10th Grade

Academic Growth Chart

Benchmarks

10th Grade Academic




What You Can Do To Help Your Student

  • Math:

    Math Tips

    Access Online Resources

    For many parents, the biggest challenge they face helping their child with high school math is that the material is too difficult for them to easily help out. Familiarize yourself with the range of online resources, like Khan Academy and IXL, that provide your child with plenty of opportunities to review the concepts she is studying, take tutorials, and do practice problems. Even if you can’t solve the problems yourself, you can help steer your child toward helpful resources.

    Find a Math Mentor

    If your child is struggling with math and doesn’t understand what use it could ever be to her, it might help for her to have a mentor. This could be a friend or family member who uses math in their work, such as an accountant or an engineer or a programmer. Enlist this person to talk to your child to help to demystify math for her.

    Encourage Persistence

    Success in math has a lot to do with taking the time to understand a problem, thinking about different ways of solving it, and persevering if initial attempts to solve it fail. Encourage your child to stick it out with math that she finds challenging and to seek help if she needs it.

    Subscribe to Magazines That Feature Math

    Subscribe to magazines like Wired or Popular Science that cover subjects related to math in an entertaining and informative format.

    Watch Movies That Feature Math

    Plan a family movie-watching night around a film that features math, like A Beautiful Mind, Moneyball, or The Da Vinci Code.

    Highlight Real-World Examples of Math in the News

    Highlight examples of the real-world use of the math concepts that your child is learning when you’re watching the news together. Some are obvious, such as statistics and poll numbers that are often cited, and others are less so. Recent news stories that involved math included the complicated operation to right the capsized Costa Concordia cruise ship and Felix Baumgartner’s record-setting jump to earth from the stratosphere. Encourage your child do further research into stories that interest her and learn more about the math that was involved.

    Encourage Investing

    Consider giving your child a small sum of money to invest in the stock market. If that’s not an option, have her open a “fantasy” account and track its ups and downs as though she were investing real money.

    Ask Your Child to Teach You

    Ask your child to teach you the math she is studying. The best way to learn a concept is often to teach it to someone else, and verbalizing the ideas she is learning helps to clarify them for your child.

    Discuss Math-Related Career Options

    Encourage your child to explore ways in which math is used in different careers. How do doctors use math? Engineers? Bankers? What is she starting to think of as career goals? Help her explore, by researching online or talking to other adults, the role of math in the fields she is starting to consider.

    Highlight Math in Sports

    Sports provide an engaging way of exploring a host of mathematical concepts. Any hard-core baseball fan knows that the game can’t truly be appreciated without an understanding of some essential statistics, like a player’s batting average and runs batted in. Football is also full of statistics, such as the percentage of passes a quarterback completed. If your child is passionate about a sport, she’ll enjoy exploring it through math.

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    TEASER Your 10th grader’s work in reading and writing continues to build upon the progress she made in earlier grades, with still greater emphasis on critical analysis skills. The math curriculum for individual grades will vary from school to school, so please consult our subject-specific math benchmarks for details about what your child will be learning.
    TITLE 10th Grade Growth Chart
    TWEETTEXT Parent Toolkit: 10th Grade: http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=93839250-215F-11E3-9A520050569A5318
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  • English Language Arts:

    English Language Arts Tips

    Keep A Consistent Routine

    Now that your child is in high school, her academic success will have more bearing than ever on her future. As her social and extracurricular schedule gets busier, it’s important to keep her focused on her schoolwork and to make sure that she has an effective and consistent homework routine.

    Encourage Reading and Discussion

    Continue to encourage your child to read as much as possible. Make sure she’s staying on top of her assigned reading and also that she has enough down time for leisure reading. Consider choosing books or even long magazine articles to read together that you can then discuss and debate. Talk to her about things you’re reading and find interesting, and prompt her to do the same.

    Share Your Struggles

    Reading classic literature, such as Shakespeare, can be intimidating. As your child reads books read when you were her age, tell her about your struggles and success with the same texts. Just knowing that you also went through a similar experience could provide some needed encouragement for her.

    Use Technology to Build Vocabulary

    As your child progresses through high school, specialized vocabulary becomes increasingly important in many of her classes. If your child uses a smartphone or iPad, help her locate apps that focus on vocabulary development for specific subjects. There are many versions of digital flashcards that can help your child expand her vocabulary.

    Discuss The News

    Help your child become a more discerning consumer of news and information. Have an ongoing discussion with her about how you get your news and how you decide which sources to trust. Point out examples of misleading information you see, such as in ads, so that your child learns to be skeptical of some sources. Have her look for corrections in the local newspaper so that she sees examples of how news can be misreported. Bookmark some Internet sites that you consider reliable and that she can use as reference or information sources.

    Ask About School

    Depending on how moody your adolescent is, it could be more difficult than ever to have extended conversations with her. But continue to ask her regularly about what is going on at school, how she’s doing in class, what she’s struggling with, and which subjects she is enjoying.

    Discuss Career Possibilities

    As your child starts to think about future study concentrations and even career possibilities, use your discussion of the subjects that interest her to steer those conversations. Help her start thinking about the expertise that different careers require. What do lawyers need to study? What about doctors or engineers? Suggest family friends or relatives in various professions that she can talk to for advice and guidance.

    Suggest Making a Video

    Encourage your high schooler to make her own videos. She could make a public-service announcement for an issue she cares about, such as a concern about the environment, a particular product, or a community issue. She can start by brainstorming what she wants to talk about and doing some research. Next, she can learn how public service announcements are structured by watching some online. You can help by talking through with her what she notices about effective PSAs. Finally, she can write the script for her PSA, film it, and upload the finished video online!

    Encourage Longer Writing Projects

    The long days of summer are perfect for teen writers to take on bigger projects. Challenge your high schooler to uncover the stories of relatives, neighbors, or friends and to turn those stories into a published history project. For example, she might investigate who has lived in the neighborhood the longest, how the street has changed, or what happened when relatives moved to their current home. Start by helping your teen develop a list of questions. She can then interview these relatives and neighbors to find out some interesting facts and stories and write up the findings as a narrative, a poem, or even in question/answer format. Finally, she can illustrate or take photographs to make the history come alive!

    Include Writing in Your Family Traditions

    Help your child be a part of your family holiday traditions and include writing at the same time. Have her interview elderly family members or friends about their traditions in celebrating the holidays. She can then turn the information from these interviews into several kinds of writing, from photos with captions to illustrated stories to poems. These writings could turn into a special and much-valued gift to the family member or friend.

    Play Word Games

    Word games are a great way to get your children to see the magic of language. Playing with words can be the beginning of good writing.

    Here’s one idea to try with your high schooler: Together create 6-word memoirs that capture a moment in their lives. For example, if your teen has just finished her first day of school, she might write, “New universe, old self, what now?” If she’s dreading a hard test, you might write, “Killer test awaits. 3 more hours.”

    Encourage Reading About Famous Scientists and Inventors

    Encourage your child to read biographies of famous inventors, scientists, or computer experts, like Steve Jobs or Albert Einstein.

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    TEASER Your 10th grader’s work in reading and writing continues to build upon the progress she made in earlier grades, with still greater emphasis on critical analysis skills. The math curriculum for individual grades will vary from school to school, so please consult our subject-specific math benchmarks for details about what your child will be learning.
    TITLE 10th Grade Growth Chart
    TWEETTEXT Parent Toolkit: 10th Grade: http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=93839250-215F-11E3-9A520050569A5318
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There are many more additional resources that parents can consult when seeking support and guidance. Included here are some links that may be helpful.

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It can be overwhelming or intimidating for parents to attend these meetings. Try to remember that building a relationship in this face-to-face meeting is an opportunity.

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