596032
FACEBOOKTEXT Good social and communication skills are very important for your child’s future success. Learn ways to build their social skills at any age.
FACEBOOKTEXTES ¿Sabía usted que 54% de los padres en nuestra encuesta State of Parenting dijeron que tener buenas habilidades sociales y de comunicación son lo más importante para el futuro éxito de sus hijos? En este video aprenderás como construir las habilidades sociales de su hijo a cualquier edad.
LABEL Building Social Skills
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID F1129F40-6C6E-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-10-06 17:12:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Build Your Child’s Social Skills at Any Age
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Building Social Skills
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Build Your Child’s Social Skills at Any Age
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Did you know that 54% of parents in our State of Parenting poll said good social and communication skills are the most important for their child’s future success?
TEASERES ¿Sabía usted que 54% de los padres en nuestra encuesta State of Parenting dijeron que tener buenas habilidades sociales y de comunicación son lo más importante para el futuro éxito de sus hijos? En este video aprenderás como construir las habilidades sociales de su hijo a cualquier edad.
TEASERIMAGE 308E9C90-18D6-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Building Social Skills
TITLEES Construcción de la Habilidades Sociales
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Vídeo: En este video aprenderás como construir las habilidades sociales de su hijo a cualquier edad.
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Learn ways to build your child’s social skills at any age via @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09713-0793-7966-3CBC318C02159515
2 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D

42 formas simples de criar un hijo empático

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/295ENBg
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Empathy is the ability to identify with and feel for another person. It’s the powerful quality that halts violent and cruel behavior and urges us to treat others kindly. Empathy emerges naturally and quite early, which means our children are born with a huge built-in advantage for success and happiness. But although children are born with the capacity for empathy, it must be nurtured and takes commitment and relentless, deliberate action every day and can’t be left to chance.</p> <p>Here are 42 simple ways to help us raise empathetic children despite a plugged-in, me-centered culture. These ideas are from my latest book, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/UnSelfie-Empathetic-Succeed-All-About-Me-World/dp/1501110039"><em>UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About Me World</em></a>(Touchstone, June 2016), which is chock-full of research-based, proven strategies to boost empathy and teaches the nine essential habits of empathy (Emotional Literacy, Moral Identity, Perspective Taking, Moral Imagination, Self-Regulation, Practicing Kindness, Collaboration, Moral Courage and Altruistic leadership). None cost a dime or take a Ph.D. to implement, but using them will help us raise what we all hope for: good people with strong minds <em>and </em>caring hearts. </p> <p><strong>1. Talk feelings. </strong>Kids need an emotion vocabulary to discuss feelings and guidance to become emotionally literate. Point out feelings in films, books, or people and use emotion words<strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong>2. Be an emotion coach. </strong>Find natural moments to connect face-to-face, listen, and validate your child’s feelings while boosting emotional literacy (“You look happy. You seem sad.”)</p> <p><strong>3. Share kind deeds. </strong>Let’s not assume kids know how to show others they care. Tune them up! “That girl looks like she could use a hug.” “I bet that boy hopes someone asks him to play.”</p> <p><strong>4. Make teamwork and caring a priority.</strong>Insist that they consider others, even when it inconveniences them.</p> <p><strong>5. Teach: “Always look at the color of the talker’s eyes.” </strong>Kids must learn to read people’s emotions face to face, so enforce the “color of the talker’s eye” rule to help them use eye contact, and pick up facial expressions, voice tone and emotional cues.</p> <p><strong>6. Make kindness matter</strong>. Instead of, “I want you to be happy.” Stress, “I want you to be kind.”</p> <p><strong>7. Use “Feels + Needs” formula. </strong>Draw attention to people’s feelings, and then ask your child to guess what the person might feel or need in order to change his mood or be comforted.</p> <p><strong>8. Start kid book clubs. </strong>It’s a fun way for parents to connect with their kids and they with peers while boosting empathy and a love of reading. Try: <em>The Mother-Daughter Book Club.</em></p> <p><strong>9. Point out the impact of uncaring</strong>. When you see lack of caring or unkindness, don’t be afraid to lay down the law and say ‘Not in this family.’</p> <p><strong>10. Use the “2 Kind Rule.”</strong> Get kids in the habit of being kind. “Everyday you leave this house I expect you to say or do at least two kind things to someone else.”</p> <p><strong>11. Develop a caring mindset. </strong>Help your child see himself as kindhearted by praising the times he is.</p> <p><strong>12. Use nouns, not verbs.</strong> Using the noun ‘helper’ may motivate children to help more. So if you want your child to see himself as a caring person, highlight times he is a helper. Or ways he could be more of a helper.  </p> <p><strong>13. Focus on character. </strong>Praising kids’ character helps them internalize altruism as part of their identities. So use labels that stress your child’s kind-heartedness. “You’re the kind of person who likes to help others.” Or “You’re a considerate person.”</p> <p><strong>14. Model kindness. </strong>Want a caring child? Model the behaviors you want your child to adopt.</p> <p><strong>15. Do five kind acts a day. </strong>One study found that kids who did five kind acts in one day (like writing a thank-you to a teacher, doing someone’s chores, working at a shelter) - instead of spreading their acts over a week – gained the biggest happiness boost at the end of a six-week study period. So encourage kids to get on a kindness brigade.</p> <p><strong>16. Make kindness a regular happening</strong>. Set an empty box by your door for kids to put gently used toys, books, and games. When filled, deliver it together to a shelter or less-fortunate family.</p> <p><strong>17. Get kids to reflect on kindness.</strong> Instead of always asking, “What did you learn today?” Try: “What’s something kind you did? Or “What’s something nice that someone did for you?”</p> <p><strong>18. Imagine how the person feels<em>.</em> </strong>To help your child identify with the feelings of others, have him imagine how the other person feels about a specific circumstance. </p> <p><strong>19. Share good news. </strong>Cut out news stories about kids who are doing caring deeds and share them with your child and friends to inspire their hearts to do the same.</p> <p><strong>20. Stress the impact. </strong>Help kids see howcaring might make others feel.“How do you think Grandma will feel when she gets your card?” “Make your face look like Sally’s when she opens your gift. You’re right, she’ll be so happy.”</p> <p><strong>21. Make kindness a routine. </strong>Kindness is strengthened by seeing, hearing and practicing kindness. So find simple ways to tune it up and weave it into daily routines.</p> <p><strong>22. Reduce your MEs and increase your WEs. </strong>For instance: What should <em>we </em>do?” “Which would be better for <em>us</em>?” “Let’s take a ‘<em>We’ </em>vote, to do what <em>we </em>choose.”</p> <p><strong>23. Halt the “parading.”</strong> Praise when deserved, but focus on your child’s “inside-out” qualities: their kindness, respect, courage so she sees herself as a caring person.</p> <p><strong>24. Make sure at least half your questions are about your child’s friends.  </strong>You’ll teach your child to think about the world in a different way—that it’s not all about <em>her.</em></p> <p><strong>25. Create a “save, spend, give” system.</strong> Make allowances come with the caveat that kids give a predetermined small portion to the charity of their choice as well as saving a portion.</p> <p><strong>26. Make service a family affair.</strong> Provide opportunities for your child to experience giving to others in your community.</p> <p><strong>27. Help your child create a “caring code.” </strong>Talk to your child often about the kind of person he wants to become, how he wants to make others feel, and what he stands for.</p> <p><strong>28. Urge kids to serve. </strong>Encourage your kids and friends to start a “Care About Others Club” in their neighborhood, school, scout troop, faith group, or community organization.</p> <p><strong>29. Give back frequently.</strong> Don’t assume that a one time visit to the food bank will open your kids’ heart. Empathy is more likely to be expanded with frequent face-to-face visits.</p> <p><strong>30. Teach copers.</strong>Self-regulation helps keep empathy open so teach your child to use deep, slow breaths (“exhale twice as long as you inhale”) to reduce stress and manage strong emotions at the first sign of stress.</p> <p><strong>31. Switch sides<em>. </em></strong>Sibling battle or friendship tiff? Ask conflicting parties involved to “reverse sides” and tell you what happened, but from the other’s side to stretch perspective taking.</p> <p><strong>32. Be “feeling detectives.” </strong>Encourage kids to “investigate” how other people might be feeling. “Listen to the boy’s voice. How do you think he feels?” “Look how that girl has her fists so tight. See the scowl on her face? What do you think she’s saying to the other girl?”</p> <p><strong>33. Choose a summer camp that stresses fun. </strong>A diverse mix of campers doesn’t hurt either!</p> <p><strong>34. Set regular “unplugged” times. </strong>Empathy is learned face to face. Reclaim conversation!</p> <p><strong>35. Hold family movie nights. </strong>Films can be portals to help our children understand other worlds and other views, to be more open to differences and cultivate new perspectives.</p> <p><strong>36. Insist that kids read! </strong>Not only does reading literary fiction (<em>Charlotte’s Web, Wednesday Surprise, Wonder) </em>boost kids academic performance, but it also boosts empathy.</p> <p><strong>37. Find ways to gain a new view.</strong> Depending on your child’s age you might visit a nursing home, homeless shelter, animal shelter, or soup kitchen. The more kids experiences different perspectives, the more likely they can empathize with others whose needs and views differ from theirs.<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>38. Ask, “How would you feel?”</strong> Post questions to help your child think about how she would feel if someone had done the same behavior to her. “Lucas, how would you feel if Aaron yelled out that you can’t hit?”“How would you feel if someone said that to you?”</p> <p><strong>39. Use real events. </strong>The newspaper or television news is rich with possibilities to stretch kids’ empathy.“The fire destroyed their homes. What do you think those kids are feeling and thinking? What can we do to let them know we care?”</p> <p><strong>40. Capture caring moments. </strong>Make sure to display prominently photos of your kids engaged in kind and thoughtful endeavors so they recognize that “caring matters.”</p> <p><strong>41. Use “earshot praise.” </strong>Let your kids overhear (without them thinking they’re supposed to) you describing those qualities to others. “I’m so proud of how kind my child is because…”</p> <p><strong>42. Make a kindness jar. </strong>Each time a parent or child sees <em>another </em>family member act in a kind way, they add a penny, small stone or plastic bead to a large plastic jar. Review the kind acts daily, and if you’re using money, when the jar is full donate the money to a charity of your family’s choice.</p> <p> </p> <p><em><strong><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318" target="_blank">Michele Borba, Ed.D.</a></strong> is an award-winning educational psychologist and an expert in parenting, bullying and character development. She is the author of 22 books including her latest, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/UnSelfie-Empathetic-Succeed-All-About-Me-World/dp/1501110039">UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World.</a> Check out: <a href="http://www.micheleborba.com/">micheleborba.com</a> or follow her on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/micheleborba">@micheleborba.</a></em></p>
BODYES <p>La empatía es la capacidad de identificarse con el otro y sentir por la otra persona. Es una cualidad que frena las conductas crueles y violentas, y nos insta a tratar con amabilidad a los demás. La empatía surge naturalmente y a temprana edad, esto significa que nuestros hijos ya nacen con una gran ventaja para alcanzar el éxito y la felicidad. Pero si bien los niños nacen con empatía, debemos estimularla todos los días, no podemos dejarlo librado al azar. Debemos ser metódicos y constantes.</p> <p>A continuación presentamos 42 consejos sencillos que te ayudarán a criar un hijo empático en una sociedad hiperconectada y centrada en el yo. Estas ideas fueron tomadas de mi último libro, UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About Me World (Touchstone, junio de 2016). En este libro presento gran cantidad de estrategias comprobadas y basadas en investigaciones que te permitirán fomentar la empatía y enseñar los nueve hábitos fundamentales de la empatía: alfabetismo emocional, identidad moral, perspectiva, imaginación moral, autorregulación, amabilidad, colaboración, valentía moral y liderazgo altruista. No es necesario gastar dinero ni estudiar un doctorado para implementarlas, pero usarlas nos ayudará a criar buenas personas, inteligentes y cariñosas.</p> <p><strong>1. Habla sobre los sentimientos.</strong> Los niños necesitan desarrollar un vocabulario emocional para poder expresar sus sentimientos y pedir ayuda, para estar alfabetizados en lo emocional. Señala los sentimientos que se muestran en películas, en libros o en las personas y usa las palabras correspondientes para definir las emociones.</p> <p><strong>2. Ayuda a tu hijo con sus emociones.</strong> Busca momentos que puedan compartir juntos. Escucha y valida los sentimientos de tu hijo mientras estimulas su aprendizaje emocional (“Te vez feliz. Pareces triste”).</p> <p><strong>3. Comparte las buenas acciones.</strong> No demos por sentado que los niños saben demostrar que se preocupan por los demás. ¡Ajústales un poco las tuercas! “A esa niña le haría bien un abrazo”. “Te apuesto a que ese niño espera que alguien lo invite a jugar”.</p> <p><strong>4. Haz que el trabajo en equipo y el interés por los demás sean una prioridad.</strong> Insiste en que deben tomar en cuenta a los demás, aún cuando pueda ser una molestia para ellos.</p> <p><strong>5. Enséñales a mantener siempre el contacto visual.</strong> Los niños deben aprender a leer las emociones en el rostro de la gente. Haz hincapié en que siempre deben mirar a la persona con la que están hablando, para poder interpretar la expresión en su rostro, el tono de voz y los indicios emocionales.</p> <p><strong>6. Haz que la amabilidad sea importante.</strong> En vez de decirle a tu hijo “Quiero que seas feliz”, haz énfasis en decirle “Quiero que seas amable”.</p> <p><strong>7. Aplica la fórmula “sentimientos + necesidades”.</strong> Llama la atención de tu hijo hacia los sentimientos de las personas. Luego, pídele que adivine lo que esa persona podría sentir o necesitar para cambiar su estado de ánimo o ser consolado.</p> <p><strong>8. Inicia un club de lectura para niños.</strong> Es una forma divertida para que los padres pasen tiempo con sus hijos y ellos con sus pares. Al mismo tiempo, estimularás la empatía y el amor por la lectura. Prueba leer The Mother-Daughter Book Club.</p> <p><strong>9. Señala el impacto que causa la indiferencia.</strong> Cuando veas que tus hijos son indiferentes o poco amables, no tengas miedo de aclarar los tantos y decirles “En esta familia no nos comportamos así”.</p> <p><strong>10. Aplica la regla del “acto amable”.</strong> Acostumbra a tus hijos a ser amables. “Espero que todos los días tengas un acto de amabilidad o digas algo amable a otra persona”.</p> <p><strong>11. Desarrolla un esquema mental solidario.</strong> Ayuda a tu hijo a verse a sí mismo como una persona bondadosa; elógialo cuando se comporte así.</p> <p><strong>12. Usa sustantivos, no verbos.</strong> Usar la palabra “ayudante” puede motivar a tus hijos para que ayuden más. Si deseas que tus hijos se perciban a sí mismos como personas solidarias, destaca los momentos en los que se comporta como un “ayudante” o las formas en que podría desempeñar ese rol con más frecuencia.</p> <p><strong>13. Céntrate en el carácter.</strong> Elogiar el carácter de los niños les ayuda a internalizar el altruismo como parte de su identidad. Emplea frases y expresiones que enfaticen la bondad de tu hijo: “Eres una persona que gusta de ayudar a los demás” o “Eres muy considerado”.</p> <p><strong>14. Modela la amabilidad.</strong> ¿Quieres que tu hijo sea amable? Modela las conductas que deseas que tu hijo adopte.</p> <p><strong>15. Realiza cinco actos de amabilidad por día.</strong> Un estudio descubrió que los niños que realizaron cinco actos de amabilidad en un mismo día, en vez de hacerlos en el transcurso de la semana, presentaron los mayores niveles de felicidad al finalizar las seis semanas de duración del estudio. Entre las acciones que realizaron se incluyó escribir una nota de agradecimiento a un maestro, hacer los quehaceres de otro, colaborar en un refugio, etc. Así que alienta a tus hijos a iniciar una cruzada de amabilidad.</p> <p><strong>16. Haz que la amabilidad sea un evento habitual.</strong> Coloca una caja vacía junto a la puerta para que tus hijos coloquen los juguetes, libros y juegos que ya no usen. Una vez llena, pueden llevarla juntos a un refugio o entregarla a una familia menos afortunada.</p> <p><strong>17. Haz que tus hijos reflexionen sobre la amabilidad.</strong> En lugar de hacer siempre la misma pregunta: “¿Qué aprendiste hoy?” Prueba con estas alternativas: “¿Fuiste amable?” o “¿Alguien hizo algo bueno por ti?”</p> <p><strong>18. Imaginen cómo se siente la persona.</strong> Para ayudar a tus hijos a identificarse con los sentimientos de los demás, pídeles que imaginen cómo se siente otra persona ante una situación en especial.</p> <p><strong>19. Comparte las buenas noticias.</strong> Recorta noticias sobre niños que hacen tareas solidarias y compártelas con tus hijos y sus amigos para inspirarlos a hacer lo mismo.</p> <p><strong>20. Enfatiza el impacto que pueden causar.</strong> Ayuda a tus hijos a ver cómo la solidaridad y la amabilidad repercuten en los demás. “¿Cómo crees que se sentirá la abuela cuando reciba tu tarjeta?” “¿Qué cara puso Sally cuando abrió tu regalo? Sí, tienes razón, estaba muy contenta”.</p> <p><strong>21. Haz que la amabilidad sea una rutina.</strong> La amabilidad se refuerza cuando la ponemos en práctica y cuando vemos o escuchamos que se pone en práctica. Busca formas de incorporar esto en las rutinas cotidianas.</p> <p><strong>22. Menos “yo” y más “nosotros”.</strong> Por ejemplo: “¿Qué deberíamos hacer?” “¿Qué sería mejor para nosotros?” “Votemos para elegir una actividad para hacer”.</p> <p><strong>23. Basta de ostentar.</strong> Elogia a tus hijos cuando lo merezcan, pero concéntrate en las cualidades internas: bondad, respeto, valentía, etc. De este modo, tus hijos se verán a sí mismos como personas solidarias.</p> <p><strong>24. Asegúrate de preguntar también por los amigos de tus hijos.</strong> Le enseñarás a tus hijos a ver el mundo de otra manera, que no todo se trata sobre él/ella.</p> <p><strong>25. Crea un sistema de “ahorra, gasta, dona”.</strong> Asigna una mesada a tus hijos, con la condición de que donen una pequeña suma a una organización benéfica que elijan y que otra parte la usen para ahorrar.</p> <p><strong>26. La vocación de servicio es un asunto familiar.</strong> Genera oportunidades para que tus hijos experimenten la vocación de servicio en tu comunidad.</p> <p><strong>27. Ayuda a tus hijos a desarrollar un “código de solidaridad”.</strong> Charla con tus hijos sobre el tipo de persona que quieren ser, cómo quieren hacer sentir a los demás, y cuáles son sus valores.</p> <p><strong>28. Anima a tus hijos a ser solidarios.</strong> Alienta a tus hijos y sus amigos a iniciar un “Club de amigos solidarios” en el barrio, en la escuela, en el grupo de scouts, en el grupo religioso o en organizaciones comunitarias.</p> <p><strong>29. Haz donaciones con frecuencia.</strong> No des por sentado que con visitar el banco de alimentos una sola vez tus hijos se conmoverán y abrirán sus corazones. La empatía se desarrolla con las visitas frecuentes.</p> <p><strong>30. Enséñale a tus hijos técnicas para manejar el estrés.</strong> La autorregulación nos ayuda a que la empatía se manifieste. Enséñale a tus hijos técnicas de respiración (“exhala dos veces más lento de lo que inhalaste”) para ayudarlos a reducir el estrés y a lidiar con emociones fuertes.</p> <p><strong>31. Cambia de bando. ¿Una pelea entre hermanos?</strong> ¿Una riña con amigos? Pídele a las partes en conflicto que “cambien de bando” y te cuenten qué ha ocurrido pero desde la perspectiva del otro, para que aprendan a ver las cosas desde la otra postura.</p> <p><strong>32. “Detectives emocionales".</strong> Anima a tus hijos a “investigar” los sentimientos de las otras personas. “Escucha la voz de ese niño. ¿Cómo crees que se siente?” “Mira cómo esa niña aprieta sus puños. ¿Ves que tiene el ceño fruncido? ¿Qué crees qué le está diciendo a la otra niña?”</p> <p><strong>33. Elige un campamento de verano que priorice la diversión.</strong> También será bueno que la asistencia sea lo más diversa posible.</p> <p><strong>34. Establece momentos para “desconectarse”.</strong> La empatía se aprende mirándose a la cara. ¡Recupera las charlas y las conversaciones frente a frente!</p> <p><strong>35. Organiza noches de cine en familia.</strong> Una película puede ser una excelente puerta de entrada para que los niños conozcan otros mundos y perspectivas, para ser más abiertos a las diferencias y para labrar nuevas perspectivas.</p> <p><strong>36. ¡Insiste con la lectura!</strong> Leer historias de ficción, como Charlotte’s Web, Wednesday Surprise o Wonder, no solo refuerza el desempeño académico de los niños, también refuerza la empatía.</p> <p><strong>37. Busca formas de aportar nuevas perspectivas.</strong> Según la edad de tus hijos, puedes visitar un hogar de ancianos, un refugio para personas sin techo, un refugio para animales o un comedor comunitario. Cuantas más perspectivas distintas conozcan tus hijos, mayor será la probabilidad de empatizar con las personas que tienen necesidades y visiones distintas de las propias.</p> <p><strong>38. Pregunta “¿Tú cómo te sentirías?”</strong> Prepara preguntas para ayudar a tus hijos a analizar cómo se sentirían si otra persona se hubiera comportado de la misma manera. “Lucas, ¿cómo te sentirías si Aaron gritara que no puedes acertarle a la bola?” “¿Cómo te sentirías si alguien te dijera eso?”</p> <p><strong>39. Usa situaciones reales.</strong> Los periódicos y noticieros son excelentes fuentes a las que puedes recurrir para ahondar en el desarrollo de la empatía de tus hijos. “El incendio destruyó su hogar. ¿Cómo se sentirán esos niños, qué estarán pensando? ¿Qué podemos hacer para ayudarlos?”</p> <p><strong>40. Captura los momentos solidarios.</strong> En un lugar destacado de tu casa, coloca fotografías de tus hijos realizando tareas solidarias para que vean que es importante.</p> <p><strong>41. Usa los elogios “disimulados”.</strong> Permite que tus hijos escuchen cómo los elogias (sin que ellos piensen que está bien escuchar conversaciones ajenas). “Estoy muy orgulloso/a de mi hijo/a. Es muy bondadoso porque…”</p> <p><strong>42. Prepara un “frasco de la amabilidad”.</strong> Cada vez que los padres o niños vean a otro miembro de familia comportándose amablemente, guardarán un centavo, una piedra pequeña o una cuenta de plástico en un frasco grande. Evalúa las buenas acciones todos los días y, si deciden usar dinero, una vez que el frasco esté lleno pueden donar ese dinero a una organización benéfica que elija la familia.</p> <p><em>Michele Borba, Ed.D. es una premiada psicóloga educativa y experta en crianza, bullying y desarrollo de carácter. Es autora de 22 libros y su última publicación se titula UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World. Visita: micheleborba.com o síguela en Twitter @micheleborba.</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:30:06.64
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:36:00.25
DESCRIPTION Although children are born with the capacity for empathy, it must be nurtured with deliberate action every day - and can’t be left to chance.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this Parent Toolkit article from educational psychology expert Dr. Michele Borba on 42 simple ways parents can raise empathetic kids.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Educational psychology expert Dr. Michele Borba shares her list of 42 easy ways parents can raise kids to embody empathy throughout their lives.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID F2B7EF20-37F3-11E6-AEE40050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-06-22 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Although children are born with the capacity for empathy, it must be nurtured and takes commitment and relentless, deliberate action every day and can’t be left to chance.
TEASERES La empatía es la capacidad de identificarse con el otro y sentir por la otra persona.
TEASERIMAGE DB4AA7B0-1EBB-11E7-931C0050569A4B6C
TITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
TITLEES 42 formas simples de criar un hijo empático
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET @EducationNation educational psychology expert Dr. Michele Borba shares 42 ways parents can raise empathetic kids:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Girls and Sunflower

Estimular la amabilidad en niños de 5 a 8 años

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Kindness is treating others with compassion and respect. Many parents strive to raise kind and caring children, and compassion is one of the most important values parents seek to instill in their children. While these values play a major role in a child’s social awareness and management, teaching children how to be truly compassionate can be challenging. Some research suggests that almost half of our ability to care and share is inherited from our parents, but, like any skill, the value of kindness is best learned through practice.</p> <p>Weave lessons of kindness into your daily routine. When your child comes home from school, ask her to list two ways that she saw kindness being displayed and how she displayed kindness on that particular day, or two ways others were kind to her. If she has trouble finding examples, start pointing out examples around the house, in TV shows and videos, and when you are out together as a family. An example might be when a sibling shares their toys or helps a younger child cross the street. You can encourage your child to be on the lookout for kindness so you can discuss it at family dinner time. Have each family member share an act of kindness they did.</p> <p>Build a “garden of kindness.” Trace and cut out flower shapes on paper with your child and talk to her about why kindness matters. Ask her to think of ways she can use compassion when dealing with her classmates. Have her write on the flowers reasons why she feels kindness is important and examples, and ask her to read them out loud. You can also work on your own flowers, and when you are both done, you can display the flowers on the refrigerator as a reminder of the value of kindness and compassion. You can do the same basic thing with a map of kindness, cutting out paper in the shapes of states or countries.</p>
BODYES <p>La amabilidad es tratar a las demás personas con compasión y respeto. Muchos padres se esfuerzan por educar niños amables, y la compasión es uno de los valores más importantes que los padres buscan inculcar a sus hijos. Si bien estos valores desempeñan un rol muy importante en la conciencia y el control social de un niño, enseñar a los niños cómo ser verdaderamente compasivo puede ser un desafío. Algunas investigaciones sugieren que casi la mitad de nuestra habilidad para cuidar y compartir se hereda de los padres, pero, como cualquier habilidad, el valor de la bondad se adquiere mejor a través de la práctica.</p> <p>Planee lecciones de la amabilidad en su rutina diaria. Cuando su hija regrese a casa de la escuela, pídale que le cuente dos situaciones en las que observó que se manifestaba la amabilidad y cómo ella demostró bondad ese día en particular, o dos maneras en las que las demás personas fueron bondadosas con ella. Si a su hija no puede encontrar ejemplos, comience a señalar ejemplos de la casa, de programas de televisión y videos, y cuando salgan juntos como familia. Un ejemplo podría ser cuando un hermano comparte sus juguetes o ayuda a un niño más pequeño a cruzar la calle. Usted puede alentar a que su hija preste atención a situaciones en las que se manifieste la amabilidad para que puedan analizarlas en la cena familiar. Haga que cada miembro de la familia comparta un acto de bondad que haya realizado.</p> <p>Construya un “jardín de amabilidad.” Busque y corte papeles en forma de flores con su hija y hable con ella sobre los motivos por los cuales la bondad es importante. Pídale que piense en las maneras en las que puede usar la compasión cuando trate con sus compañeras. Haga que escriba en las flores motivos por los que siente que la amabilidad es importante y ejemplos, y pídale que los lea en voz alta. Usted también puede trabajar con sus propias flores, y cuando los dos hayan terminado, puede colocar las flores en el refrigerador a modo de recordatorio del valor de la amabilidad y la compasión. Puede hacer esto con un mapa de bondad, y cortar papel en forma de estados o países.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB
CMLABEL Encouraging Kindness in Kids Ages 5-8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-24 12:08:39.733
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:28:24.877
DESCRIPTION Compassion is one of the most important values parents can instill in their children. Discover helpful tips on encouraging kindness and compassion in kids.
DESCRIPTIONES La amabilidad es tratar a las demás personas con compasión y respeto.
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in these tips on how to encourage kindness in kids ages 5-8.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Compassion is one of the most important values parents seek to instill in their children. Discover helpful tips on encouraging kindness and compassion in kids.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Encouraging Kindness in Kids Ages 5-8
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0A6FF720-1C0D-11E4-A7A40050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-01-24 12:08:00.0
SEOTITLE Tips on Encouraging Kindness in Kids Ages 5-8
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Tips on Encouraging Kindness in Kids Ages 5-8
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Many parents strive to raise kind and caring children, and compassion is one of the most important values parents can instill in their children.
TEASERES La amabilidad es tratar a las demás personas con compasión y respeto.
TEASERIMAGE F4FE5E90-1EE3-11E7-931C0050569A4B6C
TITLE Encouraging Kindness in Kids Ages 5-8
TITLEES Estimular la amabilidad en niños de 5 a 8 años
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Great tips on how to encourage kindness in kids ages 5-8 via @EducationNation:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Girl at food drive

Por qué aprender a pensar en algo más que nosotros mismos es lo más importante que puedes enseñarle a tus hijos

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2fp09tk
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Today, we can be in our kitchen for breakfast and across the ocean in time for lunch.  From our living room sofa, we can speak face-to-face with someone in Shanghai.  We’re more connected to each other than ever before in human history, and our world continues to get smaller every day.</p> <p>Watching the news, we see the significant challenges that our connectedness can bring—terrorism, epidemics, and cyber threats, just to name a few.  Schools like mine now must teach “21<sup>st</sup> Century Skills” that include maxims like “There is no delete,” and “Nothing is private.”  But, with our help, I believe our children ought to be more hopeful than fearful. </p> <p>Yes, in our connected world, one terrible or reckless moment can do significant harm, <em>but imagine the intentional good that one thoughtful moment might also be able to produce.  </em>If more people had the imagination, the will and the awareness to pursue it, we might accomplish good at a scale and significance unmatched in our history.  This is why it’s so important for us to help our children develop the essential “21<sup>st</sup> Century Skill”: the ability to think beyond themselves.</p> <p>Developmentally, our youngest children will naturally struggle with comprehending a world beyond themselves.  And as they grow up in the “era of selfie,” getting children and adolescents of <em>any</em> age to think beyond themselves poses a challenge.  However, just as it’s far easier to learn to play an instrument or to pick up a second language when you start young, thinking beyond ourselves is a skill that should be acquired and practiced as early and as often as possible.  Our children, and our world, will be better for it.  Here’s how I think we can do this:</p> <p><strong>1. Ask new questions.</strong> </p> <p>Let’s start by asking our children over dinner or at bedtime each night, <em>“What’s something kind you did for someone else today?”</em>  Notice how this is different from the more traditional, “<em>How was your day?</em>” or “<em>What was the best part of your day?</em>”  Those latter questions invite a conversation primarily about what happened <em>to you</em> today--- <em>you</em> are the <em>recipient</em> of what happened.  The new “kindness” question gets us thinking beyond being a recipient, but instead as a contributor, and plants early on in life that essential notion that each day, we ought to be finding some way to impact others.</p> <p>Or here’s another staple from our youth: “<em>What do you want to be when you grow up?</em>”<em>  </em>It’s a worthwhile question, but if we limit ourselves to just this question, we start to subtly suggest that perhaps our purpose in life is simply<em> being</em>, as opposed to <em>doing.  </em>Consider one of these other, more purpose-oriented, questions, instead: “<em>Why do you think you exist?</em>” or “<em>For what purpose are you on this earth?”</em>  It’s harder to answer those questions without thinking of others.  As Einstein (<em>Living Philosophies, </em>1931) so compellingly put it “…<em>there is one thing we do know: that man is here for the sake of other men...”</em></p> <p><em> </em><strong>2. </strong><strong>Model It.</strong></p> <p>As teenagers they might rarely admit it, but for most children, their parents are the single largest influence on who they will become as adults.</p> <p>So even though you might not think your child in the back seat notices, let people merge in front of you during rush hour traffic.  Even though your child seems more interested in the candy selections than anything else in the grocery checkout line, make a point to let the person behind you go in front with their ten items before you unload your twenty items.  Try to stay behind an extra five seconds when you’re entering or exiting a building to hold the door for others coming behind you.  Make a point to thank the refs for their work after your child’s soccer game (even if they made a bad call).  Pick up the piece of litter you see in the parking lot or on the hiking trail and throw it away so someone else doesn’t have to. </p> <p>Yes, grand gestures of generosity and compassion once or twice a year—or even once or twice a week—might offer some important lessons to our children, but the accumulation of the many daily and hourly “little moments” they witness will be even more consequential in the kind of adult they become.  In each of those little moments, we have an opportunity to model whether we are aware of the needs and the perspectives of others beyond ourselves.  Let’s show our children how it’s done.</p> <p><strong>3. </strong><strong>Remember: Practice Makes Permanent</strong></p> <p>Long ago, I had a teacher who often told us, “<em>Practice <span style="text-decoration: underline;">doesn’t make perfect.  Practice makes permanent.</span></em>”  And, of course, after quizzing us and making us repeat it back to him periodically, it stuck with me… which proved his point.</p> <p>“Thinking beyond ourselves” isn’t a natural instinct for most of us—and especially for our younger children—so the most important thing we can do for them is to practice it in big and small ways until it becomes a habit.  I highly recommend the Random Acts of Kindness website  for all kinds of simple, easy ideas that children can do alone, or together with family and friends.  A few of my favorites:</p> <p>- With your child, fill some plastic bags with care packages for the homeless.  A quick web search can offer ideas for what to include, like lip balm, sunscreen and soft, non-perishable food items.  Keep them in the car to periodically hand out your window the next time you’re at a stop light and have an opportunity to help someone in need. <br />- As a family, make some simple notes or cards for veterans that thank them for their service.  Together with your child, start looking around when you’re in parking lots for license plates that identify veterans so you can leave one of those notes for them, or even hand one to them as they return to their car. Our eighth grade students use Writer’s Workshop as a time to write letters to veterans – they get the added bonus of improving their writing skills while thinking beyond themselves and brightening someone’s day.<br />- And speaking of notes, connect with your local chapter of Meals on Wheels, which delivers meals to homebound seniors.  On any holiday (Christmas, Thanksgiving, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, etc.) make cards with your child that can be delivered along with the meals.<br />- Get in the habit of making clothing or toy donations every time your child receives new clothes or gifts.  For birthdays or Christmas, decide together with your child which gently used items might be a wonderful gift to donate to Goodwill, The Salvation Army, or countless other charitable organizations.  (A related tradition at our school is the “Tooth Fairy Tree”, where each time a student loses a tooth, he or she brings a toothbrush, floss, or toothpaste donation to be given to a family in need.)</p> <h4>Imagine!</h4> <p>Our modern, shrinking, connected world will present our children with some daunting challenges now and in the future.  However, it will also present them with incredible opportunities, if only we take the right steps now to instill and cultivate in them the ability to think beyond themselves.</p> <p>Imagine the future for children raised in an environment where the right questions are regularly asked and others-oriented behavior is constantly modeled.  Imagine the future for children who practice giving back to the community just as often as they practice their math facts for school.  Those children will have an excellent opportunity to live a meaningful life of purpose and impact.  They can be a force for good in this world, knowing they have a power to effect widespread, positive change in ways no other generation ever has.</p> <p><em>Tim Tinnesz is Head of School of St. Timothy’s School in Raleigh, NC and sits on the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Association of Independent Schools.  St. Timothy’s is an Episcopal preparatory school that weaves service opportunities into the curriculum to encourage students to make a positive difference in their community and world. In addition to being a life-long educator, Tim is a father to three sons, ages 5, 7, and 9.  </em></p> <p><em>This piece is part of the Parent Toolkit’s Week of Giving. Click here to read more inspirational stories.</em></p> <p><strong>Follow the Parent Toolkit on <a href="http://bit.ly/2bQX6cp" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/educationnation" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="https://www.instagram.com/theparenttoolkit/" target="_blank">Instagram</a>.</strong></p>
BODYES <p>Hoy en día podemos estar desayunando en casa y cruzar al otro lado del mundo para almorzar. Desde el sofá de nuestra sala podemos hablar frente a frente con alguien que está en Shanghái. Estamos más conectados que nunca en la historia de la humanidad, y las distancias se acortan cada vez más.</p> <p>Al mirar las noticias vemos los grandes desafíos que trae la conectividad: terrorismo, epidemias, amenazas cibernéticas, por mencionar algunas. En las escuelas ahora debemos enseñar “Habilidades para el siglo XXI”, que incluyen máximas tales como “No hay forma de borrarlo” y “Nada es privado”. Pero con nuestra ayuda, creo que los niños tendrán más esperanzas que temores.</p> <p>Sí, en este mundo conectado, un mal momento o una imprudencia pueden causar un gran daño, <em>pero imaginemos el bien que podemos hacer con solo un momento de reflexión</em>. Si muchas más personas tuvieran la imaginación, la voluntad y la conciencia para hacerlo, podríamos hacer el bien a gran escala con consecuencias inigualadas en nuestra historia. Por eso es tan importante que ayudemos a nuestros hijos a desarrollar la habilidad fundamental para el siglo XXI: la capacidad de pensar en algo más que en ellos mismos.</p> <p>A nivel de desarrollo, a los niños más pequeños les resultará más difícil comprender que allá afuera hay un mundo que abarca mucho más que a ellos mismos, y a medida que crecen en la “era de la selfie”, hacer que los niños y los adolescentes de cualquier edad piensen en algo más que en ellos mismos nos presenta un gran desafío. Sin embargo, así como es más fácil aprender a tocar un instrumento o a hablar un segundo idioma cuando se comienza de pequeño, pensar en algo más que en nosotros mismos es una habilidad que debería adquirirse y ponerse en práctica tan pronto y con la mayor frecuencia posible. Nuestros niños y el mundo estarían mejor si fuera así. Esta es mi propuesta para conseguirlo:</p> <p><strong>1. Haz preguntas nuevas.</strong></p> <p>Comencemos preguntándole a nuestros hijos durante la cena o antes de ir a dormir <em>“¿Hoy hiciste algo bueno por alguien?”</em> Notemos la diferencia con las más tradicionales <em>“¿Cómo te fue hoy?”</em> o <em>“¿Qué fue lo mejor del día?”</em>. Este tipo de preguntas invitan a iniciar una conversación centrada en lo que te ocurrió <em>a ti, tú</em> eres el receptor de lo que ocurrió. La nueva pregunta sobre “hacer algo bueno” nos obliga a pensar en algo más que ser el mero receptor de las acciones, si no en ser un colaborador. De este modo, introducimos desde muy jóvenes la noción de que cada día debes hacer algo para ayudar a los demás.</p> <p>Este es otro ejemplo: <em>“¿Qué quieres ser cuando seas grande?”</em> Es una pregunta válida, pero si nos limitamos solo a esta pregunta, sutilmente comenzamos a sugerir que tal vez nuestro propósito en la vida es simplemente <em>ser</em>, en contraposición a <em>hacer</em>. Consideremos entonces hacer otras preguntas, más orientadas hacia los propósitos: <em>“¿Por qué crees que existes?”</em> o<em> “¿Cuál es tu propósito en este mundo?”</em> Es mucho más difícil responder a estas preguntas si no pensamos en los demás. Como bien dijo Einstein: “…<em>una cosa sí sabemos: el hombre está en este mundo por el bien de los demás hombres...”(Living Philosophies, 1931)</em></p> <p><strong>2. Crea un modelo a seguir.</strong></p> <p>Los adolescentes nunca lo admitirán, pero para la mayoría de los niños, los padres son su principal influencia y un modelo a seguir para cuando sean adultos.</p> <p>Aunque creas que tu hijo no lo notará mientras va sentado en el asiento trasero, cede el paso a los otros autos durante la hora pico. Aunque tu hijo parezca estar prestando más atención a la variedad de dulces mientras están en la fila para pagar en la tienda, antes de que tú pongas en la cinta transportadora tus muchas bolsas, deja pasar antes a esa persona que está detrás de ti y que solo lleva unos pocos artículos. Cuando entres o salgas de un edificio, demora unos segundos más y sostén la puerta para los que entran o salen después de ti. Después del partido de fútbol de tus hijos, agradece a los árbitros por su trabajo, incluso si tomaron una mala decisión. Recoge la basura que veas en el estacionamiento o al costado del camino y tírala donde corresponde para que otra persona no tenga que hacerlo.</p> <p>Sí, los grandes gestos de generosidad y compasión pueden ofrecer una importante lección a nuestros hijos, ya sea una o dos veces al año, e incluso una o dos veces a la semana. La acumulación de estas “pequeñas acciones” que ellos presencien tendrán importantes consecuencias en su vida como adultos. En cada uno de esos pequeños momentos tendrás una oportunidad para demostrar que podemos ser conscientes de las necesidades y perspectivas de los demás. Demostrémosle a nuestros niños como se hace.</p> <p><strong>3. Recuerda: la práctica hace que las cosas sean permanentes.</strong></p> <p>Hace muchos años, tenía un maestro que nos decía <em>“La práctica <span style="text-decoration: underline;">no</span> hace al maestro. La práctica hace que las cosas sean permanentes”.</em> Por supuesto, después de hacernos preguntas y pedirnos de repetirlo periódicamente, la frase se me pegó... lo cual confirma su dicho.</p> <p>“Pensar en algo más que en nosotros mismos” no surge naturalmente en la mayoría de las personas, en especial los más jóvenes, de modo que lo mejor que podemos hacer por ellos es poner esto en práctica y repetirlo hasta que se transforme en un hábito. Recomiendo mucho el sitio web Random Acts of Kindness, que ofrece ideas muy simples y sencillas para que los niños puedan implementar por sí mismos o junto a su familia y amigos. Estas son algunas de mis favoritas:</p> <ul> <li>Prepara con tus hijos paquetes de ayuda para las personas sin techo. Una rápida búsqueda en Internet te puede dar ideas sobre qué puedes incluir: bálsamo labial, protector solar, alimentos no perecederos. Guárdalos en el auto para tenerlos siempre a mano, y la próxima vez que vayas por la calle podrás ayudar a alguien que lo necesita.</li> <li>Todos juntos en familia escriban cartas breves o tarjetas a los veteranos de guerrea para agradecerles por su servicio al país. Vayan a un estacionamiento y busquen los autos que tengan matrículas que identifican a los veteranos y dejen las notas o tarjetas en el parabrisas. También pueden esperar a que regresen a retirar sus autos y entregárselas directamente. Una de las actividades del taller de escritura de los alumnos de 8.º grado fue escribir cartas a los veteranos. No solo pudieron practicar y mejorar sus habilidades para la escritura, si no que hicieron algo por los demás y le alegraron el día a otra persona.</li> <li>Ponte en contacto con la sede local de Meals on Wheels, que entrega viandas a los adultos mayores que no pueden salir de su casa. Prepara con tus hijos tarjetas para Navidad, Acción de Gracias, el Día de la Madre, el Día del Padre, etc. para que las entreguen junto con las viandas.</li> <li>Cada vez que a tus hijos les regalen ropa o juguetes, revisa la ropa o juguetes que ya no usen para poder donarlos. Para sus cumpleaños o Navidad, decidan juntos qué prendas o artículos en buen estado podrían donar al Ejeécito de Salvación u otras organizaciones benéficas. (En nuestra escuela tenemos una tradición que llamamos “El Árbol del Ratoncito Pérez”. Cuando a un alumno se le cae un diente, hace una donación de cepillos de dientes, hilo dental o dentífrico que luego se entrega a familias necesitadas).</li> </ul> <h4>¡Imagina!</h4> <p>Nuestro mundo moderno, conectado y cada vez más chico, presentará desafíos abrumadores a nuestros hijos; ahora y en el futuro. Pero también les presentará increíbles oportunidades si ahora tomamos las acciones correctas para inculcar y cultivar en ellos la capacidad de pensar en los demás.</p> <p>Imagina el futuro de los niños criados en un ambiente donde se hacen las preguntas correctas y la conducta orientada hacia los demás se alienta en forma constante. Imagina el futuro de los niños que ayudan a la comunidad con la misma frecuencia con que practican las tablas de multiplicar. Esos niños tendrán una excelente oportunidad de llevar una vida plena, con un propósito. Pueden ser una de las fuerzas del bien para este mundo, porque saben que tienen el poder de hacer cambios positivos y en gran escala, en formas que las generaciones anteriores no han podido hacer.</p> <p><em>Tim Tinnesz es Director de la escuela St. Timothy’s en Raleigh, NC. También es miembro de la Junta Directiva de la North Carolina Association of Independent Schools. St. Timothy es una escuela preparatoria episcopal que incluye actividades de servicio comunitario en el plan de estudios para alentar a los estudiantes a marcar una diferencia positiva en su comunidad y en el mundo. Además de ser educador, Tim es padre de tres hijos de 5, 7 y 9 años.</em></p> <p><em>Este artículo forma parte de la Semana de Consejos de Parent Toolkit. Haz clic aquí para leer más historias inspiradoras</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,03CC4DA8-5056-9A4B-6CDB224EDE2B8CC6,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY jonamar_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:50.21
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:39:38.277
DESCRIPTION Learning to think beyond ourselves is the single more important thing you can teach your child.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit about why thinking beyond ourselves is important to teach your child.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Learn why it's important to help your child to develop the ability to think beyond themselves:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Why Learning to Think Beyond Ourselves is the Single Most Important Thing You Can Teach Your Kid
LASTUPDATEDBY jonamar_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 173BECD0-ADC3-11E6-89870050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03CC4DA8-5056-9A4B-6CDB224EDE2B8CC6
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-11-21 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Why Thinking Beyond Ourselves Is Important
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Why Thinking Beyond Ourselves Is Important
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Remember: Practice Makes Permanent.
TEASERES Hoy en día podemos estar desayunando en casa y cruzar al otro lado del mundo para almorzar.
TEASERIMAGE B7C41280-189A-11E7-8A820050569A4B6C
TITLE Why Learning to Think Beyond Ourselves is the Single Most Important Thing You Can Teach Your Kid
TITLEES Por qué aprender a pensar en algo más que nosotros mismos es lo más importante que puedes enseñarle a tus hijos
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Teaching your child to think beyond themselves is especially important in the 21st century. Find out why:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 212723E0-ADC3-11E6-89870050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Habilidades Relacionales

La capacidad de interactuar en forma significativa con los demás y de mantener relaciones saludables con personas y grupos diversos contribuye al éxito general.

father daughter
Consejos

Ver más

hand holding
Puntos de Referencia

Ver más

group of young kids profile
Noticias

Ver más


Recomendado

kid on countertop

¡¿Me estás escuchando?!

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1UFPs7d
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1RkLniN
BODY <p>Sometimes it feels like we need a megaphone to get our kids to listen. This video can help, no megaphone required. </p>
BODYES <p>A veces se siente como que necesitamos un meg&aacute;fono para conseguir que nuestros hijos escuchen. Este video puede ayudar, sin requerir el meg&aacute;fono.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,03C29AC8-5056-9A4B-6C6F182736A99C25,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2016-03-01 15:51:55.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:28.95
DESCRIPTION Watch this "Parent Hacks" video from Parent Toolkit and Education Nation to learn how to get kids to listen more, without shouting or using a megaphone.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this "Parent Hacks" video from Parent Toolkit on how parents can get their kids to listen without the use of a megaphone.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/157329455" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/157329768" height="281" width="500" frameBorder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/157329455
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/157329768
FACEBOOKTEXT Sometimes it feels like we need a megaphone to get our kids to listen. This video can help, no megaphone required. Watch the Parent Hacks video on ParentToolkit.com
FACEBOOKTEXTES A veces se siente como que necesitamos un megáfono para conseguir que nuestros hijos escuchen. Este video puede ayudar, sin requerir el megáfono.
LABEL Are You Listening?!
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 6E52B500-DFEF-11E5-9DA90050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC 03C29AC8-5056-9A4B-6C6F182736A99C25
PUBLISHDATE 2016-03-01 15:51:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Get Your Kids to Finally Listen
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Are You Listening?!
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE How to Get Your Kids to Finally Listen
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Sometimes it feels like we need a megaphone to get our kids to listen. This video can help, no megaphone required. Watch the Parent Hacks video on ParentToolkit.com
TEASERES A veces se siente como que necesitamos un megáfono para conseguir que nuestros hijos escuchen. Este video puede ayudar, sin requerir el megáfono.
TEASERIMAGE FA4EFE60-18CE-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Are You Listening?!
TITLEES ¡¿Me estás escuchando?!
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES A veces se siente como que necesitamos un megáfono para conseguir que nuestros hijos escuchen. Este video puede ayudar, sin requerir el megáfono.
TWITTERTWEET Sometimes it feels like we need a megaphone to get our kids to listen. This video from @EducationNation can help.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 9045B060-5484-11E4-ADC90050569A5318
2 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Mother Daughter Walking and Talking

Charlas difíciles: cómo hablar de sexo con tu hijo

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1FqXTKp
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>It’s a question that can pop up innocently at a young age, “Where do babies come from?” but it can turn into an awkward conversation for all involved rather quickly. The birds and the bees talk may be one of the most important conversations you have with your child, but it can also be one of the hardest. It doesn’t have to be. There are ways to weave the conversation into everyday life. Resources are available to help when you can’t find the right words. We spoke to a panel of our Parent Toolkit experts to get their advice on how to make the sex talk a bit easier.</p> <blockquote>“You don’t call it your elbow-y so don’t call it your pee pee,” parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba says. “It sets the tone to the child that this is different than another body part.”</blockquote> <p>The majority of the experts we spoke to recommended starting the talks as early as possible, when children are exploring their bodies, and giving them the proper words for their body parts. And as uncomfortable as it can be, the best thing to do is to remain calm.</p> <blockquote>“If you look embarrassed, they’ll feel embarrassed,” explains Dr. Borba. “Kids know when you’re uncomfortable and they’ll conclude that was an inappropriate talk.”</blockquote> <p>If you need a little help, there are resources to give you the words that may not come naturally. For younger kids, education consultant Jennifer Miller recommends books like <em>Who Has What: All About Girls’ and Boys’ Bodies. </em>For older kids, there are always sex education classes, usually given in 4th or 5th grades. Most schools send home information about the class, and some even encourage you to watch the videos or talk with the teacher ahead of time. Try to remember that not every talk needs to be a lecture.</p> <blockquote>“If you look closely, you will find that there will be natural entry points to start these discussions,” says Miller. “It doesn’t have to be a dramatic sit-down conversation, but a drip of info as they encounter different issues and situations.”</blockquote> <p>Finding teachable moments is key. Maybe someone in your family is having a baby, or there’s a story on the news about an older woman giving birth to triplets. Whenever you see your child’s curiosity peak, it’s an opportunity to start talking.</p> <p>“It’s so much better if there’s a natural way to weed it in,” says Dr. Borba. But she also warns timing is important. “Realize sexual activity with kids is starting younger and younger. If you wait to sit down with your 16-year-old, they’ll tell you more than you know.”</p> <p>The earlier you discuss the topic with your child, the better. According to the CDC, 30 percent of 9th graders report having had sex. For 12th graders, that number jumps to 64 percent. Dr. Borba recommends having the talk your mother had with you at 16, at an earlier age of 13.</p> <p>“When you actually describe the mechanics of sexual intercourse, that’s 5 minutes,” says Kansas City-based pediatrician Dr. Natasha Burgert. “The religious values or personal values or decision making are discussions you’re having all the time.”</p> <p>Part of having the talk about sex and relationships is understanding where you as a family place your values and morals. Dr. Borba says that no one should tell you what to say to your kids about values, but you must communicate the values of your family when your children are young. And research shows that your values can have a big impact. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the most common reason teens gave for not having sex was that it was “against religion or morals.”</p> <blockquote>"I really don’t think it’s the sex talk that’s the big deal,” explains Dr. Burgert. “What I want to know is -- are you talking to your sons about how to appropriately treat a woman, or a man, that they’re with? Are you talking to daughters about having the self confidence about saying yes or no? These are the bigger conversations than penis and vagina.”</blockquote> <p>In fact, research from the Department of Health and Human Services shows that nearly two out of three female teenagers talked to their parents about “how to say no to sex,” compared with about two out of five male teenagers.</p> <p>“As a mother of three sons, that was a conversation we had,” says Dr. Borba. “If a girl says no, she means no. We say it to our daughters, but we also need to say it to our sons.”</p> <blockquote>It’s a topic that mother of two and adviser to the Parent Toolkit, Mercedes Sandoval covered with both her children...In 4th and 5th grades, girls tend to get a little boy crazy,” explains Sandoval. “I wanted to make sure my daughter knew how to interact with boys and we talked about where her boundaries are.”</blockquote> <p>But the best way you can offer your child support to develop the self-confidence to make her own decisions is to always keep the lines of communication open. If you start talking young, your child will be more likely to come to you. If you didn’t start young, it’s never too late to have those conversations. Above all, it seems the best way to talk to your children about sex is to be open, honest, and ongoing. And remember, if they don’t hear it from you, they’ll hear it somewhere else.</p> <blockquote>“Kids are going to find ways to do things if they want to do them; you have to have some sort of touch point in that,” explains Dr. Burgert. “Even if you don’t like the behavior, you can choose to at least be a sounding post to keep them safe. You may not like the decisions they make, but you still need to keep them safe.”</blockquote> <p><em>This is the first post in our week-long series — Tough Talks— where we’ve surveyed a handful of our Parent Toolkit experts to see what they recommend for parents to make tough conversations go more smoothly. Tomorrow we’ll tackle the topic of <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=45032A80-5879-11E4-ADC90050569A5318">divorce</a>. </em></p>
BODYES <p>“¿De dónde vienen los bebés?”, una pregunta inocente que puede surgir en cualquier momento pero que rápidamente incomoda a todos. La historia de mamá, papá y la semillita tal vez sea una de las conversaciones más importantes que tendrás con tus hijos, pero también puede ser una de las más difíciles. No tiene que ser así. Existen varias formas de incluir el tema en la vida cotidiana, y hay una variedad de recursos para cuando no puedes encontrar las palabras correctas. Pedimos consejos a nuestro panel de expertos de Parent Toolkit para que hablar de sexo con nuestros hijos sea más sencillo.</p> <blockquote>La experta en crianza, la Dra. Michele Borba, nos dice: “Si no le dices codito, entonces no lo llames pitito. Al hacer esto le estás diciendo al niño que es distinto a cualquier otra parte del cuerpo”.</blockquote> <p>Conoce más formas en las que puedes ayudar al desarrollo social y emocional de tu hijo y hablar sobre estos importantes temas.</p> <p>La mayoría de los expertos con los que hablamos recomiendan comenzar a tratar este tema lo antes posible, cuando los niños empiezan a explorar sus cuerpos, y enseñarles las palabras correctas para cada una de las partes del cuerpo. Y aunque te sientas sumamente incómodo, lo mejor que puedes hacer es mantener la calma.</p> <blockquote>“Si te ves avergonzado, tu hijo sentirá vergüenza”, explica la Dra. Borba. “Los niños se dan cuenta cuando uno se siente incómodo y llegarán a la conclusión de que el tema es poco decoroso”.</blockquote> <p>Si te resulta difícil, estas son algunas herramientas que te ayudarán a encontrar las palabras adecuadas cuando no surjan de manera natural. Para los niños más pequeños, la consultora en educación Jennifer Mills recomienda libros tales como Who Has What: All About Girls’ and Boys’ Bodies (Quién tiene qué: todo lo que debes saber sobre los cuerpos de las niñas y los niños). Para los niños más grandes, generalmente en 4.º o 5.º grado comienzan a dictarse clases de educación sexual. La mayoría de las escuelas envían a los padres información sobre los temas que se trataron en clase, y algunas incluso recomiendan mirar los videos o hablar antes con el docente. Recuerda que estas charlas no tienen que ser un sermón.</p> <blockquote>“Si prestas atención, verás que siempre surgen momentos espontáneos donde se puede tratar el tema”, dice Miller. “No debes transformarlo en una ocasión solemne, tienes que ir dándoles la información en pequeñas dosis a medida que se presentan diferentes situaciones”.</blockquote> <p>La clave es encontrar los momentos pedagógicos. Tal vez alguien en la familia está por tener un bebé, o en el noticiero cuentan sobre una mujer mayor que tuvo trillizos. Cuando veas que la curiosidad de tu hijo se despierta, esa es la oportunidad que buscabas.</p> <blockquote>“Siempre es mejor si el tema surge naturalmente”, explica la Dra. Borba, pero también nos advierte que el momento y la ocasión también son importantes. “El inicio de la actividad sexual es cada vez a edades más tempranas. Si esperas hasta que tu hijo tenga 16 años, será él quien te enseñe a ti”.</blockquote> <p>Cuanto antes hables sobre este tema con tu hijo, mejor será. Según los CDC (Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades), el 30% de los alumnos de 9.º grado manifestó haber tenido relaciones sexuales. Entre los alumnos de 12.º grado, esa cifra aumenta hasta el 64%. La Dra. Borba recomienda que la charla que antes tenías con tu hijo a los 16 años ahora sea a los 13 años.</p> <blockquote>“Cuando describes el proceso de una relación sexual, no demoras más de 5 minutos”, nos cuenta la Dra. Natasha Burgert, pediatra de Kansas City. “Los valores religiosos o personales o la toma de decisiones son temas sobre los que siempre hablas”.</blockquote> <p>Poder tener esta charla sobre el sexo y las relaciones les permitirá también analizar qué importancia dan como familia a sus valores y principios morales. La Dra. Borba aclara que solo tú decides qué le dirás a tus hijos con respecto a los valores, pero sí debes transmitirles tus valores familiares desde que son pequeños, y las investigaciones demuestran que esto es de gran importancia para el futuro de tus hijos. Según los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades, una de las razones más frecuentes que esgrimieron los adolescentes para no tener relaciones sexuales es que “van en contra de la religión o la moral”.</p> <blockquote>“En realidad, no creo que hablar sobre sexo sea lo más importante”, explica la Dra. Burgert. “Lo que me interesa saber es... ¿le estás enseñando a tus hijos a tratar bien a la mujer o al hombre con el que están? ¿Estás hablando con tus hijas sobre lo importante que es tener confianza en ellas mismas para poder decir “sí” o “no”? Estos temas son mucho más importantes que hablar sobre el pene o la vagina”.</blockquote> <p>De hecho, una investigación del Departamento de Salud y Servicios Sociales confirma que casi 2 de cada 3 adolescentes mujeres hablaron con sus padres sobre “cómo decirle no al sexo”, en comparación con casi 2 de cada 5 adolescentes hombres.</p> <p>“Soy madre de tres varones, y hemos tenido esa conversación”, cuenta la Dra. Borba. “Si una chica dice que no, quiere decir no. Se lo explicamos a nuestras hijas, pero también tenemos que explicárselo a nuestros hijos”.</p> <blockquote>Mercedes Sandoval, asesora de Parent Toolkit y madre de dos, también habló sobre este tema con sus hijos...En 4.º y 5.º grado, las niñas suelen enloquecer un poco por los chicos”, explica Sandoval. “Quería estar segura de que mi hija supiera cómo interactuar con los varones y hablamos sobre cuáles son sus límites”.</blockquote> <p>Pero la mejor herramienta que le puedes dar a tus hijos para desarrollar su autoconfianza para que puedan tomar sus propias decisiones es mantener siempre un diálogo fluido con ellos. Si comienzan a hablar sobre temas importantes desde que son pequeños, es muy probable que tu hijo recurra a ti en busca de consejo. Si este no ha sido el caso, nunca es tarde para comenzar. La mejor forma de hablar con tus hijos sobre sexo es ser abierto, honesto y hacerlo en forma regular. Y recuerda, si no se enteran por ti, se enterarán en otra parte.</p> <blockquote>“Los niños siempre encuentran la forma de hacer las cosas si quieren hacerlas, así que debes buscar algún punto de encuentro con ellos”, explica la Dra Burgert. “Aun si no estás de acuerdo con su conducta, al menos puedes optar por ser un puente que los mantendrá a salvo. Pueden no gustarte las decisiones que tomen, pero tienes que cuidarlos de todos modos”.</blockquote> <p>Esta es la primera publicación de nuestra serie semanal, Charlas difíciles, donde consultamos a nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones para que los padres puedan hablar en forma más cómoda sobre estos temas espinosos. Mañana trataremos el tema del divorcio.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,D59C3EA2-5056-9A4B-6C3BBA94D8F1485C,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
CMLABEL Tough Talks: Having the "Sex Talk" With Your Child
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED [empty string]
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:43:59.263
DESCRIPTION Here is some advice on making the birds and bees talk a little less awkward for you and your child.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about how to talk about sex with your kids:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Are you dreading talking about the birds and the bees with your kids? Here are some tips on making the conversation a bit easier to have.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Tough Talks: Having the "Sex Talk" With Your Child
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID FB58AD10-5607-11E4-ADC90050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC D59C3EA2-5056-9A4B-6C3BBA94D8F1485C
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-10-20 10:30:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Talk to Kids About Sex
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE How to Talk to Your Kids About Sex
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER It’s a question that can pop up innocently at a young age, “Where do babies come from?” but it can turn into an awkward conversation for all involved rather quickly.
TEASERES Pedimos consejos a nuestro panel de expertos de Parent Toolkit para que hablar de sexo con nuestros hijos sea más sencillo.
TEASERIMAGE 4E7A7C10-1944-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Tough Talks: Having the "Sex Talk" With Your Child
TITLEES Charlas difíciles: cómo hablar de sexo con tu hijo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Dreading talking about the birds & the bees with your kids? Here are some tips to make the talk less awkward:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

graduation

Cómo Dejarlos Ir

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>You’ve raised them, fed them, taught them, and now it’s time to let them go. Your “baby” is now a young adult, and they’re striking out on their own. It’s normal for you both to feel a range of different emotions. You may be sad, excited, proud, and terrified all at the same time. But as hard as it may be, letting go is the right –and healthy—thing for both of you.</p> <p>“We’re mammals,” points out Julie Lythcott-Haims, the former dean of freshmen at Stanford University. “Even though we wear clothing and carry cell phones, like every other mammal parent we need to raise offspring who can fend for themselves out in the world without us. Let’s not lose sight of the fact that our job as parents is actually to put ourselves out of a job.”</p> <p>If you’re finding the transition hard, or even if you’re not, keeping a few things in mind can make the process feel a little less overwhelming. </p>
BODYES <p>Los criaste, les diste de comer, les enseñaste muchas cosas y ahora llegó el momento de dejarlos ir. Tu “bebé” ahora es un adulto joven, y está iniciando su propio camino. Es normal que ambos sientan emociones encontradas. Podrán sentirse tristes, entusiasmados, orgullosos y aterrados, todo al mismo tiempo. Pero por más difícil que parezca, dejarlo ir es la opción correcta y saludable para los dos.</p> <p>“Somos mamíferos”, señala Julie Lythcott-Haims, exdecana de estudiantes de primer año en Stanford University. “Aunque usemos ropa y hablemos por celular, al igual que cualquier otro mamífero necesitamos criar seres que puedan valerse en el mundo por sí solos. No perdamos de vista que nuestro trabajo como padres es, en verdad, ir abandonando ese trabajo”.</p> <p>Si esta transición te resulta difícil, o aunque no sea el caso, tener presentes algunas cuestiones puede hacer que el proceso sea menos abrumador.</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204
CMLABEL How to Let Go
CREATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-06 19:01:53.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:04.807
DESCRIPTION You’ve raised them, fed them, taught them, and now it’s time to let them go. Your “baby” is now a young adult, and they’re striking out on their own.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in this advice about how to let your young adult go as they begin out on their own.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT You’ve raised them, fed them, taught them, and now it’s time to let them go. Your “baby” is now a young adult, and they’re striking out on their own.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL How to Let Go
LASTUPDATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0617E400-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-06 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Let Go
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE How to Let Go
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER You’ve raised them, fed them, taught them, and now it’s time to let them go. Your “baby” is now a young adult, and they’re striking out on their own.
TEASERES Si esta transición te resulta difícil, o aunque no sea el caso, tener presentes algunas cuestiones puede hacer que el proceso sea menos abrumador.
TEASERIMAGE A6774710-214E-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE How to Let Go
TITLEES Cómo Dejarlos Ir
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET You’ve raised them, fed them, taught them, and now it’s time to let them go. Take our advice at @educationnation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 A6769400-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
2 FAB050B0-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
3 C09BDBF0-13F3-11E7-9E040050569A4B6C
4 C08CC7F0-1B1E-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
5 E2524220-1B1E-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
6 F4090490-1B1E-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 31FB78E0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
2 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Teenage Girls Gossiping

Cómo preparar a tus hijos para los amienemigos de la escuela intermedia. Qué hacer y qué no hacer

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2b9vEL1
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>You’ve bought the binders, the books, and the backpack. But buying supplies and adjusting bedtime schedules aren’t the only preparations you should be making for the start of middle school.</p> <p>It’s time to prepare for the social “blind side.”</p> <p>A social blind side is when, at some point during middle school, your child will be faced with one of the following scenarios: the realization that a friend is really a frenemy; that the whispers in the hall are about him; that she wasn’t invited – <em>didn’t even know about</em> - the birthday party she saw on Instagram.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=E111C8E0-1CF2-11E4-826A0050569A5318" target="_blank"><strong>RELATED: 6th Grade Social Awareness Growth Charts</strong></a></p> <h4>Preparing Your Child</h4> <p>The painful thing about being blindsided is - as the name indicates – your child didn’t see it coming. So how do you prepare for the unexpected?</p> <p>Even though you don’t know <em>when</em> or <em>how</em> a blind side will occur, part of your preparation is telling your kids that at some point, it likely <em>will</em> happen.</p> <p>While you might be hesitant about introducing a worry before it happens, normalizing this experience is important so kids know that if (when) it does happen, it’s not because they’re weird or they did something wrong.</p> <p>Try sharing stories about things that happened when you were in middle school. You may even want to change personal stories to be about “a kid you knew” so your child isn’t afraid to talk openly without criticizing or questioning you.</p> <p><strong>Why Do Social Blind Sides Happen So Frequently In Middle School?</strong></p> <p style="text-align: left;">At about age 11, kids begin the important but messy process of developing an identity apart from their parents. To become a healthy adult, they need to figure out who they are, what they believe in, and what they like as individuals. They no longer like everything that you like. They practice not looking like you, or thinking like you, or behaving like you. It’s why we start to see so much rebellion in middle school, although it’s not so much rebellion as it is trial-and-error. I call middle school “The buffet of life” because it’s a time when kids start trying new things to see what suits them. Of course, they make a lot of mistakes. Some are harmless, like changing the way they dress. Some hurt, like dumping a friend in an effort to belong to a new group.</p> <p style="text-align: left;"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/139390153?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="600" height="337.2" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <h4>Preparing Yourself</h4> <p>Aside from prepping your child for the eventuality that a blind side may occur, the best thing you can do as a parent is be prepared for the aftermath. The social blind side will make you want to jump to your child’s rescue, but according to many middle schoolers, a parent’s help often backfires.</p> <p>Each year, I host three <a href="http://michelleinthemiddle.com/mother-daughter-conference/">mother-daughter conferences</a> for girls headed to middle school and their moms. During our breakout session, the girls share their thoughts on how they wish their moms would help them with this painful, if very common, middle school issue.</p> <p>Straight from the experts themselves, here is a list of “Dos” and  “Don’ts” middle schoolers want you to know when they run into friend trouble.</p> <h4>“Mom or Dad, PLEASE...”</h4> <p><strong>"...Don’t call the other parent."</strong></p> <p>“My mom will call the other mom to say her daughter did something wrong, but then that just makes it worse because they think I told my mom to call. It’s so embarrassing.” Involving other parents may seem like a good idea because it can correct behavior in the short run, but tweens need to manage friendship issues, even the ugly ones, on their own. Having a parent intervene doesn’t make the situation less painful or make your child more socially confident. Think of it this way: If you confided in a co-worker that you were having trouble with a colleague, how would you feel if your co-worker called the boss behind your back to fix things? It’s undermining and demeaning. The same goes for calling the school. (Reserve this step only for matters of repeated targeting by a bully.)</p> <p><strong><em>What to do instead:</em> </strong>Help your child brainstorm ways she would feel better responding the next time something bad happens with her frenemy. These might range from ‘ignoring it and hanging out with Mom instead’ to ‘questioning the other person about her hurtful behavior.’ Let your child contribute his or her own ideas to the list as you listen non-judgmentally. Running into friendship trouble can make tweens feel helpless, but coming up with personal solutions is a great way to restore feelings of capability and confidence.</p> <h4><strong>"...DON’T talk to the other kid."</strong></h4> <p>“My Mom will sit us both down and say, ‘You two have been friends forever. Can’t you work this out?’ And that never works.” The way your child and their frenemy behave in front of you is not the same way they behave when they’re alone. Your request for better behavior won’t impact how they act privately. Also remember that kids grow and change during middle school, just as friendships do. Just because they’ve been friends forever doesn’t mean they’ll be friends right now.</p> <p><strong><em>What to do instead:</em></strong> Help your child think critically, and hopefully unemotionally, about the situation. Remember, this isn’t your problem, so try not to take it personally, no matter how offended you may be for your kid! Instead, keep the focus on supporting your child by helping them figure out how <em>they</em> want to handle it and voicing your reassurance. (According to the kids I work with, going out for ice cream together never hurt either.)</p> <h4>"...DON’T tell your friends."</h4> <p>“I hate it when I hear my mom talking about it with her friends. I don’t even want her to tell my family until I say it’s okay.” Tweens and teens are rightfully sensitive and embarrassed about their personal lives. It’s all new territory and though watching them learn to navigate their new friendships may be fascinating, adorable, cringe-inducing, or painful, we should only be observers, not commentators.</p> <p><strong><em>What to do instead:</em></strong> Ask permission before you share any information with anyone else, including your spouse. You’re modeling how to have good relations, after all, and respecting privacy is an excellent place to start.</p> <h4><strong>"</strong>...DON’T make excuses for the other person."</h4> <p><strong> </strong>“My mom will try to explain why someone is acting a certain way, like ‘oh, maybe she just had a bad day today’ or ‘maybe it’s because her parents are going through a hard time.’ But that doesn’t make it any easier when my friend is being mean to me.”</p> <p><strong><em>What to do instead:</em></strong> In the pain of rejection, it’s hard to learn a moral lesson about what motivates people to behave badly. What most people need when they feel hurt is empathy above all else. Leave logic, psychology, and reasoning for later. Try saying something like, “That must feel terrible. I’m sorry you’re going through this.”</p> <h4><strong>"...DON’T talk about it too much."</strong></h4> <p><strong> </strong>“My mom will bring it up at every meal to make sure I’m okay. I just want her to stop acting like it’s the most important thing.” Be careful – too much attention to the problem and you can over-victimize your child.</p> <p><strong><em>What to do instead:</em></strong> Be sure to express support for your child and make sure they know you’re there to listen, then touch base once later to remind them you’re still available. After that, give them time to process this on their own. You may be making it into a bigger deal than it needs to be. Kids sometimes say that spending time <em>near </em>their parents is better than talking. Lots of them said, “I just want them to sit by me on the couch and watch TV.” Your reassuring presence in their lives might just be enough.</p> <h4>"...DON’T blow it off." </h4> <p><strong> </strong>“She always says ‘It’s not that a big of a deal, or, ‘There could be bigger problems.’ I know it’s not cancer or anything but it still isn’t good.”  You may be trying to avoid adding salt to your child’s wound, or trying to teach them to be less sensitive, but your child wants a little bit of empathy first and foremost. </p> <p><strong><em>What to do instead:</em></strong> Try saying something like “I’m here for you, and I might be able to help you think through this. If you want some advice, we can talk about it as soon as you’re ready. You just let me know.” Kids agreed that they really liked it when their parents asked them whether they wanted advice.</p> <p>Your own memories of being blindsided in middle school may cause you anxiety about sending your child off to the same inevitable fate. But if you understand why blindsides happen and how to react when they do, both you and your child will get through it more quickly and with a lot less pain.</p> <p><em>Michelle Icard is an author, speaker and educator helping parents, teachers and kids love middle school. For more tips on navigating the middle school years, read Michelle’s book, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Middle-School-Makeover-Improving-Experience/dp/1937134970">Middle School Makeover: Improving The Way You and Your Child Experience The Middle School Years.</a></em></p> <p><em><em>This piece is part of a week-long series with tips for how parents can help their kids survive middle school. Check out Sunday's post about <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=29315870-63E1-11E6-A4B10050569A5318" target="_blank">middle schooler's developing brians</a>. More to come each day this week!</em></em></p>
BODYES <p>Ya has comprado las carpetas, los libros y la mochila. Pero comprar los útiles escolares y reajustar la hora de ir a dormir no es lo único que debes preparar antes de iniciar la escuela intermedia.</p> <p>Es momento de prepararse para el “lado oculto” de lo social.</p> <p>¿Qué es este lado oculto? Bien, en algún momento durante la escuela intermedia tus hijos se enfrentarán alguna de estas situaciones: darse cuenta de que un amigo en realidad es en amienemigo; que los rumores en el pasillo tratan sobre ellos o que no los invitaron (<em>“ni siquiera sabían que se hacía”</em>) a la fiesta de cumpleaños y que luego vieron en Instagram.</p> <p><strong>Cómo preparar a tu hijo</strong></p> <p>Lo más doloroso de ser tomado por sorpresa es que, como bien lo dice la frase, tu hijo no la vio venir. Entonces ¿cómo prepararse para lo inesperado?</p> <p>Aún cuando no sepas <em>cuándo</em> o <em>cómo</em> ocurrirá, parte de la preparación consiste en decirle a tus hijos que en algún momento es probable que <em>pase</em>.</p> <p>Si bien puedes tener dudas sobre lo acertado de plantear una preocupación antes de que ocurra, normalizar esta experiencia es importante para que los niños sepan que si ocurre (y cuando ocurra) no será porque ellos son raros o hicieron algo malo.</p> <p>Intenta compartir historias sobre cosas que te hayan ocurrido mientras estabas en la escuela intermedia. Incluso, puedes cambiar un poco los personajes y que la historia sea sobre “un chico que conocía” para que tu hijo pueda hablar abiertamente, sin temor a criticarte o cuestionarte.</p> <p><strong>¿Por qué estas situaciones son tan habituales en la escuela intermedia?</strong></p> <p>A partir de los 11 años, los niños comienzan a transitar el importante y conflictivo proceso de desarrollar una identidad separada de sus padres. Para convertirse en adultos saludables, necesitan descubrir quiénes son, en qué creen y cómo son como individuos. Ya no les gustan las mismas cosas que a ti. Ya no tratan de imitarte, de pensar o de comportarse como tú. Es debido a todo esto que durante la escuela intermedia comenzamos a ver tanta rebeldía aunque, más que nada, se trata de ensayo y error. Me gusta describir a la escuela intermedia como “el bufet de la vida”, porque es una etapa en la que los niños comienzan a probar nuevas cosas para descubrir lo que se ajusta a sus gustos. Por supuesto, cometen montones de errores. Algunos son inofensivos, como cambiar su forma de vestir; y otros son dolorosos, como dejar de lado a un amigo por tratar de pertenecer a un nuevo grupo.</p> <p><strong>Cómo prepararte</strong></p> <p>Además de preparar a tus hijos para la eventualidad de que ocurra algún imprevisto, lo mejor que puedes hacer como padre es estar preparado para las consecuencias, lo que sigue al desastre. Todos los padres queremos salir de inmediato al rescate pero, según cuentan varios estudiantes, la ayuda de los padres muchas veces resulta contraproducente.</p> <p>Todos los años organizo tres conferencias para madres e hijas, especialmente pensadas para las niñas que inician la escuela intermedia y sus mamás. Durante los talleres, las niñas comparten sus opiniones sobre cómo les gustaría que sus madres las ayudaran a atravesar estos momentos dolorosos y tan habituales.</p> <p>Esta es una lista de “qué hacer”y “qué no hacer” elaborada por los expertos, los alumnos de escuela intermedia, para cuando se encuentran en problemas con sus amigos.</p> <p><strong>“Mamá/Papá, POR FAVOR...</strong></p> <p><strong>... No llames a los padres del otro” .</strong></p> <p>“Mi mamá llamaría a la otra mamá para decirle que su hija hizo algo malo, pero eso empeora las cosas, porque creen que yo le pedí a mi mamá que llamara. Es muy incómodo”. Involucrar a los otros padres parece ser una buena idea porque, en el corto plazo, puede corregir la conducta, pero los preadolescentes necesitan lidiar ellos mismos con sus problemas con los amigos, incluso los más graves. La intervención de los padres no mitiga el dolor que causa la situación, ni permite que tu hijo sea más seguro en otras situaciones sociales. Considéralo en estos términos: le confiaste a un compañero de trabajo que estabas teniendo problemas con otro colega, ¿cómo te sentirías si tu compañero hablara con el jefe a tus espaldas para que solucione las cosas? Te sientes humillado y que te quita autoridad. Lo mismo pasa cuando llamas a la escuela. (Reserva este paso solo para los casos de <em>bullying</em>).</p> <p><em><strong>Qué hacer entonces:</strong></em> ayuda a tu hija a encontrar formas que le permitan sentirse mejor la próxima vez que tenga que reaccionar ante algo malo que pase con su <em>amienemiga</em>. Estas soluciones pueden variar desde el “ignórala y pasa el rato con mamá” hasta el “pregúntale por qué tiene actitudes tan hirientes”. Permite que tu hija aporte sus propias ideas mientras tú las escuchas sin criticar. Cuando tienen problemas con sus amigos, los preadolescentes se sienten indefensos, pero encontrar una solución personal es una excelente forma de restablecer la confianza.</p> <p><strong>... NO hables con el otro niño”.</strong></p> <p>“Mi mamá nos agarraría a los dos y nos diría ‘Son amigos hace años, ¿no pueden solucionar esto?’ Y eso nunca funciona”. La conducta de tu hijo y su <em>amienemigo</em> frente a ti no es la misma que tienen cuando están solos. Pedirles que se porten mejor no cambiará la forma en que actúan de manera privada. Recuerda que los niños crecen y cambian durante la escuela intermedia, al igual que las amistades. Solo porque hace años que son amigos no significa que ahora lo serán.</p> <p><em><strong>Qué hacer entonces:</strong> </em>ayuda a tu hijo a analizar la situación en forma crítica y sin dejar que lo afecte. Recuerda, no es tu problema, así que trata de no tomarlo como algo personal, ¡no importa lo ofendido que te sientas por lo que le ocurre a tu hijo! Trata de mantenerte enfocado y ayuda a tu hijo a descubrir cómo ellos pueden resolver el problema y expresa tu confianza. (Y según los niños con los que trabajo, ir a tomar un helado juntos tampoco daña a nadie).</p> <p><strong>... NO le cuentes a tus amigos”.</strong></p> <p>“Odio que mi mamá le cuente a sus amigas. Ni siquiera quiero que se lo cuente a la familia hasta que yo le dé permiso”. Los preadolescentes y los adolescentes están legítimamente sensibles y avergonzados de su vida personal. Es un territorio nuevo y, aunque ver cómo aprenden a manejar sus nuevas amistades nos resulta fascinante, adorable, doloroso o nos da vergüenza ajena, debemos ser espectadores únicamente, y no comentaristas.</p> <p><em><strong>Qué hacer entonces:</strong></em> pide permiso antes de compartir cualquier información con otras personas, incluso con tu pareja. Estás enseñándole a tus hijos a mantener buenas relaciones y, después de todo, respetar la privacidad es un excelente ejemplo para comenzar.</p> <p><strong>... NO justifiques al otro”.</strong></p> <p>“Mi mamá siempre trata de justificar por qué alguien se comporta de tal o cual manera, entonces dice: “oh, bueno, tal vez tuvo un mal día” o “tal vez es porque sus padres están pasando por momentos difíciles”. Pero eso no significa que para mi sea más fácil cuando mi amigo se porta mal conmigo”.</p> <p><em><strong>Qué hacer entonces:</strong> </em>el dolor que nos causa el rechazo nos impide ver qué cosas motivan a los demás a portarse mal. Cuando una persona se siente herida, lo que más necesita es la empatía. La lógica, la psicología y el raciocinio vienen después. Intenta consolar a tu hijo diciéndole: “Debes sentirte muy mal. Lamento que tengas que pasar por esta situación”.</p> <p><strong>... NO hables mucho del tema”.</strong></p> <p>“Mi mamá hablará del tema cada vez que pueda para asegurarse de que estoy bien, pero lo único que quiero es que deje de actuar como eso si fuera lo más importante del mundo”. Ten cuidado, poner mucha atención en el problema puede victimizar aún más a tu hijo.</p> <p><em><strong>Qué hacer entonces:</strong> </em>expresa tu apoyo y asegúrate de que sepa que cuenta contigo. Pasado algún tiempo, menciona el tema otra vez para recordarle que estás disponible para ayudarlo. Luego, dale tiempo para que lo procese por sí mismo. Tal vez le estés dando al tema más importancia de la que merece. Los niños dicen que a veces pasar tiempo<em> junto</em> a sus padres es mejor que charlar con ellos. Muchos dicen: “Solo quiero que nos sentemos a mirar la TV”. Tu presencia tranquilizadora puede ser más que suficiente.</p> <p><strong>... NO lo minimices”.</strong></p> <p>“Mi mamá siempre me dice ‘no es para tanto’ o ‘hay problemas más graves’. Ya sé que no es un cáncer o algo así, pero de todas formas no es algo bueno”. Tal vez quieras evitar echar sal en la herida, o intentas enseñarle a no ser tan susceptible, pero lo que tu hijo busca, primero y principal, es un poco de empatía.</p> <p><em><strong>Qué hacer entonces:</strong> </em>puedes probar de decirle “Puedes contar conmigo, tal vez pueda ayudarte a encontrar una solución. Si quieres algún consejo, podemos hablar sobre el tema cuando tengas ganas. Solo tienes que avisarme”. Los niños coinciden: les gusta cuando sus padres les preguntan si quieren un consejo.</p> <p>Tus propios recuerdos y experiencias en la escuela intermedia pueden causarte ansiedad y temor de enviar a tu hijo hacia el mismo destino inevitable. Pero si tienes bien en claro que siempre puedes ser tomado por sorpresa, que estas cosas ocurren y sabes cómo reaccionar ante ellas, tanto tú como tu hijo podrán superarlas más rápidamente y sin sufrir tanto.</p> <p><em>Michelle Icard es una autora, oradora y educadora que ayuda a los padres, maestros y niños a amar la escuela intermedia. Para más consejos para esta etapa escolar, puedes leer el libro de Michelle, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Middle-School-Makeover-Improving-Experience/dp/1937134970">Middle School Makeover: Improving The Way You and Your Child Experience The Middle School Years</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Este artículo forma parte de una serie de publicaciones que se extenderá durante una semana, con consejos para padres de niños de escuela intermedia. Consulta la publicación del domingo sobre el desarrollo del cerebro de los alumnos de escuela intermedia. ¡Habrá novedades todos los días durante esta semana!</em></p>
CATHTML F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,2B6E9AC3-5056-9A4B-6C9D5F097BD5E027,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:29.417
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:37:10.903
DESCRIPTION Follow these tips from Parent Toolkit to help your kids deal with the emotional minefield of adolescence.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd enjoy this Parent Toolkit article on how parents can help their kids navigate the confusing challenges of middle school "frenemies".
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Parents can help their kids deal with the confusing emotions and friendship dynamics of adolescence with these tips from Parent Toolkit.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL 6 Do’s and Don’ts to Prepare Kids for Middle School Frenemies
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID F3E54300-63CE-11E6-A4B10050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B6E9AC3-5056-9A4B-6C9D5F097BD5E027
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-08-22 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 6 Do’s and Don’ts to Prepare Kids for Middle School Frenemies
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE 6 Do’s and Don’ts to Prepare Kids for Middle School Frenemies
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 6 Do’s and Don’ts to Prepare Kids for Middle School Frenemies
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER The middle school “social blind side” happens to all kids. How you react, and how you don’t, can make all the difference during this difficult social time.
TEASERES Ya has comprado las carpetas, los libros y la mochila. Pero comprar los útiles escolares y reajustar la hora de ir a dormir no es lo único que debes preparar antes de iniciar la escuela intermedia.
TEASERIMAGE F9C64D70-1A2E-11E7-874B0050569A4B6C
TITLE 6 Do’s and Don’ts to Prepare Kids for Middle School Frenemies
TITLEES Cómo preparar a tus hijos para los amienemigos de la escuela intermedia. Qué hacer y qué no hacer
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Help your kids handle middle school "Frenemies" with these six expert tips from @EducationNation:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 BCC36940-8B26-11E6-89870050569A5318

Tomar Decisiones de Manera Responsable

Tomar decisiones en forma responsable te permite hacer elecciones que son buenas para ti y para los demás. También se trata de tener en cuenta tus deseos y los de los demás.

dad and sad son
Consejos

Ver más

mom daughter play
Puntos de Referencia

Ver más

Teenagers Talking
Noticias

Ver más


Recomendado

brain

Lo que debes saber sobre el desarrollo del cerebro en un adulto joven

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Over the last decade or two, scientists have conducted new research in brain development with results having a potentially big impact on how we think about young adults. The emerging research has shown an increase in brain development that starts in adolescence and continues into the early 20s. This could mean that while we see 18-24 year olds as fully functioning adults, their brains haven’t reached their full maturity just yet.</p> <p>While most of the brain’s general architecture is developed in early childhood, the area of the brain that continues to mature through young adulthood is responsible for the sort of self-control that helps us make thoughtful decisions, delay gratification, and rein-in risk-taking. This doesn’t mean that young adults are incapable of making good decisions or that they have no control over themselves. What it means is that they must work harder than mature adults to stay focused, make responsible choices, and avoid risky behaviors.</p> <p>Neurologist Judy Willis says technology has changed the demands on brain development for kids born after the year 2000, leaving a disconnect between the brain they need and the brain they have. With the internet, smart phones, and 24/7 connectivity available for most teens, Willis says the developing brain is often overwhelmed by information overload. And while the brain is still developing, this can lead teens and young adults to appear unfocused, not goal-oriented, and to engage in risky behaviors.</p> <p>There is some debate among scientists about the conclusions that we can draw from the results of research on technology and the brain at this time. Regardless of the debate, neurologist Judy Willis says there are ways to support your young adult’s growing brain power and help them make the most of their opportunities and build the skills they need to meet the challenges they face.</p> <p><strong>Use Self-Management to Build Brain Strength </strong></p> <p>One of the breakthroughs in recent brain research involves neuroplasticity – the ability for the brain to change in response to experience. Think of the brain like any muscle, the more it is used, the stronger it becomes. By offering more ways for your young adult to exercise their decision-making skills and impulse control, they’ll be building brain strength.</p> <p>One way to do that is to encourage your teen’s independence and make sure your young adult takes responsibility for themselves. They should be picking their own classes, planning their own schedule, and handling their own workload. If they ask for your help with a problem, don’t solve it for them. Instead, ask them what they think they should do. If you think what they’re planning to do is wrong, simply asking “Is there another way you could handle this?” will help them identify other options. Temple University Psychology Professor Laurence Steinberg recommends encouraging students to reach out to advisors on campus if they need more help. If you give them all the answers or if you’re making decisions for them, they aren’t building these skills themselves.</p> <p> _insertContent=4ABDE880-1B21-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C_</p> <p>Another way to support their development is to encourage their goal-setting skills and impulse control. Meaning, their ability to focus on something they’d like to accomplish in the long-term and resist a temptation right now. This can also be thought of as their “true north” or “purpose.” Maybe they’re in school with the hopes of becoming a doctor, or they’re working two jobs to make ends meet while applying for a training program. Simply talking to them about their main goal, and the steps they plan on taking to realize that goal, can serve as a gentle reminder and may help them stay focused.</p> <p>_insertContent=11BFC750-2090-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C_</p> <p>Encouraging your young adult to be healthy in other areas of their life is also key to supporting development. Sleep, exercise, and nutrition are all important to promote brain health. Steinberg says mindfulness and meditation can also help in developing self-control. Next time you are with your young adult, take a yoga or meditation class together. It’s not only a great bonding experience, but could help your teen learn some strategies to support their development.</p> <p><strong>Discuss Substance Use and Effect </strong></p> <p>According to the <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/pdf/2015/ss6506_updated.pdf">Centers for Disease Control</a> and Prevention (CDC), the leading cause of death in young adulthood is unintentional injury, with the majority of deaths being caused by motor vehicle crashes. Later in life, you’re more likely to die from heart disease or cancer. While young adulthood can be a time of great growth, it can also be fraught with new peer pressure, experimentation with drugs and alcohol, and unintended consequences.</p> <p>While the brain is still developing the self-control area, the area of the brain that processes reward is still in overdrive. This process starts in adolescence but continues into the twenties. Steinberg says this is like having a car with a really great accelerator but poor brakes. Drugs and alcohol often also lower a user’s inhibitions, meaning they are more likely to engage in risky behavior like unprotected sex or driving under the influence. Adding substance use to a brain that is still developing can expose your young adult to dangerous situations. It’s important to talk with your young adult about their choices around substance use. For advice on having that conversation, take a look at our conversation starter <a href="/conversation-starter-article/tough-talks-how-to-talk-to-your-child-about-drugs-and-alcohol">5 Ways to Talk with Young Adults about Alcohol &amp; Drugs.</a></p>
BODYES <p>En la última década o dos, los científicos han realizado nuevas investigaciones sobre el desarrollo del cerebro, y los resultados podrían tener un gran impacto en cómo pensamos acerca de los adultos jóvenes. Estas investigaciones han demostrado un aumento en el desarrollo del cerebro que comienza en la adolescencia y continúa hasta poco después de los 20. Esto significa que si bien vemos a jóvenes de 18-24 años como adultos, sus cerebros aún no han alcanzado su maduración total.</p> <p>Mientras que la mayor parte de la arquitectura general del cerebro se desarrolla en la primera infancia, el área del cerebro que continúa madurando a lo largo de los primeros años de la adultez es la responsable del autocontrol que nos ayuda a tomar decisiones meditadas, a posponer la gratificación y a controlar los riesgos. Esto no quiere decir que los jóvenes sean incapaces de tomar buenas decisiones ni que no tengan control sobre sí mismos. Quiere decir que deben esforzarse más que los adultos maduros para mantener la concentración, tomar decisiones responsables y evitar conductas peligrosas.</p> <p>La neuróloga Judy Willis afirma que la tecnología ha modificado las exigencias en el desarrollo del cerebro para los jóvenes nacidos después del año 2000, dejando una desconexión entre el cerebro que necesitan y el que tienen. Con Internet, smartphones y conectividad las 24 horas a disposición de la mayoría de los adolescentes, Willis considera que el cerebro en desarrollo suele estar abrumado por la sobrecarga de información. Y mientras el cerebro aún se está desarrollando, es normal ver a adolescentes y jóvenes desconcentrados, sin objetivos y propensos a tener comportamientos peligrosos.</p> <p>En la actualidad, los científicos debaten sobre las conclusiones a las que podemos arribar a partir de los resultados de las investigaciones sobre la tecnología y el cerebro. Más allá de este debate, la neuróloga Judy Willis explica que hay formas de potenciar el cerebro en crecimiento de estos jóvenes y ayudarlos a aprovechar al máximo sus oportunidades y a desarrollar las habilidades que necesitan para enfrentar los distintos desafíos que se les presenten.</p> <p><strong>Recurre al autocontrol para fortalecer el cerebro</strong></p> <p>Uno de los hallazgos más destacados en las últimas investigaciones está relacionado con la neuroplasticidad, la habilidad que tiene el cerebro de cambiar en respuesta a una experiencia. Piensa en el cerebro como cualquier músculo, cuanto más se usa, más se fortalece. Si le das a tu hijo más oportunidades para ejercer sus habilidades de toma de decisiones y control de impulsos, estará fortaleciendo su cerebro.</p> <p>Una de las formas para lograrlo es estimular su independencia, y asegurarse de que es responsable de sus propios actos. Debería elegir sus propias clases, planificar su propio cronograma y manejar su carga de trabajo. Si te pide ayuda ante un problema, no lo resuelvas en su lugar. Pregúntale qué piensa hacer. Si te parece que su idea no es la mejor, solo pregúntale: “¿te parece que hay otra forma de resolverlo?”. Esto lo ayudará a identificar otras opciones. El profesor de Psicología de Temple University Laurence Steinberg recomienda impulsar a los estudiantes para que contacten a sus asesores en el campus si precisan más ayuda. Si le das todas las respuestas o si tomas decisiones por él, no podrán desarrollar estas habilidades por sí solos.</p> <p> _insertContent=4ABDE880-1B21-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C_</p> <p>Otra forma de contribuir con su desarrollo es estimular sus habilidades para establecer objetivos y controlar sus impulsos. Es decir, su habilidad para concentrarse en un objetivo que les gustaría alcanzar a largo plazo y resistir las tentaciones del presente. Puede pensarse como su “verdadero norte” o “propósito”. Quizá están en la escuela con la esperanza de ser médicos, o tienen dos trabajos para mantenerse económicamente mientras se postulan para un programa de capacitación. Simplemente hablar con ellos sobre su objetivo principal, y los pasos que piensan dar para alcanzar ese objetivo puede servir como un simple recordatorio y los puede ayudar a mantenerse enfocados.</p> <p>_insertContent=11BFC750-2090-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C_</p> <p>Estimular a tu hijo a que sea saludable en otras áreas de su vida también es clave para apoyar el desarrollo. El descanso, el ejercicio y la nutrición son igual de importantes para promover la salud del cerebro. Steinberg comenta que el <em>mindfulness</em> y la meditación pueden ayudar a desarrollar el autocontrol. La próxima vez que estés con tu hijo, tomen una clase de yoga o de meditación juntos. No solo será una experiencia que los unirá, sino que también podrá ayudarlo a conocer estrategias que contribuirán a su desarrollo.</p> <p><strong>Háblale sobre el consumo de drogas y sus efectos</strong></p> <p>Según los <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/pdf/2015/ss6506_updated.pdf">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention</a> (CDC), la principal causa de muerte en los jóvenes son los accidentes, y la mayoría de estas muertes son a causa de choques automovilísticos. En otra etapa más avanzada de la vida, es más probable que la causa de muerte sea por una enfermedad cardíaca o por cáncer. La fase de la juventud, además de caracterizarse por un gran crecimiento, también está acompañada de cierta presión de los pares, consumo de drogas y alcohol, y consecuencias inesperadas.</p> <p>Mientras que el cerebro aún está desarrollando un área de autocontrol, la zona del cerebro que procesa el sistema de recompensas está a toda máquina. Este proceso comienza en la adolescencia, pero continúa hasta después de los veinte. Steinberg lo compara con tener un auto con muy buena aceleración, pero frenos malos. Las drogas y el alcohol suelen desinhibir al que los consume, y, por lo tanto, son más propensos a actuar en forma peligrosa, como tener sexo sin protección o conducir bajo los efectos de las drogas o el alcohol. Agregarle drogas a un cerebro que aún se está desarrollando puede exponer a tu hijo a situaciones peligrosas. Es importante que hables con él acerca de sus opciones ante el consumo de drogas. Si deseas recibir asesoramiento para esa charla, lee nuestra guía <a href="/conversation-starter-article/tough-talks-how-to-talk-to-your-child-about-drugs-and-alcohol">5 formas de hablar con los jóvenes sobre alcohol y drogas.</a></p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4633AEF-5056-9A4B-6CFC734C17EE9A78,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
CMLABEL What You Need to Know About Young Adult Brain Development
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-06 18:43:36.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:30:24.56
DESCRIPTION There are ways to support your young adult’s growing brain power, make the most of their opportunities and build the skills they need to meet the challenges they face.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT There are ways to support your young adult’s growing brain power, make the most of their opportunities and build the skills they need to meet the challenges they face.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT There are ways to support your young adult’s growing brain power and help them make the most of their opportunities.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL What You Need to Know About Young Adult Brain Development
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 77B771A0-1B1A-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-30 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Young Adult Brain Development
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES Lo que debes saber sobre el desarrollo del cerebro
SOCIALTITLE Young Adult Brain Development
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER There are ways to support your young adult’s growing brain power to help them make the most of their opportunities.
TEASERES En la última década o dos, los científicos han realizado nuevas investigaciones sobre el desarrollo del cerebro.
TEASERIMAGE 41FC1310-1D8E-11E7-A4000050569A4B6C
TITLE What You Need to Know About Young Adult Brain Development
TITLEES Lo que debes saber sobre el desarrollo del cerebro en un adulto joven
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET There are ways to support your young adult’s growing brain power and help them make the most of their opportunities.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array
1 4ABDE880-1B21-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
2 11BFC750-2090-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318
2 3BA958D0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

obnoxious teen

La toma de riesgos y el cerebro de los adolescentes

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/10OIKTs
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>During adolescence, your child’s body matures and she becomes more self-sufficient and independent. These years also bring dramatic hormonal fluctuations, greater peer pressure, increased access to drugs, alcohol, sex, and the risk of unsafe driving practices. The problem is that the part of the brain that will in later years guide her logical thinking, judgment, prioritizing, and risk-assessment has yet to literally “get it together.” This can be a setup for disaster.</p> <p>The neural networksin the brain that will ultimately guide your child’s self-control and goal-directed behavior are called <em>executive functions</em>. These circuits are located in the prefrontal cortex, which is the last part of the brain to mature.</p> <p>Until your teen’s brain matures, which won’t happen until she’s well into her twenties, she may be more impulsive and less logic-driven. Decisions you consider unreasonable and behaviors you know are dangerous may not be seen that way by your teen because of her still-developing brain. This body over brain influence puts her at risk for engaging in perilous behaviors, such as driving while talking on her cell phone, texting, or when under the influence of drugs or alcohol.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Learn more about how you can support your teen's social and emotional development.</a></p> <p>Teenagers are three to four times more likely to die from risk-taking and accidents than non-elderly adults due to lapses in judgment and illogical decision-making. Adolescence is a critical time for you to help your teen build the self-awareness to resist and avoid high-risk behavior. Here are some strategies that can help you improve your adolescent’s judgment while her executive functions are still under construction.</p> <p><strong>Give Responsibilities:</strong> Give her opportunities to make choices, explore options, and learn from both the successes and authentic consequences of her choices. This means selecting responsibilities or decisions for her that are challenging, but where failure would not have harmful outcomes. If she asks for your advice, offer to be a supportive listener but not a director. The goal is for her to develop his judgment, so don’t jump in with corrections or advice. That will deprive her of owning the learning experience. Don’t chastise her if her outcome is unsuccessful. Rather, encourage her insights into what went wrong and what she might do differently next time.</p> <p><strong>Goal-Planning:</strong> Your adolescent also needs guidance to become aware of the potential consequences of his actions, and to resist making impulsive decisions or those based on peer influence. You can help him build these skill sets by providing opportunities for him to set personal goals and create a plan on how to achieve them. One way to do this is to ask him to write out a schedule of his plans that includes information about progress points and expectations. Join him in revisiting the plan periodically. Be positive and invite him to make adjustments. Explain to him that most professionals know that initial plans are just estimates and they plan for and make adjustments in response to their experiences along the way.</p> <p><strong>Decision-Making:</strong> Involve your teen in family decisions, like planning vacation activities, or coming up with community service ideas. In doing this, she can experience the satisfaction of planning the cost analysis, travel time, and schedule within a designated budget – such as a trip to a waterpark not far from your designated travel route.</p> <p><strong>Critical Analysis:</strong> Get your child involved in analyzing big decisions for the family. For instance, you can ask him to come up with the financial benefits of buying the family car that he wants. As you guide him to reliable consumer resources, he’ll have the “ah-ha” experience that not every advertisement is the absolute truth just because it appears to be presented as a fact.</p> <p><strong>Building Self-Control:</strong> Many teens are passionate about activities like video games and social media platforms, which can reduce their interest in academics, family time, and healthy eating and sleeping habits. If this sounds like your teen, you can use her passion as an opportunity to help your teen build self-control. Collaborate with her on a plan to cut back instead of just prohibiting any time spent at the pursuit. Help her find strategies to resist playing the game or going online whenever she feels like it with a planned schedule for use. With this approach you are building her skills of analyzing and recognizing the triggers or “risk factors” that limit her ability to resist temptation. This impulse control can lead to her decision not to read a text message when driving at a time when that choice literally saves her life.</p> <p><strong>Prioritize and Plan Ahead:</strong> Teachable moments are opportunities for building your child’s awareness of consequences. For example, if your teen forgets to mention he needs a poster board for a project until the night before it’s due, he’s showing his underdeveloped ability to prioritize. A teachable moment is lost if your teen experiences no <em>authentic </em>consequences for his failure to plan. Being grounded or losing privileges can be punishments, but this will not help build his brain’s ability to prioritize. He will learn more if you resist your desire to rescue him from a low grade and have him experience the real world consequences of his actions (or inaction) that are enforced by his teacher. Points off his grade now will have a direct impact on the planning, prioritizing, and goal-directed executive functions skills he needs for his next project and his future success. Just remind yourself these types of consequences will probably increase the likelihood that he will have a useable spare tire when he gets a late night flat on a rural road. </p> <p><em><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318">Judy Willis</a>, M.D., M.Ed. is a neurologist, former classroom teacher, and author of books for educators and parents. She is also one of the experts on the <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Social &amp; Emotional Development</a> section that was recently launched on the Parent Toolkit. </em></p>
BODYES <p>Durante la adolescencia, tu hijo madura y se vuelve más independiente y autosuficiente. Estos años también traen drásticos cambios hormonales, mayor presión de los pares, mayor acceso a las drogas, el alcohol y el sexo, y conductas de manejo imprudente. El problema es que la parte del cerebro que en el futuro guiará el pensamiento lógico, el juicio, el establecimiento de prioridades y la evaluación de riesgos todavía tiene que madurar. Y esto puede ser la receta para el desastre.</p> <p>Las redes neuronales del cerebro que regulan el autocontrol y la conducta orientada a objetivos se llaman <em>funciones ejecutivas</em>. Estos circuitos se encuentran en la corteza prefrontal, que es la última sección del cerebro en madurar.</p> <p>Hasta que el cerebro del adolescente madura, cosa que no ocurre hasta bien entrados los 20, será más impulsivo y menos lógico. Las decisiones que tú consideras irrazonables y las conductas que sabes que son peligrosas no son vistas de este modo por tu hijo adolescente porque su cerebro todavía está en desarrollo. Esta influencia del cuerpo sobre el cerebro los pone en riesgo, ya que ejecutan conductas peligrosas, como conducir mientras hablan por teléfono o envían mensajes de texto, o después de haber consumido drogas o alcohol.</p> <p>Los adolescentes tienen de tres a cuatro veces más probabilidades de morir a causa de la toma de riesgos y de los accidentes que los adultos no ancianos que incurren en lapsus de criterio y toman decisiones ilógicas. La adolescencia es un momento clave para que ayudes a tu hijo a desarrollar el conocimiento de sí mismo para resistirse y evitar las conductas de alto riesgo. Estas son algunas estrategias que pueden ayudarte a mejorar el criterio de tu hijo adolescente mientras sus funciones ejecutivas todavía están en desarrollo.</p> <p><strong>Asignación de responsabilidades:</strong> ofrécele a tu hijo la posibilidad de hacer elecciones, de explorar las opciones y de aprender tanto de los hechos como de las verdaderas consecuencias de sus elecciones. Esto significa seleccionar por ellos las responsabilidades o decisiones que presenten un desafío pero, que si tuvieran un resultado adverso, no serían perjudiciales. Si piden tu consejo, actúa como oyente y no como director. El objetivo es que desarrollen su criterio, de modo que no te precipites haciendo correcciones o dando consejos, ya que esto los privará de la experiencia de aprendizaje. No castigues a tu hijo si el resultado no es exitoso, más bien, aliéntalo a analizar qué fue lo que falló y qué podría hacer diferente la próxima vez.</p> <p><strong>Planificación de objetivos:</strong> tu hijo adolescente necesita un poco de orientación para poder darse cuenta de las posibles consecuencias de sus acciones y para resistirse a tomar decisiones impulsivas o influenciadas por sus pares. Puedes ayudarlo a desarrollar estas habilidades ofreciéndole la posibilidad de establecer objetivos personales y de desarrollar un plan para alcanzarlos. Una forma de lograr esto es pedirle que prepare una lista de sus planes y que incluya información sobre las etapas de progreso y las expectativas. Revisa este plan junto con tu hijo de manera periódica, intenta ser positivo y sugiérele hacer algunos ajustes. Explícale que la mayoría de los profesionales saben que los planes iniciales son solo una estimación, y que se van modificando y ajustando en respuesta al desarrollo de las experiencias.</p> <p><strong>Toma de decisiones:</strong> involucra a los adolescentes en las decisiones familiares, por ejemplo, planificar actividades durante las vacaciones o pensar en ideas para ayudar a la comunidad. Al hacer esto, los jóvenes experimentarán la sensación de satisfacción de analizar costos, planificar los tiempos de viaje y las actividades con un presupuesto limitado, por ejemplo, una visita a un parque acuático cercano al lugar donde viajarán.</p> <p><strong>Análisis crítico:</strong> haz que tus hijos participen en el análisis de las grandes decisiones familiares. Por ejemplo, puedes pedirle que investigue y analice los beneficios financieros de comprar ese auto que tanto quiere. Mientras lo guías y le indicas fuentes de información confiable, tu hijo atravesará la experiencia del descubrimiento, al darse cuenta de que no todas las publicidades son la verdad absoluta solo porque presentan las cosas como un hecho consumado.</p> <p><strong>Desarrollo del autocontrol:</strong> muchos adolescentes son apasionados de los videojuegos y de las redes sociales, lo que puede disminuir su interés en las actividades académicas, la familia, llevar una alimentación saludable o tener buenos hábitos de sueño. Si esto describe exactamente a tu hijo adolescente, puedes usar su pasión como una oportunidad para ayudarlo a desarrollar el autocontrol. En vez de prohibirle que realice esas actividades, consensúen un plan para reducir el tiempo que dedica a ellas. Ayúdale a encontrar estrategias que le permitan resistirse a jugar videojuegos o a conectarse a las redes sociales en cualquier momento, como por ejemplo un plan de actividades. Aplicando este enfoque, lo ayudarás a desarrollar sus habilidades de análisis y a reconocer los disparadores o “factores de riesgo” que limitan su capacidad para resistirse a la tentación. El control de los impulsos le permitirá tomar la decisión de no leer un mensaje de texto mientras está manejando, una elección que, literalmente, salvará su vida.</p> <p><strong>Priorización y planificación:</strong> los momentos que pueden ser aprovechados pedagógicamente son oportunidades que permiten crear conciencia sobre las consecuencias. Por ejemplo, si tu hijo se acuerda de avisarte de que necesita una cartulina para un proyecto la noche anterior a la fecha de entrega, no está mostrando la habilidad de priorizar. Se pierde la oportunidad pedagógica si tu hijo no experimenta las verdaderas consecuencias por su falta de planificación. Perder algunos privilegios o no poder salir con amigos pueden ser formas de castigarle, pero esto no ayudará a que su cerebro desarrolle la capacidad de asignar prioridades. Aprenderá mucho más si resistes tu deseo de salir al rescate para evitar que le pongan una mala nota y le permites experimentar las consecuencias de sus acciones (o inacción) en el mundo real, en este caso en la persona de su maestro. Recibir una nota más baja ahora tendrá un impacto directo en las funciones ejecutivas de planificación, priorización y consecución de objetivos que necesita para su próximo proyecto escolar y su éxito en el futuro. Solo tienes que recordar que este tipo de consecuencias probablemente incrementará las posibilidades de que contaremos con un neumático de repuesto en buenas condiciones cuando tengamos una pinchadura en un camino rural en medio de la noche.</p> <p><em>Judy Willis, M.D., M.Ed. es neuróloga, exmaestra y autora de libros para educadores y padres. También es una de las expertas que participa en la sección de Desarrollo social y emocional que hemos incorporado recientemente en Parent Toolkit.</em></p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY andyweishaar_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:08:10.703
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:59:38.723
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Risk-taking and the Teen Brain
LASTUPDATEDBY andyweishaar_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 88BDDE90-4FBF-11E4-90E20050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2014-11-03 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER During adolescence, your child’s body matures and she becomes more self-sufficient and independent. These years also bring dramatic hormonal fluctuations, greater peer pressure, increased access to drugs, alcohol, sex, and the risk of unsafe driving practices.
TEASERES Durante la adolescencia, tu hijo madura y se vuelve más independiente y autosuficiente.
TEASERIMAGE 5F902EF0-2439-11E7-8CD00050569A4B6C
TITLE Risk-taking and the Teen Brain
TITLEES La toma de riesgos y el cerebro de los adolescentes
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318

student thinking

Consejos para apoyar la toma de decisiones

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1O7NYjp
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1Hbtbne
BODY <p>As parents, we know there are consequences to our actions. But children develop their decision-making skills over time. Learn how to support your child’s problem solving and decision-making strategies with this video. </p>
BODYES <p>Como padres, nosotros sabemos que hay consecuencias a nuestras acciones. Pero los niños desarrollan su habilidad de tomar decisiones a través de su crecimiento. Aprenda en este video como usted puede apoyar a su hijo a desarrollar la habilidad de resolver problemas y tomar decisiones.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-10-06 17:40:51.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:31.137
DESCRIPTION Learn how to support your child’s problem solving and decision-making strategies by watching the Support Social & Emotional Development video series.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on how to support your child’s problem solving and decision-making strategies.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141597833?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141598024?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/141597833
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/141598024
FACEBOOKTEXT Learn how to support your child’s problem solving and decision-making strategies by watching the Support Social & Emotional Development video series.
FACEBOOKTEXTES Como padres, nosotros sabemos que hay consecuencias a nuestras acciones. Pero los niños desarrollan su habilidad de tomar decisiones a través de su crecimiento. Aprenda en este video como usted puede apoyar a su hijo a desarrollar la habilidad de resolver problemas y tomar decisiones.
LABEL Tips to Support Decision-Making
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID E9B0D560-6C72-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-10-06 17:40:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Tips to Support Your Child's Decision-Making
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Tips to Support Decision-Making
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Tips to Support Your Child's Decision-Making
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER As parents, we know there are consequences to our actions. But children develop their decision-making skills over time. Learn how to support your child’s problem solving and decision-making strategies by watching the Support Social & Emotional Development video series on ParentToolkit.com!
TEASERES Como padres, nosotros sabemos que hay consecuencias a nuestras acciones. Pero los niños desarrollan su habilidad de tomar decisiones a través de su crecimiento. Aprenda en este video como usted puede apoyar a su hijo a desarrollar la habilidad de resolver problemas y tomar decisiones.
TEASERIMAGE FFB7D2E0-18D4-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Tips to Support Decision-Making
TITLEES Consejos para apoyar la toma de decisiones
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Vídeo: Aprenda en este video como usted puede apoyar a su hijo a desarrollar la habilidad de resolver problemas y tomar decisiones.
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Learn how to support your child’s problem solving and decision-making strategies via @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09713-0793-7966-3CBC318C02159515
2 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D

dad and sad son

Por qué los padres deben pedir disculpas cuando pierden los estribos

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1HRXS3j
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>All parents will lose your cool at times. Why? Because you are human. You cannot handle unlimited amounts of stress, disappointment, and unmet expectations. Another reason is that our emotional brain systems, which are linked to our identity, lead us to feel badly, or inadequate, when it might appear that our children are not turning out as we would like. Rightly or wrongly, these kinds of strong feelings can lead to angry outbursts. </p> <p>But what does one do afterwards? Can hurtful words be erased? In large part, the answer is, yes.</p> <p>An effective parental apology involves a deep understanding of our child’s feelings, a great deal of self-control, and good social skills. What it does for children is immense. It reassures them about their worth and their value in the world. It lets them know that their parents care enough about them to talk to them in a serious way and admit that they made a mistake. It allows children to learn humility, a companion of empathy. Finally, it alleviates the stress of uncertainty, shame, and doubt that children feel, over having provoked or, in their eyes, deservedly caused, parental over or under-reaction.</p> <p><span class="white"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=9214C140-32E9-11E4-AB0A0050569A5318">Learn more about how you can enhance your social and emotional skills.</a></span></p> <p>Apologizing does not mean that you forget whatever your child did that was upsetting. Actually, it means that you clarify that some of what you said was hurtful and had to do with your own frustration. But there is a part of the message you want your child to get; here are some examples.</p> <p>In each case, the opening lines are something like:</p> <p>“I know used a tone of voice/yelled/said some things in a way that I should not have. I apologize for that. There was a lot going on and it got to me. So let me be clear about what I really wanted to say….”</p> <p>“When you tell me you are going to be in one place and then you go to another, that is wrong. I feel as if you don’t trust me. I know you can keep track of what you tell me and you can remember to tell me where you are. So I expect that from you.”</p> <p>“It makes me very unhappy when you hit your brother. It is not a kind thing to do. There are many times that you get along well with your brother, and I know that you can act this way much more often.”</p> <p>As you can see, the apology follows the formula, “I was wrong to say what I did, it was the result of my stress, but here is what I want to make sure you remember and here is the strength I know you can bring with you into situations that might occur in the future…” You might also want to be clear about consequences as a result of what happened, or what will happen if the problem repeats itself.</p> <p>Remember, your goal is to be more educational than punitive and to get the behavior in question to change. Another way to address these challenges between you and your child in the future is to get on the same wavelength, as you will likely have more positive results this way. The 4C’s of Emotionally Intelligent Parenting, Clarify, Coordinate, Choose, and Care, are tools that can help you make your relationship more harmonious:</p> <p><strong>Clarify.</strong> One or both parents need to make a commitment to clarify what is happening with their kids. First, each parent must be clear. What is the issue here? What are the emotional issues involved for each child? What do I really think about presents? About school work? Why do I feel this way? Is this really what I believe or am I trying to impress someone, show someone something, or make a point? What do I want my kids to learn most of all from this situation? And am I showing my confidence in them?</p> <p><strong>Coordinate.</strong> Once each parent is clear, then it is time to compare views and find common ground. Where there is common ground, kids can feel a great deal of psychological safety. This is where they can be reached, and can thrive. </p> <p><strong>Choose.</strong> Once there is some coordination, then choices must be made. “This is what we are going to do.” You need to take charge. There may be times where these choices can be informed by conversations with children, and this is especially true as they get older, but there are many times whenyou just have to decide and move on. This is a great favor to your children.  Uncertainty, lack of clarity, and parents who do not act like parents are frustrating, anxiety-provoking, and frightening for kids. The complaints that children will make about choices parents make are tiny compared to the relief they feel at finally having some clarity and some limits. And this is especially true when they feel both parents are in agreement.</p> <p><strong>Care.</strong> After the choices are made, it’s a good idea for you to show that they care about your child’s feelings. Emotionally intelligent parenting gives us a tool for this: keeping track of what happens. Are things going better as a result of the choices that have been made? Is there enough work time? Is the shopping getting done? Arrange check-in times just to see how things are going.  If necessary, the process can start over, as the new situation is clarified and new ideas are coordinated and new choices made. We show caring through our attention, concern, and follow up just as strongly as through hugs, praise, and little notes of encouragement. It is our way of saying that, as busy as we are and with all the things we are dealing with as adults, we have time and make a priority to see how our children are doing in important matters that a family has identified.</p>
BODYES <p>Todos los padres perderán los estribos en algún momento. ¿Por qué? Porque son seres humanos. Es imposible lidiar con cantidades ilimitadas de estrés, decepción y expectativas insatisfechas. Otro motivo es que los sistemas emocionales del cerebro, que están vinculados con nuestra identidad, nos hacen sentir mal o incompetentes cuando nos parece que nuestros hijos no están haciendo las cosas como querríamos. Para bien o para mal, este tipo de sentimientos pueden conducir a un estallido de ira.</p> <p>Pero ¿qué hacemos después? ¿Podemos hacer desaparecer esas palabras hirientes? En gran parte, la respuesta es sí.</p> <p>La disculpa eficaz de un padre involucra la comprensión profunda de los sentimientos de tu hijo, una gran dosis de autocontrol y buenas habilidades sociales. El resultado que tiene en los niños es muy grande. Les confirma su importancia y valor en el mundo. Les permite saber que sus padres se preocupan por ellos lo suficiente como para hablarles en forma seria y luego admitir que cometieron un error. Les permite a los niños aprender el valor de la humildad, que es compañera inseparable de la empatía. Por último, alivia la incertidumbre, la vergüenza y las dudas que puedan sentir los niños por haber provocado esa reacción en sus padres y que, según ellos entienden, fue merecida.</p> <p>Pedir disculpas no significa que olvidarás lo que haya hecho tu hijo para enojarte. En realidad, significa que aclaras los tantos sobre algo que dijiste que fue hiriente y que estaba relacionado con tu propia frustración. Y esta es la parte del mensaje que quieres que tu hijo entienda; estos son algunos ejemplos.</p> <p>En cada caso, puedes comenzar diciendo:</p> <p>“Sé que usé un tono de voz/grité/dije cosas de una forma en la que no debía, te pido disculpas por eso. Estaban pasando muchas cosas y perdí el control. Quisiera aclarar las cosas, porque en realidad quería decir que... ”</p> <p>“Cuando me dices que estarás en un lugar y después vas a otro, eso está mal. Siento que no confías en mi. Sabes que recuerdo las cosas que me dices y tú puedes recordar decirme donde estás. Eso es lo que espero de ti”.</p> <p>“Me entristece mucho ver que le pegas a tu hermano. No está bien hacer eso. En muchas ocasiones te llevas bien con él, y lo sé porque los he visto”.</p> <p>Como puedes ver, la disculpa tiene una estructura: “Me equivoqué al decir lo que dije, fue por culpa del estrés, pero esto es lo que quiero que recuerdes y esta es la fortaleza que sé que tienes para enfrentar situaciones que puedan ocurrir en el futuro...”. También sería bueno que seas especifico sobre las consecuencias como resultado de lo que ocurrió, o qué ocurrirá si el problema se repite.</p> <p>Recuerda, tu objetivo es más educativo que punitivo, y conseguir que la conducta en cuestión se modifique. Otra forma de enfrentar estos desafíos entre tú y tus hijos es tratar de estar en la misma sintonía, ya que de esta forma es más probable que tengan resultados más positivos. Estas son las cuatro herramientas principales para una crianza emocionalmente inteligente y que te ayudarán a que tus relaciones sean más armoniosas:</p> <p><strong>Aclarar.</strong> Uno o ambos padres tiene que hacer el compromiso de aclarar a sus hijos lo que ocurre. Primero, cada padre debe ser claro. ¿Cuál es el tema en cuestión? ¿Cuáles son los temas emocionales que involucran a cada hijo? ¿Qué pienso en verdad sobre los regalos? ¿Qué pasa con las tareas escolares? ¿Por qué me siento así? ¿Realmente creo en esto o estoy tratando de impresionar a alguien, de demostrar algo? ¿Qué quiero que aprendan mis hijos de esta situación? ¿Estoy mostrando que confío en ellos?</p> <p><strong>Coordinar.</strong> Una vez que los padres son claros, es momento de comparar opiniones y buscar las coincidencias. Cuando hay cosas en común, los niños sienten mayor seguridad psicológica. En este momento es cuando se puede tener mayor llegada a ellos y se pueden desarrollar las cosas.</p> <p><strong>Elegir.</strong> Una vez que se hayan coordinado los temas, entonces se pueden tomas decisiones. “Esto es lo que haremos”. Tú tienes que tomar el control. En ocasiones, estas elecciones pueden informarse a los niños en una conversación, lo cual es especialmente cierto a medida que crecen, pero muchas otras veces solo tienes que decidir y seguir adelante. Esto es un gran favor para tus hijos. La incertidumbre, la falta de claridad y padres que no se comportan como padres pueden generar frustración, asiedad y temor en los niños. Las quejas que puedan tener los niños sobre las decisiones de los padres son pequeñas en comparación con el alivio que sienten al tener las cosas claras y algunos límites. Y esto se comprueba cuando ambos padres están de acuerdo.</p> <p><strong>Cuidar.</strong> Después de las hacer las elecciones, es una buena idea demostrarle a tus hijos que te preocupas por sus sentimientos. La crianza emocionalmente inteligente nos da una herramienta para esto: registrar lo que ocurre. ¿Las cosas están mejor como resultado de las elecciones que se hicieron? ¿Hay suficiente tiempo de trabajo? ¿Se hacen las compras? Organiza los horarios para ver cómo se hacen las cosas. Si es necesario, se puede iniciar el proceso nuevamente, a medida que la nueva situación se aclara, se coordinan nuevas ideas y se toman nuevas decisiones. Demostramos nuestro cuidado y afecto mediante la atención, la preocupación y el seguimiento, de la misma manera que lo hacemos con abrazos, elogios y pequeñas notas de apoyo. Es nuestra forma de decir que, sin importar lo ocupados que estemos con todas las cosas con las que tenemos que lidiar por ser adultos, para nosotros siempre es una prioridad ver cómo les está yendo a nuestros hijos en los temas que son importantes para la familia.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:08:13.653
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:00:26.023
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Why Parents Should Apologize When They Lose Their Cool
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID E2EC9A20-70F6-11E4-98050050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2014-12-01 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER We've all been there - your child lets you down or says something that just pushes your buttons. Before you know it, you've said something you regret. How can you make it right? Dr. Maurice Elias explains.
TEASERES Todos los padres perderán los estribos en algún momento. ¿Por qué? Porque son seres humanos. Es imposible lidiar con cantidades ilimitadas de estrés, decepción y expectativas insatisfechas.
TEASERIMAGE 3471B380-1AE1-11E7-8B500050569A4B6C
TITLE Why Parents Should Apologize When They Lose Their Cool
TITLEES Por qué los padres deben pedir disculpas cuando pierden los estribos
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09713-0793-7966-3CBC318C02159515

Expertos Destacados