Looking for Social & Emotional?

Looking for Financial Literacy?

Health & Wellness

Proper nutrition, adequate sleep, and physical activity can all impact academic performance and overall mental and physical wellness. Support healthy behaviors at any age.

Looking for Something Specific?

Nutrition

Motivate your child to establish healthy eating habits by teaching them how they can select the healthier foods including fruits, vegetables, protein and more.

girl eating fruit
Nutrition
Advice

View More

plate of fruit
Nutrition
Benchmarks

View More

nutrition
Nutrition
Videos

View More


Recommended

salad making

3 Healthy and Easy Meals Young Adults Need to Know How to Make

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>As a parent, you may worry that your kid will be subsisting on late-night junk food once they’re out of your house and on their own. There may be a fair amount of snacking like that, but by making sure they have a few recipes they can make on their own, you can rest assured that they are at least capable of preparing and feeding themselves a nutritious meal. And hopefully, the next time you talk and you ask “Have you eaten anything green today?” the answer will be "Yes, and it was a vegetable, too.”</p> <h4>Grain &amp; Veggie Bowls!</h4> <p>Burrito bowls, taco bowls, Buddha bowls, goddess bowls, quinoa bowls, whatever you call it, bowls are a great option for lunch, dinner, or healthier snacking. While restaurants from fast food (Chipotle burrito bowl) to higher-end (The Ribbon in NYC) have gotten on the bowl bandwagon, these concoctions don’t require eating out to get a ton of nutrients in a convenient package at home -- or in a dorm room. The best part about bowls is you can easily swap any of the ingredients and have a completely different meal.</p> <div class="flex-video wide-screen"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/216228359?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>Start with these basic ingredients for one serving:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½  cup cooked grain</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cup vegetables</p> </li> <li> <p>½ cup protein</p> </li> <li> <p>1 tablespoon sauce</p> </li> </ul> <p>Make these swaps for a burrito bowl:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ cup brown rice</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cup mix of peppers, mushrooms, spinach, and tomatoes</p> </li> <li> <p>½ cup black beans, pinto beans, or shredded chicken</p> </li> <li> <p>1 tablespoon chipotle hot sauce or salsa</p> </li> <li> <p>To boost the flavor while keeping it healthy, add ancho chili powder a little at a time until you get a bolder taste and/or add a squeeze of lime to the rice</p> </li> </ul> <p>Make these swaps for a Mediterranean bowl:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ cup couscous</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cups mix of tomatoes, broccoli, cucumbers, and olives</p> </li> <li> <p>½ cup chickpeas</p> </li> <li> <p>1 tablespoon tahini (ground up sesame seeds) or plain yogurt mixed with lemon juice and garlic powder</p> </li> </ul> <p>Make these swaps for an Asian-inspired bowl:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ cup brown rice noodles</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cup mixed bok choy, cauliflower, and/or sweet potato</p> </li> <li> <p>¼ cup cashews or ½ cup tofu</p> </li> <li> <p>1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce with ½ teaspoon ginger mixed with juice from half a lime</p> </li> </ul> <h4>Ramen</h4> <p>Ramen has its place in many young adult’s diets simply because it’s inexpensive and easy to make. But it doesn’t have to fall into the junk food category. Some simple additions can take a cup of noodles into a full and healthy meal without adding too much time or effort. One simple way to make it healthier is to always throw away that sodium-filled flavor packet, or only use a small amount of it. Those packets can contain a lot of sodium, putting you over your daily limit easily.</p> <div class="flex-video wide-screen"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/216228713?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>Traditional ramen</p> <ul> <li> <p>Add 1 cup of vegetables to any flavor ramen, try bok choy, bean sprouts, scallions, and corn for a traditional version</p> </li> <li> <p>Add ½ cup pre-cooked pork or sausage or add a soft-boiled egg to get more protein</p> </li> </ul> <p>Egg Drop Soup</p> <ul> <li> <p>Just before your timer is up on the microwave, crack an egg into the ramen and continue cooking until the egg is cooked</p> </li> <li> <p>Add 1 cup of vegetables like scallions, spinach, and/or green beans to add a serving of vegetables</p> </li> </ul> <p>*Pair the egg drop soup with a sandwich for a more complete meal.</p> <p>Peanut Noodles</p> <ul> <li> <p>Make the ramen the way you normally would, but add a big spoonful of peanut butter and chili sauce</p> </li> <li> <p>Add pre-cooked chicken strips or edamame and 1 cup shredded carrots or cooked broccoli</p> </li> </ul> <h4>Overnight Oatmeal</h4> <p>We can’t forget about breakfast. It’s the most important meal of the day, right? It’s also the easiest one to blow off during a hectic morning. With this new take on oatmeal, making it the night before allows for a portable and no-hassle option. It can be eaten in class, at a desk, or on the commute. No excuses here!</p> <div class="flex-video wide-screen"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/216228518?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>The basic ingredients are:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ cup of low-fat milk or unsweetened almond or soy milk</p> </li> <li> <p>½ cup rolled oats</p> </li> </ul> <p>Add them together, put them in a jar, and leave them in the fridge overnight. Now, they aren’t going to be that delicious, as is. So, make them more nutritious and kick up the flavor by adding a few extra ingredients like;</p> <ul> <li> <p>¼ cup fruit (fresh, frozen, or dried)</p> </li> <li> <p>A small handful of almonds or walnuts</p> </li> <li> <p>½ teaspoon of cinnamon, brown sugar, vanilla extract, apple pie spice, or maple syrup</p> </li> </ul> <p>Vary the fruits, nuts, and add-ons and you could have a different type of oatmeal every day.</p> <p> </p>
BODYES <p>Como padre, es posible que te preocupe que tu hijo subsista cenando comida chatarra una vez que ya no viva en tu casa y esté solo. Es posible que consuma una buena cantidad de este tipo de comidas, pero al asegurarte de que tenga algunas recetas que pueda preparar solo, puedes tener la tranquilidad de que, al menos, es capaz de prepararse y comer una comida nutritiva. Y, con suerte, la próxima vez que hablen y le preguntes “¿Haz comido algo verde hoy?” la respuesta será “Sí, y se trató de una verdura, también”.</p> <h4>Boles de granos y verduras</h4> <p>Boles de burrito, boles de taco, boles Buda, boles <em>goddess</em>, boles de quinua, como sea que los llames, los boles son una excelente opción para el almuerzo, la cena o refrigerios más saludables. Si bien los restaurantes, desde los de comida rápida (bol de burrito de Chipotle) hasta los más lujosos (The Ribbon en la ciudad de Nueva York), se han sumado a la tendencia popular de los boles, no es necesario comer afuera estas mezclas para obtener una gran cantidad de nutrientes en un envase cómodo en casa, o en la habitación de una residencia de estudiantes. Lo mejor del bol es que puedes mezclar cualquier ingrediente y preparar una comida completamente diferente.</p> <div class="flex-video wide-screen"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/217888964?byline=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>Comienza con estos ingredientes básicos para una porción:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ taza de granos cocidos</p> </li> <li> <p>1 taza de verduras</p> </li> <li> <p>½ taza de proteínas</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cucharada de salsa</p> </li> </ul> <p>Haz estas variaciones para un bol de burrito:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ taza de arroz integral</p> </li> <li> <p>1 taza de mezcla de pimientos, hongos, espinaca y tomates</p> </li> <li> <p>½ taza de frijoles negros, frijoles pintos o pollo desmenuzado</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cucharada de salsa picante chipotle</p> </li> <li> <p>Para realzar el sabor y mantener la naturaleza saludable, agrega chile ancho en polvo de a poco hasta que obtengas un sabor más intenso y/o agrega un chorrito de lima al arroz</p> </li> </ul> <p>Haz estas variaciones para un bol mediterráneo:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ taza de cuscús</p> </li> <li> <p>1 taza de mezcla de tomates, brócoli, pepinos y aceitunas</p> </li> <li> <p>½ taza de garbanzos</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cucharada de tahini (pasta de semillas de sésamo) o yogur natural mezclado con jugo de limón y ajo en polvo</p> </li> </ul> <p>Haz estas variaciones para un bol inspirado en comida asiática:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ taza de fideos de arroz integral</p> </li> <li> <p>1 taza de mezcla de col china, coliflor y/o batatas</p> </li> <li> <p>¼ taza de anacardos o ½ taza de tofu</p> </li> <li> <p>1 cucharada de salsa de soja de bajo contenido de sodio con ½ cucharadita de jengibre mezclado con jugo de media lima</p> </li> </ul> <h4>Ramen</h4> <p>El ramen tiene su lugar en la alimentación de muchos adultos jóvenes simplemente porque es económico y fácil de preparar. Pero no tiene que caer en la categoría de comida chatarra. Algunas incorporaciones sencillas pueden transformar un tazón de fideos en una comida completa y saludable sin sumar demasiado tiempo ni esfuerzo. Una manera sencilla de hacer que sea más saludable es siempre deshacerte de ese paquete de sabor lleno de sodio, o solo usar una pequeña cantidad. Esos paquetes pueden contener mucho sodio, lo que hace que excedas fácilmente tu límite diario.</p> <div class="flex-video wide-screen"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/217889099?byline=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>Ramen tradicional</p> <ul> <li> <p>Agrega 1taza de verduras al ramen de cualquier sabor, prueba con col china, brotes de soja, cebolletas y maíz para una versión tradicional</p> </li> <li> <p>Agrega ½ taza de cerdo o salchicha precocidos o agrega un huevo pasado por agua para obtener más proteína</p> </li> </ul> <p>Sopa de huevo</p> <ul> <li> <p>Justo antes de que suene el temporizador del microondas, rompe un huevo en el ramen y continúa cocinando hasta que el huevo se cocine</p> </li> <li> <p>Agrega 1 taza de verduras como cebolletas, espinaca y/o ejotes para agregar una porción de verduras</p> </li> </ul> <p>*Acompaña la sopa de huevo con un sándwich para tener una comida más completa.</p> <p>Fideos con maní</p> <ul> <li> <p>Prepara el ramen como lo haces habitualmente, pero agrega una cucharada llena de mantequilla de maní y salsa de chile</p> </li> <li> <p>Agrega tiras de pollo precocido o edamame y 1 taza de zanahorias cortadas en tiras o brócoli cocido</p> </li> </ul> <h4>Avena preparada la noche anterior</h4> <p>No podemos olvidarnos del desayuno. Es la comida más importante del día, ¿verdad? Es también la más fácil de ignorar durante una mañana ajetreada. Con este nuevo acercamiento a la avena, si la preparas la noche anterior, te permite contar con una opción de vianda sencilla. Puede comerse en el aula, en un escritorio, o mientras viajas. ¡No hay excusas!</p> <div class="flex-video wide-screen"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/217888814?byline=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>Los ingredientes básicos son:</p> <ul> <li> <p>½ taza de leche desnatada o leche de almendras o soja sin endulzar</p> </li> <li> <p>½ taza de avena arrollada</p> </li> </ul> <p>Mezcla los ingredientes, ponlos en una jarra y deja la preparación en el refrigerador durante la noche. Ahora, no va a ser muy deliciosa tal como está. Entonces, hazla más nutritiva e intensifica el sabor agregando algunos ingredientes extras como:</p> <ul> <li> <p>¼ taza de fruta (fresca, congelada o seca)</p> </li> <li> <p>Un pequeño puñado de almendras o nueces</p> </li> <li> <p>½ cucharadita de canela, azúcar moreno, extracto de vainilla, especias para pastel de manzana o jarabe de arce</p> </li> </ul> <p>Varía las frutas, frutos secos e incorporaciones y podrás disfrutar de un tipo diferente de avena cada día.</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8
CMLABEL 3 Healthy and Easy Meals Young Adults Need to Know How to Make
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-13 18:01:45.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:30:23.31
DESCRIPTION From grain and veggie bowls to ramen and overnight oatmeal, these recipes will help you ensure your young adult has a few meals they can make on their own.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Teaching your children about healthy eating doesn't end after high school. Explore these easy meals to inspire your young adult to eat healthy.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Check out these easy meals to inspire all young adults to eat healthier without breaking the bank.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL 3 Healthy and Easy Meals Young Adults Need to Know How to Make
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID C6EB0870-2094-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-13 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 3 Healthy and Easy Meals for Young Adults
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 3 Easy Recipes Every College Student Needs to Know How to Make
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER From grain and veggie bowls to ramen and overnight oatmeal, these recipes will help you ensure your young adult has a few meals they can make on their own.
TEASERES Como padre, es posible que te preocupe que tu hijo subsista cenando comida chatarra una vez que ya no viva en tu casa y esté solo.
TEASERIMAGE 3379B1F0-22C3-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE 3 Healthy and Easy Meals Young Adults Need to Know How to Make
TITLEES 3 comidas fáciles y saludables que los adultos jóvenes deben saber preparar
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Explore these green & easy meals to inspire your young adult to eat healthy, via @EducationNation:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array
1 6DB53BA0-31CD-11E7-94800050569A4B6C
2 D37A0820-31D3-11E7-94800050569A4B6C
3 49B5DD60-31D5-11E7-94800050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 C05514F0-9B05-11E3-A6F30050569A5318
2 43C0451D-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

Girl Eating Strawberrys

Raising Healthy Eaters

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1fkoRHy
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>One size has never fit all when it comes to parenting techniques and this is especially true when it comes to feeding children. Too many of us have been conditioned to think that our children should be allowed to decide what they eat. You put food in front of your child and it’s up to him if he eats it. That sounds great, but he will most likely skip the healthy food and go straight for chicken nuggets and dessert. Luckily, you can help your child learn to make healthy choices on his own, with a little help from you.</p> <p><strong>Here are some tips for raising healthy eaters:</strong></p> <h4>Model good eating</h4> <p>What you choose to eat has a significant impact on the food choices your child makes, no matter what his age. Of course, parents have more influence on younger children, because older children will also want to mimic what they see their friends eating, but setting a good example from when your child is very young will help him develop healthy eating habits that his friends may even want to imitate.</p> <h4>Repeat exposure</h4> <p>Other than being born preferring the taste of sweet things and disliking bitter flavors, we are not born loving broccoli or beans. We actually learn to like a food based on the number of times we have eaten it. We now know that it takes 10 to 15 exposures to a new food to learn to like it. Since variety in a diet is essential, making sure to expose children to many different foods is great for their health.</p> <h4>Be authoritative</h4> <p>When it comes to how you feed your child, follow the advice on parenting in general. The most effective parenting techniques take into consideration both the parent’s and the child’s needs. This is called being authoritative. If you are too strict (authoritarian) or too lenient (indulgent) or even hands-off (uninvolved), you will not be as effective at parenting in general or in bringing up healthy eaters. Balance is the key.</p> <h4>Always question “I’m full”</h4> <p>Children learn from a very young age how to get out of eating something that they do not like, and they notice that if they say “I’m full,” parents tend to back off immediately. While you want to respect what your child is saying, you do need to question him when he announces that he is full after eating only a couple bites of dinner.</p> <h4>What does “I don’t like this” really mean?</h4> <p>When children say they don’t like a food it can mean any number of things, including: “I would rather have the French fries and not my broccoli.” “I just want to skip this and get to dessert.” “I would rather have chicken nuggets and not fish.” If your child says that he does not like a lot of healthy food, for instance, you could reply with, “That’s too bad. It likes you, so please eat it” Try this approach as long as it is not a food your child truly despises (see below).</p> <h4>Push in the middle</h4> <p>On a scale of 1 to 10, we all have foods we hate (#1), that really upset us or make us gag, and foods we love (#10). The trick is to never, ever push food in the 1-to-2 range, but to encourage the middle ground-foods that would rate in the 3-to-7 range.</p> <p>Eating a balanced diet was something we used to be able to do without thinking about it, when all foods were straight from nature. Today, however, we have to think about what to eat and how to pass that knowledge onto our children. Like any behavior you teach your child, it takes time and repetition, but it’s worth the reward: a healthy child who has reached his potential in all things.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=C05514F0-9B05-11E3-A6F30050569A5318">Dr Deb Kennedy</a> is an adjunct professor at the University of New Haven and the CEO of Build Healthy Kids®. Her new book The Picky Eating Solution has gained support from Dr Oz and Cat Cora. </em></p>
BODYES <p><em>Deb Kennedy, Directora ejecutiva de Build Health Kids®</em></p> <p>Cuando se trata de la crianza de los hijos, la misma técnica no sirve a todos por igual, y esto es especialmente cierto a la hora de comer. Muchos de nosotros hemos sido condicionados para creer que deberíamos permitirle a los niños decidir qué comer. Pones la comida frente a tu hijo y depende de él si la come o no. Esto suena genial, pero lo más probable es que deje de lado los alimentos saludables y vaya de lleno a los nugget de pollo y al postre. Por suerte, y con un poco de ayuda de tu parte, puedes ayudar a tu hijo a tomar sus propias elecciones saludables.</p> <p><strong>Estos son algunos consejos para criar comensales saludables:</strong></p> <h4>Moldea los buenos hábitos alimentarios</h4> <p>Lo que tú eliges para comer influye notablemente en las elecciones que hace tu hijo, no importa su edad. Ciertamente, los padres tienen mayor influencia sobre los niños cuando son más pequeños, ya que cuando son más grandes también quieren imitar a sus amigos. Dar un buen ejemplo desde que son pequeños los ayudará a desarrollar hábitos alimenticios saludables que incluso sus amigos podrían querer imitar.</p> <h4>Repite la exposición</h4> <p>Además de nacer con una preferencia natural por los sabores dulces y con aversión hacia los sabores amargos, no nacemos amando el brócoli o los frijoles. De hecho, un alimento nos gustará más o menos según la cantidad de veces que lo hayamos comido. Y también sabemos que debemos ser expuestos entre 10 a 15 veces a un nuevo alimento para que nos guste. Como la variedad en la dieta es fundamental, asegúrate de exponer a tus hijos a diferentes alimentos. También será beneficioso para su salud.</p> <h4>Ten autoridad</h4> <p>Cuando se trata de la alimentación de tus hijos, sigue los consejos generales sobre paternidad. Las técnicas de crianza más eficaces toman en cuenta las necesidades de los padres y del niño. A esto se lo llama tener autoridad. Si eres muy estricto (autoritario) o muy tolerante (indulgente), o incluso no intervienes (desentendido), no serás tan eficiente en tu crianza en términos generales o en criar comensales saludables. El equilibrio es la clave.</p> <h4>Siempre duda del “Estoy lleno”</h4> <p>Los niños aprenden desde muy pequeños cómo librarse de comer algo que no les gusta, y se dan cuenta de que si dicen “estoy lleno”, los padres dejan de molestarlos al instante. Si bien debes respetar lo que dice tu hijo, también debes preguntarle qué ocurre cuando dice que ya está satisfecho después de haber comido solo unos pocos bocados.</p> <h4>¿Qué significa en realidad “esto no me gusta”?</h4> <p>Cuando los niños dicen que no les gusta un alimento puede significar varias cosas, entre las que se incluyen: “Prefiero comer papas fritas, no brócoli”. “Quiero saltearme este plato y comer el postre”. “Prefiero comer nuggets de pollo, no pescado”. Si tu hijo dice que muchos alimentos saludables no le gustan, puedes decirle “¡Qué lastima!,  porque a él sí le gustas, así que por favor, come”. Prueba con esta técnica siempre y cuando no sea un alimento que tu hijo deteste realmente (ver a continuación).</p> <h4>Encuentra el término medio</h4> <p>En una escala del 1 al 10, todos tenemos alimentos que odiamos (el puesto n.º 1), que realmente nos disgustan o nos dan arcadas, y alimentos que amamos (el puesto n.º 10).  El truco es nunca obligarlos a comer los alimentos que ubican en los primeros 2 puestos, si no más bien alentar la ingesta de los alimentos que ocupan del 3.º al 7.º lugar.</p> <p>Cuando todos los alimentos provenían directamente de la naturaleza, llevar una dieta equilibrada era algo habitual y ni siquiera prestábamos atención a eso. Hoy en día, tenemos que pensar en qué comemos y cómo transmitimos ese conocimiento a nuestros hijos. Al igual que cualquier conducta que enseñas a tus hijos, lleva tiempo y repetición, pero vale la pena el esfuerzo: un niño saludable que ha alcanzado su potencial en todas las áreas.</p> <p><em>La Dra. Deb Kennedy es profesora adjunta en la University of New Haven y Directora ejecutiva de Build Health Kids®. Su nuevo libro, “The Picky Eating Solution” cuenta con el respaldo del Dr. Oz y de Cat Cora.</em></p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:05:27.76
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:53:23.477
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Raising Healthy Eaters
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID DDF598E0-A87F-11E3-B0B40050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-03-10 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES Cuando se trata de la crianza de los hijos, la misma técnica no sirve a todos por igual, y esto es especialmente cierto a la hora de comer.
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER One size has never fit all when it comes to parenting techniques and this is especially true when it comes to feeding children. Too many of us have been conditioned to think that our children should be allowed to decide what they eat.
TEASERES Cuando se trata de la crianza de los hijos, la misma técnica no sirve a todos por igual, y esto es especialmente cierto a la hora de comer.
TEASERIMAGE EA409CB0-208D-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
TITLE Raising Healthy Eaters
TITLEES Cómo criar comensales saludables
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 C05514F0-9B05-11E3-A6F30050569A5318

Grocery Store Aisle

7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1icUKlm
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Getting kids to make healthy food choices can be a challenge, and some of the foods marketed to kids and parents as “healthy” actually aren’t. We asked American Heart Association spokeswoman <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=3E44A7D0-9B07-11E3-A6F30050569A5318">Dr. Rachel Johnson</a> to help us tell the good from the bad. Here are 7 examples of supposedly healthy foods to pay attention to before serving to your child.</p> <h4>Yogurt</h4> <p>Yogurt is a great source of calcium, protein, and potassium and is often fortified with vitamin D. But kids’ yogurts are often flavored, full of added sugars, and high in fat. Some kids’ yogurt even comes with cookie or candy toppings. These are not healthy choices. Instead, try low or nonfat plain yogurt that you can sweeten yourself at home with cut-up fruit or a small amount of honey. If your child is picky, try mixing nonfat plain yogurt with the flavored yogurt she’s used to.</p> <h4>Granola</h4> <p>Granola often sounds like a healthy choice, but it can be high in fat, sugar, and calories. Granola that is marketed as lower fat often has additional sugar to make it taste better. Look closely at the labels and particularly at serving sizes. Many granolas offer only ¼ cup per serving, which is often less than we might serve. Instead, think of granola as a topping for yogurt or fruit, and don’t rely on it as a cereal.</p> <h4>Energy Bars</h4> <p>Energy Bars can be really high in calories and sugar. These bars, high in protein and fiber, are  intended as a substitute for meals, rather than a snack. Dr. Johnson says if your child is eating them as a snack, she might as well eat a candy bar.</p> <h4>Smoothies</h4> <p>Smoothies are another tricky item. When made at home, where you can control the portion size and ingredients, they can be a good option for a quick breakfast. But pre-packaged or restaurant smoothies can have a lot of added sugars and extra calories. Some smoothies can have as many calories as a milkshake. When ordering a smoothie, make sure it is made with nonfat yogurt, no added sugars, and whole fruits rather than juice.</p> <h4>Salad Bars</h4> <p>Salad bars are incredibly popular right now at restaurants and in some school cafeterias, but it’s important for your child to choose healthy options from the assortment of ingredients. If your child’s salad has a lot of cheese, croutons, and bacon bits, and is topped with a full-fat ranch dressing, that’s not a very healthy option. Instead, focus on incorporating more vegetables, like shredded carrots, beans, and tomatoes and using a low-fat dressing.</p> <h4>100% Fruit Gummies</h4> <p>While 100% fruit gummies may seem like a fun way for your child to eat fruit, most gummies are made from concentrated fruit juice. Which is basically the same as cane sugar. Gummies offer no nutritional value like phytonutrients or fiber, both of which are found in whole fruits. Instead, offer your child whole fruits.</p> <h4>Multigrain Crackers</h4> <p>Just because a product says “multigrain” does not mean it is healthy. Multigrain only means there is more than one grain in the product. Try to focus more on whole grains, and make sure to check the labels. A whole-grain cracker is a better choice than a multigrain cracker made with no whole grains. </p>
BODYES <p>Hacer que los niños coman de manera saludable puede ser un gran desafío, y algunos de los alimentos publicitados como “saludables” para los niños en realidad no lo son. Le pedimos a la Dra. Rachel Johnson, vocera de la American Heart Association, que nos ayude a identificar los alimentos saludables y los no saludables. Estos son 7 ejemplos de alimentos aparentemente saludables y a los que debes prestar atención antes de servírselos a tus hijos.</p> <h4>Yogur</h4> <p>El yogur es una excelente fuente de calcio, proteínas y potasio, y muchas veces está fortificado con vitamina D. Pero los yogures para niños suelen ser saborizados, tienen azúcar añadida y un alto contenido de grasas. Algunos yogures para niños incluyen galletas o golosinas y estas no son opciones saludables. En lugar de esto, prueba el yogur natural con bajo contenido en grasas o descremado; puedes endulzarlo tú mismo con trozos de frutas frescas o un poquito de miel. Si tu hijo es quisquilloso, prueba de mezclar el yogur natural descremado con el yogur saborizado que suele comer.</p> <h4>Granola</h4> <p>La granola siempre parece ser una opción saludable, pero suele tener grandes cantidades de grasas, azúcar y calorías. La granola que se comercializa como reducida en grasas tiene azúcar añadida para darle mejor sabor. Presta mucha atención a las etiquetas, en especial a los tamaños de las porciones. Muchas granolas ofrecen solo ¼ de taza por porción, que es mucho menos de la cantidad que serviríamos. Usa la granola para espolvorear el yogurt o frutas y no la consumas como reemplazo de los cereales.</p> <h4>Barritas energéticas</h4> <p>Las barritas energéticas tienen un alto contenido de calorías y azúcar. Estas barritas, ricas en proteínas y fibras, están pensadas para consumir como reemplazo de una comida y no como un bocadillo. La Dra. Johnson aclara que si tu hijo las come como bocadillos, bien podría comer una barra de dulce.</p> <h4>Batidos de frutas</h4> <p>Los batidos de frutas son otro alimento engañoso. Cuando los preparamos en casa podemos controlar el tamaño de la porción y los ingredientes, y pueden ser una buena opción para un desayuno rápido. Pero los batidos envasados o de restaurante puede tener grandes cantidades de azúcar añadida y calorías extra. Algunos batidos pueden tener las mismas calorías que una malteada. Cuando pidas un batido de frutas, asegúrate de que lo preparan con yogur descremado, sin azúcar añadida y con frutas frescas en lugar de jugo.</p> <h4>Barras de ensaladas</h4> <p>Las barras de ensaladas son muy populares actualmente en los restaurantes y en algunos comedores escolares, pero es importante que tu hijo elija opciones saludables entre la variedad de ingredientes disponibles. Si la ensalada tiene mucha cantidad de queso, crutones y trocitos de tocino, y la condimenta con aderezo Ranch regular, no es una opción muy saludable. Concéntrate en destacar la importancia de incorporar más vegetales, como zanahoria rallada, frijoles y tomate y condimentar con un aderezo reducido en grasas.</p> <h4>Gominolas 100% fruta</h4> <p>Si bien las gominolas 100% fruta pueden parecer una forma divertida de hacer que tu hijo coma frutas, la mayoría están elaboradas con jugo concentrado de frutas que, básicamente, es lo mismo que el azúcar de caña. Las gominolas no aportan valores nutricionales como los fitonutrientes o la fibra, que sí están presentes en las frutas frescas. En vez de esto, ofrécele frutas frescas a tu hijo.</p> <h4>Galletas multicereal</h4> <p>Solo porque un producto dice que es “multicereal” no significa que es saludable. Multicereal solo quiere decir que hay más de un tipo de cereal en el producto. Trata de buscar productos con cereales integrales y revisa las etiquetas. Una galleta con cereales integrales es una mejor opción que una galleta multicereal sin cereales integrales.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
CMLABEL 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:05:28.837
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:27:52.41
DESCRIPTION It’s important for your child to choose healthy options from the assortment of ingredients.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit about kids' foods that aren't as healthy as you would think.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Some foods aren't as healthy as you think. Find out what they are:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 714736F0-ADE7-11E3-AF530050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-03-17 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER <p class="Normal1">Getting kids to make healthy food choices can be a challenge, and some of the foods marketed to kids and parents as “healthy” actually aren’t. We asked American Heart Association spokeswoman Dr. Rachel Johnson to help us tell the good from the bad. Here are 7 examples of supposedly healthy foods to pay attention to before serving to your child. </p>
SHORTTEASERES Hacer que los niños coman de manera saludable puede ser un gran desafío, y algunos de los alimentos publicitados como “saludables” para los niños en realidad no lo son.
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Salad bars are incredibly popular right now at restaurants and in some school cafeterias, but it’s important for your child to choose healthy options from the assortment of ingredients.
TEASERES Hacer que los niños coman de manera saludable puede ser un gran desafío, y algunos de los alimentos publicitados como “saludables” para los niños en realidad no lo son.
TEASERIMAGE 4E104990-208C-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
TITLE 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
TITLEES 7 alimentos "saludables" para niños, que en realidad no lo son
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Some foods aren't as healthy as you think. Find out what they are via @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

mom daughter hug

Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1yktQPD
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>It seems everywhere you look there’s a message about bodies. Whether it’s song lyrics talking about “big booty” or the models in fashion magazines, messages and images about the definition of beauty are all around us. And it’s not just adults who are hearing it. Every day your child, daughter or son, is exposed to similar messages. We all want our children to grow up with a healthy view of themselves, both in appearance and self-worth. But how can you, as a parent, compete with all the messages your child hears outside home? We talked to some of our Parent Toolkit experts to get their advice on how you can be a positive influence on your child’s body image, whether your child is male or female, underweight, overweight or average.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Learn more about ways you can nurture your child's social and emotional well-being</a>.</p> <p>You can begin to combat the external messages by talking about body image from an early age. Kansas City-based pediatrician Dr. Natasha Burgert recommends you start by asking them “What is pretty?” and “What is handsome?” Then, you can give them your definitions for the words.</p> <blockquote>“Based on what they say, you have lots of discussions and opportunities to reframe positive body image,” says Dr. Burgert. “If they describe a real person you can say ‘yes, Daddy is handsome, but isn’t he also kind? He takes care of our family, that’s what makes him handsome to me.’”</blockquote> <p>If your child describes a fictional character, point out qualities like bravery or courage that the character shows rather than just external qualities. With small conversations like these started at an early age, you can help frame how your child views beauty.</p> <p>Overwhelmingly, our experts agree that the number one thing you can do to instill a positive body image for your child is to pay close attention to what you are saying. Yes, you. As parents and caregivers, your child takes cues from you from the time they’re young children to the time they’re entering adulthood, even if at that point they don’t admit it.</p> <p>“I think we confuse attention with influence. Even though a middle schooler doesn’t give you attention, it doesn’t mean you don’t have influence,” says Dr. Burgert. “If mom is looking in the mirror and saying ‘I’m too fat,’ the kids will do that too.”</p> <p>According to the Centers for Disease Control survey of high school students, 19 percent of girls said they didn’t eat for 24 hours or more in order to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight. For boys, that number is 7 percent.</p> <p>Parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba recommends keeping an eye on your child’s online behaviors, from what photo she decides to post on social media to the websites she’s visiting.</p> <blockquote>“We often overlook their Instagram or Facebook account,” Dr. Borba says. “I don’t think parents are aware of what they’re looking at.”</blockquote> <p>Some adolescents visit pro-ana (pro-anorexia) or pro-mia (pro-bulimia) websites to find tips and support to drive disordered eating. As research for this article, our team did a search on Instagram with the hash tag #ana, #mia and #thinspo (for thin inspiration). The results were telling. Page after page revealed images of extremely thin women and girls. Some were images of models, while others were selfies. One even asked for “likes” on the page, and said for each “like” she received, she wouldn’t eat for 4 hours.</p> <p>So what should you say if you notice your child may be losing weight or seems to have a different approach at the dinner table than before? School counselor Dr. Shari Sevier recommends coming from a place of concern and pointing out what you’ve noticed as a way to get the conversation going. Start with “I’ve noticed that you’ve…”</p> <blockquote>“Tell them about your concern, and then go to the doctor,” says Dr. Sevier. “With eating disorders you need a multiple team approach and need professionals.”</blockquote> <p>“Having an unhealthy body image is irregardless of weight,” Dr. Burgert points out. “It’s more conceptual and more broad about a healthy body image and self-esteem.”</p> <p>And Dr. Burgert has a point. While research shows as many as 10 in 100 young women in the United States have an eating disorder, more than one in three children and adolescents were overweight or obese in 2012. Children who are overweight from a young age have a higher risk for developing chronic diseases like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It can be a hard conversation to start, as becoming obese doesn’t happen overnight. Pounds get put on over the course of weeks, months, and even years, but the best approach is to not single out an overweight child.</p> <blockquote>“My most successful families are the ones who took this on as a family issue,” says Dr. Burgert. “We’re not making you run on the treadmill while we all sit on the couch and eat Cheetos. We’re all going to eat healthy and go on walks together. It’s not a negotiation, it’s a whole family change.”</blockquote> <p>In order to get the whole family involved, Dr. Borba recommends getting your kids involved in food preparation, grocery shopping, and cooking. You can even use a “green, yellow, red” way to categorize foods for your family. Green means “go” - these include vegetables and fruits essentially foods that are O.K. to eat all the time. Yellow are the “slow down” foods, or foods that can be eaten sometimes but not all the time, like refined grains. Red foods should be eaten very infrequently, like a piece of cake once a week.</p> <blockquote>“Go ahead and print out recipes that would fall into the green or yellow category and make your own cookbook,” Dr. Borba says. Choose those recipes with your children and have them help you shop and prepare the meal so they are invested as well.</blockquote> <p>It’s not always an easy thing to do, but your influence on your child can be the key to a healthy body image.</p> <p>“So many of us as adults have so many emotions about our own body image and it’s hard not to translate that on,” says Dr. Burgert. “Talk about how proud you are of your accomplishments, like ‘I read really well’ or ‘I helped that person,’ rather than ‘I look great.’ You need to start with you.”</p> <p><em>This is the third post in our week-long series — Tough Talks— where we’ve surveyed a handful of our Parent Toolkit experts to see what they recommend for parents to make tough conversations go more smoothly. Tomorrow we’ll tackle the topic of mental health.</em></p> <p><em>If you or someone you know needs help or would like more information about the issue, please call the National Eating Disorders Hotline at 1-800-931-2237 or visit </em><a href="http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/"><em>http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/</em></a><em>.</em></p>
BODYES <p>En todas partes vemos mensajes directamente relacionados con el cuerpo. Ya sea en la letra de una canción que habla sobre “traseros grandes”, o con las modelos en las revistas de moda, estamos rodeados de mensajes e imágenes que “definen” lo que es la belleza. Y no solo los adultos somos bombardeados con estos mensajes, nuestros hijos e hijas también están expuestos a esto a diario. Todos queremos que nuestros hijos crezcan con una imagen positiva de sí mismos, tanto en apariencia como en autoestima. Pero como padres, ¿cómo podemos luchar contra todos estos mensajes que atacan a nuestros hijos cuando no están en casa? Consultamos con nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones sobre cómo podemos influir de manera positiva en la imagen corporal de nuestros hijos, ya sean varones, mujeres, con bajo peso, con sobrepeso o con peso promedio.</p> <p>Conoce más formas en las que puedes contribuir al bienestar social y emocional de tus hijos.</p> <p>Para iniciar el combate contra esta invasión de mensajes, debes hablar con tus hijos sobre la imagen corporal desde muy temprana edad. La Dra. Natasha Burgert, pediatra de Kansas City, nos recomienda hacerles estas preguntas: “¿qué significa ser linda?” o “¿qué significa ser guapo?”, y luego tú les explicas lo que significan para ti.</p> <blockquote>“Basándote en sus respuestas podrás charlar con ellos sobre el tema y generarás el espacio para reencuadrar su imagen corporal”, nos cuenta la Dra. Burgert. “Si describen a una persona real puedes decirles “Sí, papá es guapo, pero también es amable, ¿verdad? Cuida de nuestra familia y, para mí, eso también significa ser una persona guapa”.</blockquote> <p>Si tu hijo describe a un personaje de ficción, señala características como el coraje o la valentía, en lugar de solo prestar atención a sus características físicas. Si desde temprana edad tienes este tipo de charlas con tus hijos, podrás ayudar a formar el concepto que tengan de belleza.</p> <p>Nuestros expertos acuerdan, en forma unánime, que lo mejor que puedes hacer para que tu hijo tenga una imagen corporal positiva es prestar mucha atención a lo que dices. Sí, a lo que tú dices. Los hijos forman sus opiniones teniendo en cuenta lo que dicen sus padres y cuidadores, desde que son pequeños hasta que son adultos, aun cuando en esa etapa de la vida no lo admitan.</p> <p>“Creo que confundimos el prestar atención con la influencia. Que un alumno de escuela intermedia no te preste atención no significa que no tengas influencia sobre él”, dice la Dra. Burgert. “Si la mamá se mira al espejo y dice ‘Estoy muy gorda’, los hijos también lo harán”.</p> <p>Según una encuesta entre estudiantes de escuela secundaria realizada por los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades, el 19% de las mujeres respondieron que habían pasado 24 horas o más sin comer para bajar de peso o para evitar engordar. Entre los varones, la cifra fue del 7%.</p> <p>La Dra. Michele Borba, experta en crianza, recomienda estar atentos a la conducta en línea de tu hija, desde la foto que elige publicar en su perfil de redes sociales hasta los sitios web que visita.</p> <blockquote>“Muchas veces no damos importancia a sus cuentas de Facebook o Instagram”, explica la Dra. Borba. “Creo que los padres no saben muy bien qué es lo que están mirando”.</blockquote> <p>Algunos adolescentes visitan sitios web Pro-Ana (a favor de la anorexia) o Pro-Mia (a favor de la bulimia) para buscar consejos y ayuda para seguir un estilo de vida que promueve estos trastornos alimenticios. En el curso de la investigación para este artículo, nuestro equipo hizo una búsqueda en Instagram con las etiquetas #ana, #mia y #thinspo (inspiración para ser delgado), y los resultados fueron reveladores. Páginas y páginas con imágenes de mujeres y adolescentes extremadamente delgadas. Algunas eran fotos de modelos y otras eran selfies. Incluso había una muchacha que pedía que le dieran “me gusta” a su foto, y por cada uno que recibiera no iba a comer nada durante 4 horas.</p> <p>Entonces, ¿qué deberías hacer si notas que tu hijo baja de peso o a la hora de la cena se comporta de manera distinta a la que era habitual? La consejera escolar, Dra. Shari Sevier, recomienda abordar el tema desde la preocupación, mencionando lo que has notado. Puedes iniciar la conversación diciendo “He notado que...”</p> <blockquote>“Cuéntale qué es lo que te preocupa, y luego visiten al médico”, aconseja la Dra. Sevier. “En el caso de los trastornos alimenticios se necesita el trabajo multidisciplinario de un equipo de profesionales”...Una imagen corporal poco saludable no está relacionada únicamente con el peso”, señala la Dra. Burgert. “El tema es más amplio y conceptual, incluye una imagen corporal saludable y la autoestima”.</blockquote> <p>Y aquí es donde la Dra. Burgert da en la tecla. Si bien las investigaciones demuestran que, en los Estados Unidos, 10 de cada 100 mujeres jóvenes padecen de trastornos alimenticios, en 2012 más de uno cada tres niños y adolescentes tenían sobrepeso o eran obesos. Los niños con sobrepeso desde temprana edad corren mayor riesgo de desarrollar enfermedades crónicas, como la diabetes tipo 2 o enfermedades cardíacas. Es un tema difícil de tratar, pero la obesidad no ocurre de la noche a la mañana. Los kilos se acumulan con el paso de las semanas, los meses e, incluso, los años. Pero el mejor enfoque es no señalar o dar un trato especial a un niño obeso.</p> <blockquote>“Las familias más exitosas son aquellas que tratan este tema como un problema familiar”, dice la Dra. Burgert. “No te vamos a obligar a usar la cinta para correr mientras nosotros nos sentamos en el sofá y comemos Cheetos. Todos vamos a comer de manera más saludable y saldremos a hacer ejercicio juntos. No es una negociación, es un cambio para toda la familia”.</blockquote> <p>Para que toda la familia se involucre, la Dra. Borba recomienda que los niños participen en la preparación de los alimentos, en las compras y en la cocina. También puedes usar un sistema de clasificación de los alimentos por colores: verde, amarillo y rojo. El verde significa “vía libre”, que incluye las frutas y las verduras. Básicamente, los alimentos que se pueden comer en cualquier momento. El amarillo son los alimentos para “tomar con calma”, aquellos alimentos que podemos comer a veces pero no siempre, como por ejemplo las harinas refinadas. Los alimentos rojos son aquellos que solo están permitidos en ocasiones especiales, como por ejemplo una porción de pastel una vez por semana.</p> <blockquote>“Busca e imprime recetas que puedas clasificar como verdes o amarillas y arma tu propio libro de cocina”, aconseja la Dra. Borba. Elije las recetas con tus hijos y permíteles ayudarte a hacer las compras y preparar la comida, para que ellos también se involucren.</blockquote> <p>No siempre es fácil, pero tu influencia en tus hijos puede ser fundamental para una imagen corporal saludable.</p> <p>“Como adultos, muchos de nosotros tenemos sentimientos tan profundos sobre nuestra propia imagen corporal que es imposible no trasladarlos a otros”, dice la Dra. Burgert. “Cuando estés frente al espejo, en vez de decirte ‘Me veo genial’, intenta elogiar tus logros: ‘puedo leer muy bien’ o ‘logré ayudar a alguien’. Tienes que comenzar contigo”.</p> <p><em>Esta es la tercera publicación de nuestra serie semanal, Charlas difíciles, donde consultamos a nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones para que los padres puedan hablar en forma más cómoda sobre estos temas espinosos. Mañana trataremos el tema de la salud mental.</em></p> <p><em>Si tú o alguien que conoces necesita ayuda, o deseas obtener más información sobre el tema, comunícate con la línea nacional de ayuda para trastornos de la alimentación al 1-800-931-2237 o visita <a href="http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/.">http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/.</a></em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B7A1F1E-5056-9A4B-6C21F1E302C85D08,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5
CMLABEL Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED [empty string]
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:43:58.78
DESCRIPTION Every day children are exposed to messages about how they are supposed to look. Here's advice on how to talk to them about it.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about having a positive influence on your child's body image:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Every day children are exposed to messages about how they are supposed to look. Here's advice on how to talk to them about it.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID D5B127A0-5610-11E4-ADC90050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7A1F1E-5056-9A4B-6C21F1E302C85D08
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-10-22 10:30:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Positively Influence Your Child’s Body Image
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES Cómo influir de manera positiva en la imagen corporal de tu hijo
SOCIALTITLE How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER It seems everywhere you look there’s a message about bodies. We talked to some of our Parent Toolkit experts to get their advice on how you can be a positive influence on your child’s body image, whether your child is male or female, underweight, overweight or average.
TEASERES En todas partes vemos mensajes directamente relacionados con el cuerpo.
TEASERIMAGE 59726710-1D48-11E7-A4000050569A4B6C
TITLE Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
TITLEES Charlas difíciles: cómo influir de manera positiva en la imagen corporal de tu hijo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Every day children are exposed to messages about how they are supposed to look. Here's how to talk to them about it.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Physical Health

This section has things like benchmarks and videos that will help you track your child’s development and encourage healthy physical activity.

boy swimming
Physical Health
Advice

View More

girl yoga
Physical Health
Benchmarks

View More

jump rope young boy
Physical Health
News

View More


Recommended

Sad Girl Reading

Debunking the Belief That Sitting Equals Learning

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2eAbXsx
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>With another school year beginning, children all over the country are entering classrooms where they’ll be expected to sit for long minutes and hours at a stretch and absorb information through their eyes, their ears, and the seat of their pants. But is that really the best way for your child to learn? Is it even fair to ask young kids, who by nature’s design are the most energetic among us, to <em>stay still</em> for what must seem like an eternity?</p> <p>Whether we’re talking about preschool, elementary through secondary school, college, or even adult learners, schools – and policymakers – have for too long accepted the belief that learning best occurs while students are seated (and quiet, of course). The theory may have been understandable back when they didn’t have the research to prove otherwise. But <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/30/living/no-sitting-still-movement-schools/" target="_blank">today we do</a> and it’s important that you know about it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=269FB610-3A29-11E6-AEE40050569A5318" target="_blank"><strong>RELATED: Debunking the Belief That Earlier is Better</strong></a></p> <p>Today we have research showing that the <a href="http://www.howtolearn.com/2012/12/learning-is-multi-sensory-how-to-engage-all-the-senses-so-children-really-benefit/" target="_blank">more senses used</a> in the learning process the higher the percentage of retention. That means that if your child has the chance to experience a concept by seeing it, hearing it, and perhaps also touching it, that concept will have much greater relevance to your child and will stay with her much longer than if she’s simply reading or being told about it. As an example, brain-based learning expert Eric Jensen asks, if you hadn’t ridden a bike in five years, would you still be able to do it? And, if you hadn’t heard the name of capital of Peru for five years, would you still remember what it was? The answer to the bike challenge is probably yes, but the answer to the Peru capital question (Lima) is <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=0FH4vlwis4YC&amp;pg=PA74&amp;lpg=PA74&amp;dq=eric+jensen,+capital+of+peru&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=6dTituHfcA&amp;sig=5TDDO3u4nlLgn83nd2bKs01Rzjg&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjro7Tf9o7PAhUG1x4KHWG3BAsQ6AEIHjAA#v=onepage&amp;q=eric%20jensen%2C%20capital%20of%20peru&amp;f=false" target="_blank">probably no</a>. Yet, despite the wisdom in this, many schools still insist on pumping data through the eyes or ears only and expect students to retain it anyway.</p> <p>Additionally, we have research showing that the <a href="http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-do-you-think-better-after-walk-exercise/" target="_blank">brain is far more active during physical activity</a> than while one is seated. Eric Jensen has told me, “The brain is constantly responding to environmental input. Compared to a baseline of sitting in a chair, walking, moving and active learning bumps up blood flow and key chemicals for focus and long-term memory (norepinephrine) as well as for effort and mood (dopamine).” Yet schools and policymakers cling to the belief that the body has nothing to do with how the brain functions.</p> <p>Finally – and this is the big one, from my perspective – we have research demonstrating that <a href="http://www.pgsd.org/cms/lib07/PA01916597/Centricity/Domain/43/braininmind.pdf" target="_blank">sitting in a chair <em>increases fatigue</em> and <em>reduces concentration</em></a> (our bodies are designed to move, not sit). Yet policymakers and schools implement policies (more testing; no recess; even <a href="http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/education/2007-06-03-children-bathroom-breaks_N.htm" target="_blank">fewer bathroom breaks</a>) that require students to do more sitting. What sense can that possibly make?</p> <p>Think back to a day when you were forced to sit for endless minutes and hours at a conference, in a meeting, or perhaps on a plane. Did you find yourself exhausted at the end of that day? Were you perplexed as to the reason, since all you did was sit? Well, given the research, exhaustion is a completely understandable outcome.</p> <p>In a <a href="http://www.bamradionetwork.com/educators-channel/326-teaching-strategieshandling-young-students-who-just-wont-sit-still" target="_blank">BAM Radio segment</a> on the subject of sitting in the classroom, pediatric occupational therapist Christy Isbell proclaimed:</p> <p>“Who’s to say we have to sit down to learn? Why can’t we stand to learn? Why can’t we lay on the floor on our tummies to learn? Why can’t we sit in the rocking chair to learn? There are lots of other simple movement strategies. Just changing the position can make a big difference.”</p> <p>Indeed!</p> <p>Fortunately there are teachers – and even some schools – that allow students to sit on exercise balls or to work at tables or standing desks, or to get up and move around when they feel the need. And the results have been more than encouraging.</p> <p>In <a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2012-08-07/health/chi-standing-desks-the-classroom-of-the-future-20120807_1_desks-standings-classroom" target="_blank">one study</a>, researchers equipped four first-grade classrooms in Texas with standing desks. What they found was that, even though the desks were equipped with stools of the appropriate height for sitting, 70 percent of the students never used their stools, and the other 30 percent stood the majority of the time. Moreover, the researchers discovered that standing increased attention, alertness, engagement, and on-task behavior among the students – a dream come true for any teacher!</p> <p><img src="/images/dmImage/SourceImage/brainsitting.jpg" border="0" width="100%" /></p> <blockquote> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">This speaks for itself! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ECECHAT?src=hash">#ECECHAT</a> <a href="https://t.co/y9PRte0CdG">pic.twitter.com/y9PRte0CdG</a></p> — Rae Pica (@raepica1) <a href="https://twitter.com/raepica1/status/783486417548763136">October 5, 2016</a></blockquote> <script></script> <p> </p> <p>Not long ago I tweeted the image of <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=chuck+hillman+brain+scan&amp;espv=2&amp;biw=1280&amp;bih=899&amp;site=webhp&amp;tbm=isch&amp;tbo=u&amp;source=univ&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwi6iveXl9jOAhXkCcAKHT37CJMQsAQILQ#imgrc=-H1KUdzC2OK3DM%3A" target="_blank">two brain scans</a> published by the University of Illinois’ Dr. Chuck Hillman. One scan showed the brain after sitting quietly and the other following a 20-minute walk. The difference was remarkable, with the latter <em>far</em> more “lit up” than the former. The tweet took off. I absolutely adored the response of one teacher, Dee Kalman, who said the images offered scientific proof for her teaching mantra: “When the bum is numb, the mind is dumb.”</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=F8E7E760-798F-11E5-B4220050569A5318" target="_blank">NEWS: Standing Desks Come to School Classrooms</a></strong></p> <p>I couldn’t have said it better myself.</p> <p><strong><em>So, what’s a parent to do? My advice:</em></strong></p> <p>- Given what you now know, try not to worry or feel bad if a teacher mentions your child’s inability to sit still. It is unnatural and unhealthy for children to sit for lengthy periods – and it certainly isn’t conducive to learning. (Personally, I’d be more worried about a child – typically a girl – whose desire to please causes a high level of compliance and an abnormal level of stillness.)<br />- If your child is struggling as a result of being forced to sit still, gather as much research as possible before talking with the teacher about alternate possibilities (for example, brain breaks, students being allowed to stand or move as needed, sitting on a bouncy ball). Remember that the research applies to the vast majority of children so you’re not asking for special consideration for your child only.<br />- Take inspiration from the <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/10/health/standing-desks-impact-health-education/" target="_blank">Starretts</a>, who raised money to bring standing desks to their daughter’s fourth-grade classroom – and later to the whole elementary school.<br />- If your child’s is one of the 40% of U.S. elementary schools that have eliminated recess, fight to have it returned! Children’s brains and bodies require frequent breaks (more on this in a future post). You can learn more about becoming a recess advocate at the website of the American Association for the Child’s Right to Play (<a href="http://www.ipausa.org/" target="_blank">www.ipausa.org</a>).<br />- Counterbalance time spent sitting in school with time spent moving at home! Limit screen time – television <em>and</em> digital devices – and encourage your child to go out to play. Children encouraged to play outside and get active are more likely to do so. If they need additional encouragement, go outside and play with them!</p> <p><em>Rae Pica has brought her messages about the development and education of the whole child to parents and educators throughout North America. Her latest book is</em><em> </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1483381846/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1483381846&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=movinlearn-20&amp;linkId=VJYREHYHMHUFALUM" target="_blank">What If Everybody Understood Child Development?: Straight Talk About Bettering Education and Children’s Lives</a><em>. You can learn more about her at</em><em> </em><a href="http://www.raepica.com/" target="_blank"><em>www.raepica.com</em></a><em> </em><em>and follow her at </em><a href="https://twitter.com/raepica1" target="_blank"><em>@raepica1</em></a><em>.</em></p>
BODYES <p><em>Rae Pica, consultora en educación</em></p> <p>Comienza otro año escolar y los niños de todo el país llegan a la escuela, donde deberán permanecer sentados por minutos y horas, y absorber información a través de sus ojos, sus oídos y sus asientos. Pero ¿esa es la mejor forma que tiene tu hijo de aprender? ¿Es justo pedirles a los niños, que por naturaleza son los que más energía tienen, permanecer sentados por un tiempo que parece ser una eternidad?</p> <p>Ya sea que hablemos del preescolar, primaria o secundaria, universidad, o hasta estudiantes adultos, escuelas y legisladores, parece que comparten la idea de que la mejor forma de aprender es cuando los estudiantes están sentados (y en silencio, por supuesto). Esta teoría pudo resultar comprensible cuando no existía una investigación que demostrara lo contrario. Pero en la actualidad, sí tenemos pruebas de lo contrario y es importante que las conozcas.</p> <p>Hoy en día, contamos con estudios que demuestran que cuantos más sentidos usemos en el proceso de aprendizaje, mayor será el porcentaje de retención. Esto significa que si tu hijo puede vivenciar un concepto viéndolo, escuchándolo y hasta quizá tocándolo, ese concepto tendrá mucha más relevancia y permanecerá con él por más tiempo que si solo está leyendo o escuchando sobre el tema. A modo de ejemplo, el experto en aprendizaje basado en el cerebro, Eric Jensen, pregunta qué pasaría si no anduvieras en bicicleta por cinco años, ¿serías capaz de hacerlo después de ese tiempo? Y si no has escuchado el nombre de la capital de Perú por cinco años, ¿aún lo recordarías? La respuesta al desafío de la bicicleta probablemente es un sí, pero la respuesta a la pregunta de la capital de Perú (Lima) sea probablemente un no. Sin embargo, a pesar de saber esto, muchas escuelas siguen insistiendo en transmitir datos a través de los ojos u oídos del estudiante y en que este los retendrá de todas formas.</p> <p>Además, se ha comprobado que el cerebro está mucho más activo cuando realizas actividad física y no cuando permaneces sentado. Eric Jensen me contó: “El cerebro está respondiendo constantemente al estímulo exterior. Si lo comparamos con el ejemplo de estar sentado en una silla, caminar, moverse y todo aprendizaje activo incrementan el flujo sanguíneo y químicos clave que contribuyen con el poder de atención y la memoria a largo plazo (noradrenalina) así como con el esfuerzo y el ánimo (dopamina)”. No obstante, tanto las escuelas como los legisladores se inclinan a pensar que el cuerpo no tiene nada que ver con cómo funciona el cerebro.</p> <p>Finalmente, y este es el dato más importante, según mi perspectiva, hay investigaciones que demuestran que estar sentado en una silla aumenta la fatiga y reduce la concentración (nuestros cuerpos fueron hechos para moverse, no para estar sentados). Aun así, legisladores y escuelas implementan políticas (más evaluaciones; falta de receso; incluso menos recreos para ir al baño) que requieren que el estudiante esté cada vez más tiempo sentado. ¿Qué sentido podría tener?</p> <p>Recuerda ese día en el que te obligaron a sentarte durante interminables minutos y horas en una conferencia, reunión o quizá en un avión. ¿Te sentiste agotado al final de ese día? ¿Te sorprendió sentirte así después de haber estado sentado todo el día? Según estas investigaciones, el agotamiento es un resultado completamente comprensible.</p> <p>En un segmento de la radio BAM, se habló sobre este tema de permanecer sentados en la clase, y la terapeuta ocupacional pediátrica Christy Isbell aseguró:</p> <p>“¿Quién dijo que debemos sentarnos para aprender? ¿Por qué no podemos estar de pie? ¿Por qué no probamos con acostarnos boca abajo o boca arriba en el piso para aprender? ¿Por qué no podemos sentarnos en una mecedora? Existen muchas estrategias simples de movimiento. Solo un cambio de posición puede hacer una gran diferencia”.</p> <p>¡De verdad!</p> <p>Por suerte, hay maestros, e incluso algunas escuelas, que les permiten a los estudiantes sentarse en balones para hacer ejercicio o trabajar de pie alrededor de mesas o escritorios, o moverse cuando tengan ganas. Y los resultados fueron muy estimuladores.</p> <p>En un estudio, investigadores equiparon cuatro clases de primer grado, en Texas, con escritorios altos. Descubrieron que, a pesar de que junto a los escritorios había bancos con la altura apropiada para sentarse, el 70% de los estudiantes nunca los usó, y el 30% restante permaneció de pie gran parte del tiempo. Asimismo, los investigadores concluyeron que el estar de pie incrementaba la capacidad de atención, de alerta, de participación y de concentración entre los estudiantes. ¡Un sueño hecho realidad para cualquier maestro!</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/images/dmImage/SourceImage/brainsitting.jpg" border="0" alt="" width="636" height="355" /></p> <p>¡Esto habla por sí solo! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ECECHAT?src=hash">#ECECHAT</a><a href="https://t.co/y9PRte0CdG" target="_blank">pic.twitter.com/y9PRte0CdG</a></p> <p>— Rae Pica (@raepica1) <a href="https://twitter.com/raepica1/status/783486417548763136" target="_blank">5 de octubre de 2016</a></p> <p>Hace poco, subí en mi twitter la imagen de dos cerebros, publicado por el Dr. Chuck Hillman de la University of Illinois. Una imagen mostraba el cerebro después de que la persona estuvo sentada tranquila, y la otra imagen correspondía a una persona que había caminado por 20 minutos. La diferencia era notable, la última imagen estaba mucho más “iluminada” que la anterior. El mensaje en twitter fue todo un éxito. Me encantó la respuesta de una maestra, Dee Kalman, quien dijo que las imágenes eran la prueba científica de su mantra como docente: “Cuando el cuerpo se entumece, la mente se adormece”.</p> <p>Yo no lo podría haberlo dicho mejor.</p> <p><strong><em>¿Qué deben hacer los padres? Mi consejo:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li> <p>Con la información que tienes ahora, no te preocupes ni te sientas mal si una maestra te menciona que tu hijo tiene dificultades para quedarse quieto. No es natural ni saludable que un niño permanezca sentado por mucho tiempo, y tampoco es beneficioso para el aprendizaje. (Personalmente, estaría más preocupada por un niño, típicamente una niña, que con su deseo de complacer alcanza un nivel alto de docilidad y un nivel anormal de quietud).</p> </li> <li> <p>Si tu hijo está teniendo dificultades porque lo obligan a permanecer sentado, reúne toda la información que sea posible antes de conversar con la maestra acerca de otras posibilidades (por ejemplo, descansos para la mente, que se les permita a los estudiantes pararse o moverse cuando lo necesiten, sentarse en un balón para hacer ejercicio). Ten presente que estas investigaciones se aplican en la gran mayoría de los niños así que no estarás pidiendo que tengan consideración especial por tu hijo únicamente.</p> </li> <li> <p>Inspírate en los Starrett, que recaudaron dinero para llevar escritorios altos a la clase de cuarto grado de su hija, y luego a la escuela primaria entera.</p> </li> <li> <p>Si la escuela de tu hijo está dentro de ese 40% de escuelas primarias en EE. UU. que eliminaron el receso, ¡lucha para recuperarlo! El cerebro y el cuerpo de los niños necesitan descansos frecuentes (ampliaremos este tema en una próxima publicación). Puedes obtener más información para ser un defensor de los recesos en el sitio web de la American Association for the Child’s Right to Play (www.ipausa.org).</p> </li> <li> <p>¡Compensa el tiempo que tu hijo permanece sentado en la escuela con actividades en tu casa! Limita el tiempo frente a una pantalla, televisión y equipos digitales, e incentiva a tu hijo a que salga a jugar. Si estimulas a tu hijo para que salga a jugar y haga una actividad, es más probable que lo haga. Si necesita un impulso extra, ¡ve afuera y juega con él!</p> </li> </ul> <p><em>Rae Pica lleva mensajes sobre el desarrollo y la educación del niño a padres y educadores de toda América del Norte. </em><em>Su último libro es “What If Everybody Understood Child Development?: Straight Talk About Bettering Education and Children’s Lives”. </em><em>Puedes conocerla mejor en www.raepica.com y seguirla en @raepica1. </em></p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:45.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:39:04.38
DESCRIPTION Is it fair to ask kids to sit still for what feels like an eternity?
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit about why sitting doesn't always equal learning.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT It's hard for kids to sit still during the school day. But is it necessary? Learn more here:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Debunking the Belief That Sitting Equals Learning
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID FBF78040-A117-11E6-89870050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
PUBLISHDATE 2016-11-07 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Sitting Doesn't Equal Learning
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES Comienza otro año escolar y los niños de todo el país llegan a la escuela, donde deberán permanecer sentados por minutos y horas, y absorber información a través de sus ojos, sus oídos y sus asientos.
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Sitting Doesn't Equal Learning
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Is it even fair to ask young kids, who by nature’s design are the most energetic among us, to stay still for what must seem like an eternity?
TEASERES Comienza otro año escolar y los niños de todo el país llegan a la escuela, donde deberán permanecer sentados por minutos y horas, y absorber información a través de sus ojos, sus oídos y sus asientos.
TEASERIMAGE BD044AF0-1951-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Debunking the Belief That Sitting Equals Learning
TITLEES Derribar la idea de que estar sentado en clase es sinónimo de aprender
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET It might not be necessary for kids to sit still during the entire school day. Learn why:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 FC1FB5B0-BB16-11E6-89870050569A5318

Father Son Talking

Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1sXEcTP
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Deciding when and how to talk to kids about alcohol and drug use can be a big decision. With all the other difficult conversations parents have with kids, this one might not be the most pressing on the agenda. But how your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have a life-long effect and serious consequences. To continue our series on these tough talks, we talked to a panel of our Parent Toolkit experts for their advice.</p> <blockquote>“The average age that many children start being exposed to alcohol is 13, some at 12; and now evidence is showing that this might be much earlier,” says Stephen Wallace, director of the Center for Adolescent Research and Education. “It’s important for parent to talk about these issues at different junctures, especially when these behaviors typically occur.”</blockquote> <p><span class="white"><span class="white"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Learn more about ways you can nurture your child's social and emotional well-being</a>.</span></span></p> <p>According to the Centers for Disease Control, 19 percent of high school students admitted to drinking more than a few sips of alcohol before the age of 13. When asked if they’d had at least one drink of alcohol in their lifetime, that number jumps to 66 percent. Our experts overwhelmingly recommend talking about alcohol as soon as possible, and many recommend starting in the later elementary years.</p> <blockquote>“There really is no guarantee that your child will not drink,” says parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba. “But you can produce a child who is less likely to binge drink or abuse alcohol at a younger and younger age. And here’s the secret – it’s called hands-on parenting.”</blockquote> <p>Part of that hands-on parenting is identifying your family’s values and making sure that as a role model, you stick to those values, says Borba. Children will learn from you at an early age, whether you need a drink after a rough day at work, or have to stock the fridge before having company come over. And beyond simply modeling responsible behavior, you should also communicate your values with your child. Just because you talked to them once, Borba says, doesn’t mean it’s going to stick. It needs to be an on-going conversation.</p> <blockquote>“In my research, I found that many boys have never talked to their parents about these issues,” explains Wallace. “Research shows that parents who do communicate their expectations have children who are more likely to meet those expectations.”</blockquote> <p>Try to work the conversations into every day interactions so they feel more natural. Wallace says a car ride is a perfect time to start a conversation; you essentially have a captive audience. Before bed works well too----anytime when you have more than 5 minutes to actually talk to each other. You can use lyrics in songs, or other things you pick up from your child’s culture, as a jumping off point for the conversation.</p> <blockquote>“Kids need to understand that this is something that adults do. If it’s something you want to do as an adult, you can do it,” explains Maurice Elias, director of the Rutgers Social-Emotional Learning Lab. He points out that the conversation may be slightly different if you live in a state that has recently legalized marijuana, like Colorado. Often, kids don’t see the risk involved with drugs that have recently been made legal. And nationwide, according to the CDC, 41 percent of high school students have tried marijuana at least once. Even in Colorado and other states, there’s still an age requirement for use.</blockquote> <blockquote>“It’s a different conversation. Kids have to understand that there’s a legal age that you can do this and that’s the law,” he says. “And if the law changes, then the age changes.”</blockquote> <p>Above all, the conversation needs to continue as your child ages and starts experimenting. Dr. Elias explains that parents should try to have a certain level of understanding, drawing on their own experience if necessary. Sometimes just remembering what it was like when you were growing up can have a profound effect on your ability to relate to your child. It’s likely that even if you didn’t experiment growing up, you had friends who did. When having the talk with your child, the overall agreement among our experts is that “just say no” isn’t a realistic conversation.</p> <blockquote>“If you close the door, and just say no, you run the risk of them saying yes,” explains education consultant Jennifer Miller. “Co-creating social rules together is the best policy. You want to respect your teen enough to want them to formulate their thoughts, but at the same time you need to set limits on what they should and shouldn’t do.”</blockquote> <p>These limits can include requiring that the parents be home when he visits friends and enforcing a curfew. Dr. Borba says role-playing with your teens about what to say if he doesn’t want to drink or use drugs can be extremely helpful for teens when they are trying to stand up to peer pressure. And offer an “out” for your child – a code word or text that means “I need an excuse to leave” or “you need to pick me up.” It could be a text of just “11111” or a quick call of “I think I got food poisoning.” This allows your child to remove themselves from a situation by contacting you without needing to explain to peers what is happening.</p> <blockquote>“You need to know that peer pressure will trump values at home,” says Borba. “Give the teen a comeback line, even if they have to lie and say they’re taking cold medicine or something.”</blockquote> <p>And don’t forget the power of speaking with your child’s friends’ parents and guardians.</p> <blockquote>“The best defense is a good offense,” Borba says. “Team up with your kids’ friends’ parents. Ideally, you all come up with the same rules.”</blockquote> <p>If you all share similar values about your children’s use or abstinence of alcohol and drugs, you can work together to monitor each other’s kids and even enforce the same rules across the board so your child can’t say “everyone else’s parents let them do it.”</p> <blockquote>“For us, normally my husband will tell my son that he can blame it on him,” says parent advisor and mother of two Mercedes Sandoval. “My husband doesn’t care if his friends think he’s mean.”</blockquote> <p>While there may be a temptation to be the “cool” parent, at the end of the day you’re still the parent, reminds Borba. Not only do your choices and strictness or lenience affect your child, but it can also affect you. Borba recommends monitoring what happens in your home, meaning no closed doors, and if you suspect a child’s been drinking, take their car keys. They may ultimately be your responsibility whether or not they’re your child.</p> <p>When it comes to talking with your child, one of the best approaches is to frame the conversation in a way that focuses on you and the family, and not just overtly preventing your child from using alcohol or drugs. </p> <blockquote>“These talks should be brief and to the point,” says Wallace. “Parents should use ‘I’ statements instead of ‘you’ statements. Instead of ‘you seem like you’re going out with your friend a lot,’ say ‘I notice that there are a lot of nights that you are out late with your friends.’”</blockquote> <p>Wallace explains that “you” statements can seem accusatory whereas “I” statements are about coming from a place of concern. Kids will often respect the conversation more if it is born out of your care and concern, rather than feeling like a lecture.</p> <p>At the end of the day, the most important thing is to continue to talk with your child. Keep the lines of communication open and sometimes just listen when your child needs someone to confide in. And if they don’t confide in you, try to make sure there’s an older sibling, family member, or trusted friend that they can go to. Having a support system will help your child navigate the difficult adolescent years and will help to keep them out of trouble.</p> <blockquote>“The number one issue for parents is to make sure their relationship is the absolutely most important thing they do preserve,” explains Dr. Elias. “The relationship with the child is still the most critical issue that in the long run will keep your child on the right path.”</blockquote> <p class="Body"><em>This is the last post in our week-long series — Tough Talks— where we’ve surveyed a handful of our Parent Toolkit experts to see what they recommend for parents to make tough conversations go more smoothly. </em></p> <p><em>If you or someone you know would like more information about the issue, please visit</em><em> <a href="http://www.drugfree.org/">http://www.drugfree.org/</a>.</em></p>
BODYES <p>Hablar con tus hijos sobre el consumo de drogas y alcohol es una decisión muy importante, especialmente cuando tienes que elegir el momento y cómo hacerlo. Y si consideramos todos los temas difíciles que los padres tienen que charlar con sus hijos, esta charla probablemente no sea la más urgente en el orden del día. Pero la relación que desarrolle tu hijo con el alcohol y las drogas tendrá importantes consecuencias para el resto de su vida. Para continuar con nuestra serie de charlas sobre temas difíciles, recurrimos al asesoramiento de nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit.</p> <blockquote>“En promedio, muchos niños comienzan a tener contacto con el alcohol a partir de los 13 años, algunos a los 12 y nuevas estadísticas y evidencias demuestran que podría ser mucho antes”, cuenta Stephen Wallace, director del Centro de investigación y educación para adolescentes. “Es importante que los padres hablen sobre estos temas en las diferentes etapas críticas de la vida de los hijos, especialmente en las edades donde normalmente comienzan a ocurrir estas conductas”.</blockquote> <p>Conoce más formas en las que puedes contribuir al bienestar social y emocional de tus hijos.</p> <p>Según los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades, el 19% de los estudiantes de escuela secundaria admitieron haber tomado más que algunos sorbos de alcohol antes de cumplir los 13 años. Y al preguntarles si habían tomado al menos una vez un trago de una bebida alcohólica en su vida, la cifra se eleva al 66%. Nuestros expertos son unánimes en su recomendación: debes hablar con tus hijos sobre el alcohol lo antes que puedas. Algunos incluso recomiendan hacerlo durante los últimos años de la escuela primaria.</p> <blockquote>“No existe ninguna garantía de que tu hijo no beberá”, aclara la Dra. Michele Borba, experta en crianza. “Pero puedes criar a tus hijos para que tengan menos chance de ser bebedores empedernidos ni abusen del consumo de alcohol a edades cada vez más tempranas. Y ese es el secreto: hay que hacerse cargo de la crianza de los hijos”.</blockquote> <p>Parte de esta premisa es identificar los valores familiares y asegurarse de que, como modelo a seguir, tú te apegues a esos valores, explica Borba. Los niños aprenden de ti, desde pequeños, ya sea que tomes un trago después de un día difícil en el trabajo o que compres bebidas y llenes el refrigerador cuando esperas visitas. Además de enseñarle conductas responsables, también debes comunicar tus valores a tus hijos. Solo porque los menciones una vez, aclara Borba, no significa que se hayan grabado a fuego. Tiene que ser un tema de conversación permanente.</p> <blockquote>“Durante mis investigaciones descubrí que muchos niños nunca hablaron con sus padres sobre estos temas”, explica Wallace. “Las investigaciones demuestran que los padres que comunican sus expectativas tienen hijos más propensos a cumplir con esas expectativas”.</blockquote> <p>Intenta incluir estas conversaciones en tus interacciones cotidianas para que sean más naturales. Wallace sugiere que un paseo en auto es la ocasión ideal para iniciar una conversación de este tipo ya que tienes una audiencia que no puede escapar. Antes de ir a dormir también puede ser un buen momento... de hecho, cualquier ocasión en la que tengan más de 5 minutos para charlar. Como un disparador de la charla puedes recurrir a las letras de canciones u otras cosas que les interesen a tus hijos</p> <blockquote>“Los niños necesitan comprender que es algo que hacen los adultos. Si es algo que quieres hacer cuando seas adulto, puedes hacerlo”, explica Maurice Elias, Director del laboratorio de aprendizaje socio-emocional Rutgers.</blockquote> <p>Aunque señala que la conversación podría ser un poco diferente si vives en un estado en el que recientemente se haya legalizado la marihuana, como por ejemplo en Colorado. Muchas veces los jóvenes no ven los riesgos asociados con las drogas que se han legalizado recientemente. Y según CDC, en todo el país, el 41% de los estudiantes secundarios han probado la marihuana al menos una vez. Pero en Colorado y en los demás estados, debes ser mayor de determinada edad para consumir.</p> <blockquote>“Es una conversación diferente. Los jóvenes deben comprender que hay un límite legal de edad para poder hacerlo, y hay que respetar la ley”, aclara. “Si la ley cambia, entonces el límite de edad cambiará”.</blockquote> <p>Pero, sobre todo, la conversación debe continuar a medida que tu hijo crezca y comience a experimentar. El Dr. Elias explica que los padres deberían intentar adquirir un cierto nivel de comprensión, haciendo uso de su propia experiencia si fuera necesario. A veces, el recordar cómo eran las cosas cuando tú eras niño puede tener un gran efecto en tu habilidad para relacionarte con tu hijo. Es probable que si tú no experimentaste con drogas, seguramente tuviste amigos que lo hicieron. Nuestros expertos están de acuerdo en que plantear el tema desde la perspectiva del “solo di no” no es realista.</p> <blockquote>“Si cierras la puerta, y solo le dices que no, corres el riesgo de que ellos digan sí”, explica Jennifer Miller, consultora en educación. “Crear juntos las reglas es la mejor política. Respeta a tus hijos adolescentes lo suficiente para que se sientan cómodos y expresen sus ideas, pero al mismo tiempo pon límites a lo que deben y no deberían hacer”.</blockquote> <p>Estos límites pueden ser exigir que los padres estén en casa cuando vayan de visita a casa de amigos y que cumplan con el horario de regreso. La Dra. Borba aconseja ensayar juegos de rol con tus hijos para practicar qué deben decir si no quieren beber alcohol o consumir drogas. Esto puede ser extremadamente útil para los adolescentes cuando deben enfrentarse a la presión de sus pares, y también dales una “salida”: una palabra o mensaje en clave que signifique “necesito una excusa para irme” o “ven a buscarme”. Puede ser un mensaje de texto “11111” o una llamada rápida avisando que “creo que me cayó mal la comida”. Esto le permitirá a tu hijo alejarse de una situación incómoda recurriendo a tu ayuda y sin tener que explicar a sus amigos lo que ocurre.</p> <blockquote>“Debes saber que la presión de los pares echará por tierra los valores que les enseñes en tu casa”, dice Borba. “Ofrécele a tu hijo una respuesta ingeniosa, aún si tiene que mentir y decir que tiene que tomar un remedio o algo así”.</blockquote> <p>Y no olvides lo importante que es hablar con los padres o tutores de los amigos de tus hijos.</p> <blockquote>“La mejor defensa es una buena ofensiva”, explica Borba. “Debes aliarte con los padres de los amigos de tus hijos. Lo ideal es que todos sigan las mismas reglas”.</blockquote> <p>Si comparten los mismos valores con respecto al consumo o abstinencia de alcohol y drogas, pueden colaborar entre todos para vigilar a sus hijos y hasta hacer que cumplan con las mismas reglas, entonces tus hijos no pondrán como excusa que “los otros padres los dejan hacerlo”.</p> <blockquote>“En mi caso, mi marido le dice a mi hijo que puede echarle la culpa a él”, cuenta Mercedes Sandoval, asesora y madre de dos. “A mi marido no le importa si sus amigos piensan que es malo”.</blockquote> <p>Si bien existe la tentación de querer ser un papá cool, Borba nos recuerda que, al fin y al cabo, seguimos siendo los padres. Nuestras elecciones y nuestra severidad o indulgencia no solo afectan a nuestros hijos, también nos puede afectar a nosotros. Borba recomienda controlar lo que ocurra en tu casa, nada de andar con las puertas cerradas. Y si sospechas que alguno de los chicos estuvo bebiendo, quítale las llaves del auto. También son tu responsabilidad, no importa si es tu propio hijo o no.</p> <p>Cuando se trata de hablar con un hijo, una de las mejores formas es encarar la conversación de manera que se centre en ti y en la familia, no solo en evitar abiertamente que tu hijo consuma drogas o alcohol.</p> <blockquote>“Deben ser conversaciones breves y concisas”, aclara Wallace. “Los padres deberían usar la primera persona; por ejemplo, en vez de decir “estás saliendo mucho con tu amigo”, puedes decir “noté que van varias noches que sales hasta tarde con tus amigos”.</blockquote> <p>Wallace explica que el usar la segunda persona en tus charlas puede sonar como que estás haciendo una acusación. En cambio, si usas la primera persona, todo lo que digas se originará desde un lugar de genuina preocupación. Los niños respetan mucho más una conversación si perciben que nace desde tu preocupación e interés por su bienestar, que si perciben que los estás aleccionando.</p> <p>Porque, a final de cuentas, lo más importante es que puedas continuar hablando con tu hijo. Mantén las líneas de comunicación abiertas. Cuando tu hijo necesite confiar en ti para contarte algo, solo escúchalo. Si no se siente cómodo contándotelo a ti, asegúrate de que pueda recurrir a un hermano mayor, a un miembro de la familia o a un amigo de confianza. Contar con una red de apoyo le ayudará a tus hijos a navegar las difíciles aguas de la adolescencia y mantenerse alejados de los problemas.</p> <blockquote>“La cuestión primordial para los padres es asegurarse de que su relación con los hijos sea lo más importante para proteger”, explica el Dr. Elias. “La relación con los hijos es fundamental para que, a la larga, tu hijos se mantengan en el sendero correcto”.</blockquote> <p><em>Esta es la última publicación de nuestra serie semanal, Charlas difíciles, donde consultamos a nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones para que los padres puedan hablar en forma más cómoda sobre estos temas espinosos.</em></p> <p><em>Si tú o alguien que conoces desea obtener más información sobre este tema, pueden visitar <a href="http://www.drugfree.org/">http://www.drugfree.org/</a>.</em></p>
CATHTML F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5
CMLABEL Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol
CREATEDBY coreysnyder_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED [empty string]
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:43:58.297
DESCRIPTION How your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have serious consequences. We talked to a panel of our Parent Toolkit experts for their advice.
DESCRIPTIONES Hablar con tus hijos sobre el consumo de drogas y alcohol es una decisión muy importante, especialmente cuando tienes que elegir el momento y cómo hacerlo.
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about talking to your kids about drugs and alcohol:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT A panel of Parent Toolkit experts offers advice on starting this tough but important conversation.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol
LASTUPDATEDBY coreysnyder_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0D969620-5AC4-11E4-A1220050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-10-24 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs & Alcohol
SEOTITLEES Cómo hablar sobre las drogas y el alcohol
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER How your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have a life-long effect and serious consequences.
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE How Do You Talk to Your Kids About Drugs & Alcohol?
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Deciding when and how to talk to kids about alcohol and drug use can be a big decision. With all the other difficult conversations parents have with kids, this one might not be the most pressing on the agenda. But how your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have a life-long effect and serious consequences. To continue our series on these tough talks, we talked to a panel of our Parent Toolkit experts for their advice.
TEASERES Hablar con tus hijos sobre el consumo de drogas y alcohol es una decisión muy importante, especialmente cuando tienes que elegir el momento y cómo hacerlo.
TEASERIMAGE F99933D0-1FDD-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol
TITLEES Charlas difíciles: cómo hablar con tus hijos sobre las drogas y el alcohol
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Check out expert advice on how to have this tough but important conversation about drugs & alcohol @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Active Kids

Keeping Kids Active

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1QM362e
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1Mo5oU3
BODY <p>Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day. Here’s some ideas!</p>
BODYES <p>El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas! </p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-05-19 12:33:25.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:12.96
DESCRIPTION Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on how you can take advantage of your local parks and community organizations during the summertime.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/130322601?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/130323019?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/130322601
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/130323019
FACEBOOKTEXT Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day.
FACEBOOKTEXTES El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas!
LABEL Keeping Kids Active
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID C5387400-FE44-11E4-959C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2015-05-19 12:33:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Keeping Kids Active During the Summertime
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Keeping Kids Active
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Keeping Kids Active During the Summertime
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day. Here’s some ideas! Find out more watching the Summer Success video series at ParentToolkit.com.
TEASERES El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas!
TEASERIMAGE D5FC02B0-18A6-11E7-8E3F0050569A4B6C
TITLE Keeping Kids Active
TITLEES Promover La Actividad Física De Los Niños
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Vídeo: El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas!
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 89BE98A0-9B08-11E3-A6F30050569A5318
2 84B78F00-9B09-11E3-A6F30050569A5318
3 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

kid with kite

Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1WrmKZm
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p><em>60 minutes a day.</em></p> <p>That is what the current <a href="http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/">Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans</a> recommend as a minimum for daily physical activity.</p> <p>Only about half of youth in the United States are getting that.</p> <p>Promoting physical activity can be a daunting task for some parents. But research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is extremely important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.</p> <p>The Institute of Medicine of the National Academics published a <a href="http://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2013/Educating-the-Student-Body-Taking-Physical-Activity-and-Physical-Education-to-School.aspx">report</a> in May 2013, finding extensive scientific evidence that regular physical activity improves a child’s mental and cognitive health.</p> <p>The report found “Children who are more active show greater attention, have faster cognitive processing speed, and perform better on standardized academic tests than children who are less active.”</p> <p>Many parents wonder how they can enhance their child’s physical activity with busy schedules and limited time.</p> <p>The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia physician Dr. Shirley Huang has three tips for parents: “Keep it simple, keep it fun, and keep it up with someone.”</p> <h4><strong>Keep it simple.</strong></h4> <p>“Even though we all try to overextend ourselves to try to reach goals that are overambitious, it's more helpful to keep your activity goal simple.  We all have busy lives in different ways.  So even if your goal is to walk the dog for 15 minutes right after dinner together, this is a perfect goal if you can actually accomplish this realistically,” Huang said.</p> <p>Miami-Dade County Public School District Director of Physical Education Dr. Jayne Greenberg said starting simple means being a role model for your children.</p> <p>“We encourage parents to be active with their children,” Greenberg said. “Do simple things that incorporate physical activity into the everyday: walks after dinner, a family bike ride, Frisbee in the park…anything that gets you all moving together.”</p> <h4><strong>Keep if fun.</strong></h4> <p>“People often think about 'exercise' as the means for physical activity.  For some people this may be the case, for others, it may not be.  Fun may mean different things to different people.  Some people love running, others hate it.  Some people love going to the gym, others avoid the gym.  Some people love biking.  Some people love playing basketball with other kids on the street.  Some people love taking a walk and catching up with friend.  Whatever activity you are considering doing, make sure you are having fun doing it!” Huang said.</p> <p>The Miami-Dade School District has incorporated a variety of activities in to their physical education program. Kayaking, paddle boarding, Dance Dance Revolution and climbing walls encourage children to enjoy their physical activity.</p> <p> “It starts with fun,” Greenberg said. “If physical activity is fun, you will get kids participating.”</p> <p>While not all schools have the kind of program that Miami-Dade does, Greenberg said giving your child options in their activities helps them to take control of their healthy lifestyle.</p> <p>“There are intramurals, clubs, swimming lessons, walking, going to the park,” Greenberg said. “There are so many easy ways to add activity that is fun and beneficial to a child’s day.”</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=07E69710-D0B4-11E3-87440050569A5318" target="_blank">Read: A Teen's Guide's for Parents: What Never to Say About My Body</a></p> <h4><strong>Keep it up with someone</strong>. </h4> <p>“How many times have you had such a hard time getting yourself to do something, but then when you actually do it, you enjoy it?  Motivation to get yourself started is always the hardest part.  Sometimes having a buddy to keep you accountable is the key to get yourself moving.  Make plans to walk with your family.  Meet your classmate at the gym.  Commit to walking your dog who may be your best friend.  Share an activity with someone who can help you keep on track with being active!” Huang said.</p> <p>Greenberg remembered walking or biking to school every day with friends when she was young.</p> <p>“Now we are afraid to let our kids walk on the street alone,” Greenberg said. “You don’t see kids playing on the streets anymore. So parents have to find ways to engage their children with other activities and other people.”</p> <p>Greenberg suggests the walking school bus. A walking school bus is a group of children walking to school with at least one adult. And it is just as simple as it sounds. It only takes a couple families to take turns walking with their children to school.</p> <p>By including another family in your daily walk to school, you are more motivated to keep up with it. You can find a printable guide to the walking school bus <a href="http://www.walkingschoolbus.org/WalkingSchoolBus_pdf.pdf">here</a>.</p> <p>“It is little changes and education,” Greenberg said. “Our kids are getting it. We are using them as the change agents. They are the ones encouraging their parents now. They have changed their lifestyles.”</p> <p>When parents prioritize physical activity, they prioritize educating the whole child. “Academics, health, body, mind, creativity,” Greenberg said. “They are all connected.”</p>
BODYES <p><em>60 minutos por día.</em></p> <p>Ese es el tiempo mínimo que recomienda Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans para actividad física diaria.</p> <p>Solo alrededor de la mitad de los jóvenes en Estados Unidos lo cumple.</p> <p>Fomentar la actividad física puede ser una tarea abrumadora para algunos padres. Sin embargo, distintas investigaciones sugieren que incentivar a tu hijo a hacer ejercicio en los primeros años es muy importante, no solo para evitar la obesidad infantil, sino también para contribuir en su rendimiento académico.</p> <p>The Institute of Medicine of the National Academics publicó un informe en mayo de 2013, en el que se mencionaba la existencia de evidencia científica que demuestra que la actividad física regular mejora la salud mental y cognitiva del joven.</p> <p>El informe indicó también que “los niños que son más activos desarrollan un mayor poder de atención, sus procesos cognitivos son más rápidos y tienen un mejor desempeño en pruebas académicas estandarizadas respecto de los niños menos activos”.</p> <p>Muchos padres se preguntan cómo pueden aumentar la actividad física de su hijo con cronogramas llenos de actividades y poco tiempo libre.</p> <p>Una médica de The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, la Dra. Shirley Huang, tiene tres consejos para los padres: “Que sea simple, divertido y compartido”.</p> <h4>QUE SEA SIMPLE</h4> <p>“Si bien todos intentamos multiplicarnos para alcanzar objetivos por demás ambiciosos, es esencial reconocer que es más útil fijarse un objetivo simple. Todos estamos ocupados en distintas cosas. Entonces, si tu objetivo es sacar a pasear a tu perro por 15 minutos después de cenar, es un objetivo perfecto, si puedes lograrlo”, aseguró Huang.</p> <p>La directora de Educación Física del distrito escolar de Miami-Dade County, la Dra. Jayne Greenberg, sostuvo que comenzar con un objetivo simple se traduce en un modelo ejemplificador para tu hijo.</p> <p>“Alentamos a los padres a que se muestren activos frente a sus hijos”, agregó Greenberg. “Haz cosas simples para incorporar la actividad física en tu vida diaria: caminar después de la cena, andar en bicicleta con la familia, jugar al Frisbee en el parque…cualquier actividad que les permita moverse juntos”.</p> <h4>QUE SEA DIVERTIDO</h4> <p>“Se suele pensar en el ‘ejercicio’ como el recurso de la actividad física. Para algunos es así, para otros, no. La diversión puede significar distintas cosas para cada individuo. Algunas personas aman correr, otras lo odian. Algunas personas adoran ir al gimnasio, otras lo evitan. A algunas personas les encanta andar en bicicleta. A otras les gusta jugar al básquetbol con otros niños en la calle. Algunos prefieren caminar y ponerse al día con un amigo. ¡No importa qué actividad elijas, asegúrate de divertirte cuando la hagas!”, sugirió Huang.</p> <p>El distrito escolar de Miami-Dade ha incorporado una variedad de actividades en su programa de educación física. Kayak, surf de remo, <em>Dance Dance Revolution</em> y la escalada de muros estimulan a los niños a disfrutar de la actividad física.</p> <p>“Comienza con diversión”, aseguró Greenberg. “Si la actividad física es divertida, tus hijos participarán”.</p> <p>Si bien no todas las escuelas tienen el tipo de programa que sí ofrece Miami-Dade, Greenberg sostiene que darle opciones a tu hijo en sus actividades los ayuda a tener control de un estilo de vida saludable.</p> <p>“Hay actividades en organizaciones, clubs, clases de natación, caminatas, paseos en el parque”, según Greenberg. “Hay muchas formas simples de sumar actividades que sean divertidas y beneficiosas para tu hijo”.</p> <h4>QUE SEA COMPARTIDO</h4> <p>“¿Cuántas veces tuviste que hacer un gran esfuerzo para hacer algo, pero luego mientras lo haces te das cuenta de que lo disfrutas? Motivarte para comenzar una actividad es la parte más difícil. A veces, compartir la actividad con un amigo genera una responsabilidad que es la clave para llevar adelante esa actividad. Organízate para salir a caminar con tu familia. Reúnete con tu compañero de clase en el gimnasio. Comprométete a sacar a pasear a tu perro, que puede ser tu mejor amigo. ¡Comparte una actividad para ayudarte a sostenerla y mantenerte activo!”, agregó Huang.</p> <p>Greenberg recordó que iba a la escuela caminando o en bicicleta con amigos cuando era joven.</p> <p>“Ahora tenemos miedo de dejar que nuestros hijos caminen solos por la calle”, destacó Greenberg. “Ya no ves a niños jugando en la calle. Entonces los padres tienen que encontrar la forma de involucrar a sus hijos en otras actividades y que las compartan con otras personas”.</p> <p>Greenberg sugiere el autobús escolar a pie. Se trata de un grupo de niños que va caminando a la escuela con, al menos, un adulto. Así de simple como suena. Solo tendrán que turnarse entre las familias para acompañar a sus hijos.</p> <p>Al incluir a otra familia en tu caminata diaria a la escuela, te sentirás más motivado. Aquí podrás encontrar una guía para imprimir sobre este “autobús”.</p> <p>“Se trata de pequeños cambios y educación. Nuestros hijos lo están entendiendo. Los usamos como los agentes del cambio. Ellos son quienes incentivan a sus padres. Han cambiado sus estilos de vida”, comentó Greenberg.</p> <p>Cuando los padres priorizan la actividad física, priorizan la educación integral. “Escuela, salud, cuerpo, mente, creatividad. Todo está conectado”, concluyó Greenberg.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
CMLABEL Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:29:12.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:28:25.89
DESCRIPTION Research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is very important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit on educating the whole child, physically and academically.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is very important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 7B2EDE80-7F18-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2015-11-02 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Educating Your Child: Physically and Academically
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER <p><em>60 minutes a day. </em>That is what the current <a href="http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/">Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans</a> recommend as a minimum for daily physical activity. Only about half of youth in the United States are getting that. Promoting physical activity can be a daunting task for some parents. But research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is extremely important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.</p>
SHORTTEASERES 60 minutos por día. Ese es el tiempo mínimo que recomienda Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans para actividad física diaria.
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is extremely important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.
TEASERES 60 minutos por día. Ese es el tiempo mínimo que recomienda Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans para actividad física diaria.
TEASERIMAGE D6F2D200-236B-11E7-A4840050569A4B6C
TITLE Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
TITLEES Educación integral: actividad física y rendimiento académico
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Helpful advice on educating the whole child, physically and academically via @EducationNation:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Mom arm around daughter

Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Transitions are often a challenging time for many families. Whether it’s going to middle school, going into high school, going to college, or entering the workforce full-time, any major life change comes with mixed emotions. You may be excited one minute and scared or stressed the next. That’s completely normal, and normal for your kids, too. When young adults leave high school or college, the future can seem overwhelming.</p> <p>As a parent, your role in your kids’ lives change as they grow up, but maintaining an open line of communication can be beneficial for everyone.  One of those benefits is on mental health. Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, and an open dialogue, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.</p> <p><strong>What Is “Normal?”</strong></p> <p>Clinical psychologist Dr. Bobbi Wegner has parents who often come to her with concerns about their student’s transition into or out of college. She says that many kids go through adjustment issues, and it’s completely normal. But often young adults and their parents aren’t expecting these feelings to come up, so when they do, there is a heightened sense of worry.</p> <p>“Anxiety and depression is the common cold of mental health, but people don’t talk a lot about it,” Wegner says. “As a parent, a part of helping is normalizing anxiety, and feeling low or depression can be a ‘normal’ part of the experience.”</p> <p>“Normal” difficulties during transition times include increased anxiety, depression, and relationship issues. Young adults can have a hard time making new friends in the work place or at school and start to feel lonely or isolated. Increased workload and responsibilities can contribute to stress. Raising their awareness that those feelings are valid can go a long way.</p> <p><strong>Be Prepared</strong></p> <p>UCLA’s Executive Director of Counseling and Psychological Services Dr. Nicole Presley Green’s biggest advice to parents is to be proactive before there is a problem. Knowing what resources are available on campus, like student counseling centers, is a great step to being prepared. Similarly, making sure your young adult knows about their insurance information can help prepare them should they need to seek care at any point.</p> <p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="/advice-tips/physical-health-and-young-adults-a-parent-s-guide">Guide to Young Adult Health Care</a></p> <p>Being prepared also means maintaining an open line of communication between you and your young adult. That doesn’t mean you have to call them every few hours, but simply letting them know they can call you or reach out whenever they need to. Keep in mind that you’ve been with your kid for most of their life; you know what is normal for them.</p> <p>“It’s a really challenging time for parents. They don’t know how much to let them flourish and flounder, and how much to get involved,” Dr. Green says. “But they do know when their kid is really reaching a point where they need help.”</p> <p><strong>Know the Red Flags</strong></p> <p>As a parent, hearing that it’s “normal” might not help when you’re worried whether or not your kid is able to handle their new world. Fortunately, there are ways for you to help identify whether or not something more serious is going on.</p> <p>Dr. Wegner recommends keeping an eye out for any major changes in behavior in three categories she calls the “holy trilogy of health”:sleeping, eating, and energy. Any major shift in any of those areas (eating much more, eating much less, sleeping much more, sleeping much less, etc.) can be a red flag and a time for you to get curious and ask more about what is going on with your kid.</p> <p>Psychologist Dr. Michele Borba recommends keeping a few questions in mind when you’re talking and listening with your young adult. Ask yourself: </p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>Does he seem to be adjusting?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does she have new friends?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does he seem happy?</p> </li> <li> <p>Are they joining in activities, like going to the gym or joining a club?</p> </li> <li> <p>Do they seem to have pride in their work or school? (For example, “<strong>Our</strong> team just got on a new project,” or “<strong>My</strong> school was listed as one of the top in the state.”)</p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>If you answer “yes” to these questions, it’s likely your teen is adjusting well, even if they say they’re stressed or sad. If they are showing no connections, or no interest in making new friends or getting involved, Dr. Borba says that is a “red flag” that there could be trouble ahead.</p> <p><strong>Acknowledge, Empathize, and Be Intentional</strong></p> <p>Ways to support your young adult are to acknowledge their feelings, empathize with them, and be intentional about the questions you ask. Often, when young adults reach out to parents in times of struggle, they’re looking for support or a shoulder to cry on. Dismissing their feelings or trying to fix their problems for them is a surefire way to end the conversation completely.</p> <p>For example, if your teen is feeling anxious or depressed, don’t dismiss those feelings by saying “That’s not something to be stressed about,” or “Everyone feels like that.” Similarly, trying to fix the problem also isn’t the answer. If your kid says they “don’t have any friends” don’t point out all the friends they had in high school, or their new coworker. It may be that they mean they don’t have the same strong friendships they used to have, which is something that can make them feel isolated or lonely.</p> <p>Instead, be intentional in your responses and turn the question or concern back to them. Dr. Wegner says this is a common tactic used by therapists to validate a patient’s concern, and empower them to find the answers themselves. You could try asking:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>“I’m sorry to hear you’re feeling that way. Why do you think that is?</p> </li> <li> <p>“It sounds like you don’t want to go to class, why is that?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“What do you think is going on?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“What have you tried to make you feel better?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“How can I help you?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“I’ve noticed X, how are you feeling about that?”</p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>Simply by listening, and allowing your young adult to come to conclusions on their own, you’re empowering them to understand more about their feelings and address them.</p> <p><strong>Let</strong> <strong>Your Kids Know It’s O.K. to Ask for Help</strong></p> <p>Asking for help, especially for mental health, is often stigmatized in America. But it doesn’t have to be. For college students, most counseling centers are a free resource that anyone can use. For young adults not enrolled in college, <a href="http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/parity-guide.aspx">most health insurance plans</a> also offer mental health coverage. So visits to a therapist or psychiatrist are often covered in some form. And as far as that stigma, Dr. Wegner says there shouldn’t be shame in asking for help if you need it, even if the situation isn’t dire.</p> <p>“People think it’s something you should only do if you’re clinically depressed and that’s not true,” Wegner says. “You don’t have to make a commitment, and you don’t have to go forever. Sometimes just a few sessions and then moving on can be helpful.”</p> <p>Dr. Green does a lot of outreach on campus to try and decrease stigma associated with getting help. In some cases, that can be recommending parents encourage students to seek help in any way that seems accessible to them. For example, if therapy seems to scary, parents can suggest their students to talk with their RA as a first step.</p> <p><strong>When to Get Professional Help</strong></p> <p>First and foremost, trust your gut instinct. Dr. Green reminds parents that “they know their kid the best.” Any drastic difference in behavior or temperament from what is normal for your young adult can be a sign that something more serious is happening.</p> <p>If your young adult talks about self-harm, suicide, or suicidal thoughts, do not avoid it. Try to find out if they mean they want to hurt themselves right now and, if so, seek immediate help by calling 9-1-1.</p> <p>If your young adult is drinking in excess or using other drugs to the point it is interfering with their ability to function normally, that’s also a time to seek professional help.</p> <p>For a small subset of the population that has psychotic disorders, young adulthood is often when symptoms start showing up. If your young adult is behaving erratically, having hallucinations, staying awake for extended periods of time, or sleeping for extend periods of time, seek professional help.</p> <p>For more help, try any of these resources:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>National Suicide Prevention Life Line—call  1-800-273-8255 or visit <a href="http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/">http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Crisis Text Line – Text “Connect” to 741741 or visit <a href="http://www.crisistextline.org/">www.crisistextline.org</a> </p> </li> <li> <p>Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Locator – call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or visit: <a href="https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/">https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/</a></p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
BODYES <p>Las transiciones suelen ser un gran desafío para muchas familias. Ya sea que tu hijo vaya a ingresar a la escuela intermedia, secundaria, universidad o a empezar a trabajar tiempo completo, todo cambio importante en su vida traerá emociones encontradas. Sentirás mucho entusiasmo en un momento y al minuto siguiente te invadirá el miedo o el estrés. Eso es completamente normal, para ti y para tus hijos. Cuando un joven termina el secundario o la universidad, el futuro puede parecer abrumador.</p> <p>Como padre, tu rol en la vida de tus hijos va cambiando a medida que crecen, pero mantener una línea abierta de comunicación puede beneficiar a todos. Uno de esos beneficios está relacionado con la salud mental. Hablar con tus hijos sobre este tema puede tomar muchas formas, pero si tienes unas preguntas en mente y mantienes un diálogo abierto, puedes ayudar a que estas transiciones se atraviesen con más fluidez.</p> <p><strong>¿Qué es “normal”?</strong></p> <p>La psicóloga clínica Dra. Bobbi Wegner suele recibir a padres que le acercan inquietudes sobre la transición de sus hijos cuando comienzan o terminan la universidad. Ella nos cuenta que muchos jóvenes atraviesan ciertas dificultades en la adaptación, y es completamente normal. Pero muchas veces, tanto los jóvenes como sus padres no esperan que se presenten estas emociones, entonces cuando llegan, vienen acompañadas de una gran preocupación.</p> <p>“La ansiedad y la depresión son el equivalente a un resfrío en cuanto a salud mental, pero las personas no suelen hablar de ello”, relata Wegner. “Como padres, podemos ayudar controlando la ansiedad, y sentirse triste o deprimido puede ser una parte ‘normal’ de la experiencia”.</p> <p>En los tiempos de transición se atraviesan dificultades “normales” como mayor ansiedad, depresión y dificultades en las relaciones. Es posible que a los jóvenes les resulte difícil hacer amigos nuevos en el trabajo o en la escuela, y comiencen a sentirse solos o aislados. Una mayor carga de trabajo y de responsabilidades puede contribuir al estrés. Aceptar que esos sentimientos son válidos puede ser de gran ayuda.</p> <p><strong>Prepárate</strong></p> <p>La directora ejecutiva del Departamento de Asesoramiento y Servicios de Psicología de la UCLA, la Dra. Nicole Presley Green, les aconseja a los padres que sean proactivos antes de que haya un problema. Saber cuáles son los recursos disponibles en el campus, como centros de asesoramiento para estudiantes, es un gran paso para estar preparados. También, asegúrate de que tu hijo tenga toda la información de su seguro médico para que esté preparado en caso de que necesite atención en algún momento.</p> <p>Estar preparado también implica mantener una línea abierta de comunicación entre tú y tu hijo. Esto no significa que debas llamarlo varias veces en el día, simplemente dejarle en claro que te puede llamar o contactar siempre que lo necesite. Ten presente que estuviste a su lado la mayor parte de su vida; tú sabes lo que es normal para él.</p> <p>“Es un momento de gran desafío para los padres. No saben cuánto darles de libertad y cuánto de cierto control”, comenta la Dra. Green. “Pero sí saben cuándo su hijo está alcanzando un punto donde necesita ayuda”.</p> <p><strong>Explorar: </strong><a href="/advice-tips/physical-health-and-young-adults-a-parent-s-guide?lang=es">La salud física y los adultos jóvenes: una guía para padres</a></p> <p><strong>Identifica las señales de alerta</strong></p> <p>Como padre, escuchar que es “normal” podría no ser de mucha ayuda cuando te preocupa si tu hijo está pudiendo manejarse en su nuevo mundo. Por suerte, existen pautas que te ayudarán a identificar si está pasando algo más grave.</p> <p>La Dra. Wegner recomienda prestar especial atención a cambios notorios en su conducta, en tres categorías a las que llama la “trilogía sagrada de la salud”: descanso, alimentación y energía. Cualquier cambio significativo en alguna de estas áreas (comer demasiado, comer muy poco, dormir demasiado, dormir muy poco, etc.) puede representar una señal de alerta y un momento para despertar tu curiosidad y preguntar más para saber qué está ocurriendo con tu hijo.</p> <p>La psicóloga Dra. Michele Borba recomienda tener unas preguntas en mente cuando estás hablando con tu hijo. Pregúntate:</p> <ul> <li> <p>¿Parece que se está adaptando?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Tiene amigos nuevos?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Se lo ve feliz?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Está haciendo actividades, como ir al gimnasio o al club?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Parece estar orgulloso de su trabajo o estudio? (Por ejemplo, “<strong>Nuestro</strong> equipo acaba de comenzar un proyecto nuevo” o “<strong>Mi</strong> escuela fue nombrada como una de las mejores del estado”). </p> </li> </ul> <p>Si puedes responder que “sí” a estas preguntas, es probable que tu hijo se esté adaptando bien aunque diga que está estresado o triste. Si notas que no está haciendo conexiones, o no está interesado en hacer amigos nuevos o en involucrarse, la Dra. Borba sostiene que se trata de una “señal de alerta” de futuros problemas.</p> <p><strong>Reconoce, empatiza y sé claro</strong></p> <p>Una forma de apoyar a tu hijo es reconocer sus sentimientos, empatizar con ellos y ser claro en las preguntas que le haces. Por lo general, cuando un joven se contacta con sus padres en un momento difícil es porque está buscando apoyo o un hombro donde pueda llorar. Desmerecer sus sentimientos o intentar resolver los problemas por ellos es una manera infalible de terminar la conversación por completo.</p> <p>Por ejemplo, si tu hijo se siente ansioso o deprimido, no desmerezcas esos sentimientos diciéndole: “no vale la pena que te estreses por eso” o “a todos les pasa lo mismo”. Del mismo modo, intentar solucionar el problema tampoco es la respuesta. Si tu hijo te dice que “no tiene amigos”, no saques a relucir todos los amigos que tuvo en el secundario o los nuevos compañeros de trabajo. Es posible que quiera decir que no tiene las mismas relaciones de amistad que solía tener, que es algo que puede hacerlo sentir aislado o solo.</p> <p>Por el contrario, sé claro en tus respuestas y devuélvele la pregunta o inquietud. La Dra. Wegner asegura que esta es una táctica frecuente de los terapeutas para validar la preocupación de un paciente, y habilitarlo a que encuentre la respuesta por sus propios medios. Puedes preguntar:</p> <ul> <li> <p>“Lamento saber que te sientes así. ¿A qué crees que se debe?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“Parece que no quieres ir a clase, ¿por qué te pasa eso?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Qué es lo que crees que está ocurriendo?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Qué has intentado para sentirte mejor?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿En qué puedo ayudarte?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“Noté X cosa, ¿cómo te sientes al respecto?”</p> </li> </ul> <p>Simplemente escuchándolo y permitiendo que tu hijo llegue a una conclusión por sí solo, lo estarás ayudando a comprender mejor sus sentimientos y a ocuparse de ellos.</p> <p><strong>Diles que está bien pedir ayuda</strong></p> <p>Pedir ayuda, especialmente si tiene que ver con la salud mental, suele estar estigmatizado en Estados Unidos. Pero no tiene por qué ser así. Para los estudiantes universitarios, la mayoría de los centros de asesoramiento son gratuitos y cualquiera los puede usar. Para los adultos jóvenes no inscritos en la universidad, <a href="http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/parity-guide.aspx">la mayoría de los planes de seguro médico</a> también ofrecen cobertura de salud mental. Por lo tanto, las consultas con un terapeuta o un psiquiatra suelen estar cubiertas de alguna forma. Y con respecto a ese estigma, la Dra. Wegner aclara que nadie debería sentir vergüenza por pedir ayuda si la necesita, aun cuando la situación no sea extrema.  </p> <p>“Muchas personas creen que es algo que solo deberías hacer si sufres una depresión clínica, y eso no es cierto”, agrega Wegner. “No tienes que establecer un compromiso, o ir para siempre. A veces, unas pocas sesiones pueden ayudarte”.</p> <p>La Dra. Green hace trabajos en el campus para disminuir el estigma asociado con recibir ayuda. En algunos casos, se les recomienda a los padres que incentiven a los estudiantes a buscar ayuda por cualquier medio que les parezca accesible. Por ejemplo, si la idea de hacer terapia los asusta, los padres les pueden sugerir hablar con su asesor de residencia en primer lugar.</p> <p><strong>Cuándo solicitar ayuda de un profesional</strong></p> <p>Por sobre todas las cosas, confía en tu instinto. La Dra. Green les recuerda a los padres que “ellos son los que mejor conocen a su hijo”. Cualquier diferencia notoria en la conducta o en el temperamento de tu hijo puede ser la señal de que está ocurriendo algo más serio.</p> <p>Si tu hijo habla de provocarse un daño, de suicidio o de pensamientos suicidas, no lo evites. Intenta averiguar si esto implica que quieren dañarse ahora mismo y, de ser así, pide ayuda de inmediato llamando al 9-1-1.</p> <p>Si tu hijo está bebiendo en exceso o consumiendo drogas al punto de que llegue a interferir en su comportamiento habitual, también es hora de pedir ayuda de un profesional.</p> <p>Para una pequeña parte de la población que sufre trastornos psicóticos, los síntomas comienzan a manifestarse en la juventud. Si tu hijo se está comportando de manera errática, sufre alucinaciones, permanece despierto por largos períodos, o duerme demasiado, busca ayuda de un profesional.</p> <p>Para recibir más ayuda, prueba alguno de estos recursos:</p> <ul> <li> <p>National Suicide Prevention Life Line—llama al  1-800-273-8255 o visita <a href="http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/">http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Crisis Text Line – Envía la palabra “Connect” al 741741 o visita <a href="http://www.crisistextline.org/">www.crisistextline.org</a> </p> </li> <li> <p>Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Locator – llama al 1-800-662-HELP (4357) o visita: <a href="https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/">https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/</a></p> </li> </ul> <p> </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
CMLABEL Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-06 18:33:04.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:30:24.217
DESCRIPTION Talking with your children about mental health can be beneficial for everyone.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Thought you'd be interested in this guide to talking with your children about mental health.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID FF5A9120-1B18-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-06 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Young Adults and Mental Health
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Young Adults and Mental Health
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, and an open dialogue, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.
TEASERES Las transiciones suelen ser un gran desafío para muchas familias.
TEASERIMAGE 4B5B8070-1952-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
TITLEES Adultos jóvenes y salud mental: una guía para padres
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Talking with your children about mental health can be beneficial for everyone. Learn more @educationnation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 F7935730-D79B-11E6-89870050569A5318
2 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318
3 496F0AF0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

Featured Experts