Looking for High School?

Life After High School

How much, or how little, to be involved is just one of the many relationship changes you’ll have as your child leaves high school. Support their independence no matter where they’re going after high school.

51% of parents

51% of parents believe that schools are not preparing kids to enter the job market if they do not choose to go on to college

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>believe that schools are not preparing kids to enter the job market if they do not choose to go on to college</p>
BODYES <p>cree que las escuelas no preparan a los niños para incorporarse al mercado laboral si deciden no asistir a la universidad</p>
CATHTML [empty string]
CMLABEL 51% of parents
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-13 12:01:36.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-05-31 14:52:01.513
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES Estadística: El 51% de los padres cree que las escuelas no preparan a los niños para incorporarse al mercado laboral si deciden no asistir a la universidad
EXTERNALURL http://campaign.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=B32DD6D0-ACA3-11E4-B6B70050569A5318#Section_8
EXTERNALURLES http://escampaign.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A9321530-BC1E-11E4-99A40050569A5318
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES Estadística: El 51% de los padres cree que las escuelas no preparan a los niños para incorporarse al mercado laboral si deciden no asistir a la universidad
LABEL 51% of parents
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 784103A0-2062-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY BF5003D0-C7BC-11E6-8D5E0050569A4B6C
PUBLISHDATE [empty string]
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASERIMAGE A95BD0A1-2062-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
TITLE 51% of parents
TITLEES El 51% de los padres
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES Estadística: El 51% de los padres cree que las escuelas no preparan a los niños para incorporarse al mercado laboral
TYPENAME cmStatistic
VERSIONID [empty string]

Stat: 86%

86% of parents say children need more than a high school degree to achieve the American Dream

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>say children need more than a high school degree to achieve the American Dream</p>
BODYES <p>dice que los niños necesitan más que el título de la escuela secundaria para alcanzar el Sueño Americano</p>
CATHTML [empty string]
CMLABEL 86% of parents
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-13 11:57:08.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-05-17 11:19:58.437
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Did you know? 86% of parents say children need more than a high school degree to achieve the American Dream. Learn more!
EMAILTEXTES Estadística: 86% de los padres dice que los niños necesitan más que el título de la escuela secundaria para alcanzar el Sueño Americano
EXTERNALURL http://campaign.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=B32DD6D0-ACA3-11E4-B6B70050569A5318#Section_8
EXTERNALURLES http://escampaign.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=B32DD6D0-ACA3-11E4-B6B70050569A5318#Section_8
FACEBOOKTEXT Did you know? 86% of parents say children need more than a high school degree to achieve the American Dream. Learn more!
FACEBOOKTEXTES Estadística: 86% de los padres dice que los niños necesitan más que el título de la escuela secundaria para alcanzar el Sueño Americano
LABEL 86% of parents
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID D87C70C0-2061-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY BF5003D0-C7BC-11E6-8D5E0050569A4B6C
PUBLISHDATE [empty string]
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASERIMAGE E9474C90-2061-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
TITLE 86% of parents
TITLEES El 86% de los padres
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET STAT: 86% of parents say children need more than a high school degree to achieve the American Dream - @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES 86% de los padres dice que los niños necesitan más que la escuela secundaria para alcanzar el Sueño Americano
TYPENAME cmStatistic
VERSIONID [empty string]

46% of parents

46% of parents say their children will be successful in the future if they have a career they enjoy

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>say their children will be successful in the future if they have a career they enjoy</p>
BODYES <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-24d69242-fd6e-d4a9-342c-64e30f817988">dice que sus hijos serán más exitosos en el futuro si tienen una carrera que disfruten</span></p>
CATHTML [empty string]
CMLABEL 46% of parents
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-13 12:04:27.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-05-17 11:20:33.66
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Did you know? 46% of parents say their children will be successful in the future if they have a career they enjoy. Learn more!
EMAILTEXTES Estadística: 46% de los padres dice que sus hijos serán más exitosos en el futuro si tienen una carrera que disfruten
EXTERNALURL http://campaign.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=B32DD6D0-ACA3-11E4-B6B70050569A5318#Section_8
EXTERNALURLES http://escampaign.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A9321530-BC1E-11E4-99A40050569A5318#Section_8
FACEBOOKTEXT Did you know? 46% of parents say their children will be successful in the future if they have a career they enjoy. Learn more!
FACEBOOKTEXTES Estadística: 46% de los padres dice que sus hijos serán más exitosos en el futuro si tienen una carrera que disfruten
LABEL 46% of parents
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID DE611E40-2062-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY BF5003D0-C7BC-11E6-8D5E0050569A4B6C
PUBLISHDATE [empty string]
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASERIMAGE B8FDC761-2063-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
TITLE 46% of parents
TITLEES El 46% de los padres
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET STAT: 46% of parents say their children will be successful in the future if they have a career they enjoy. Learn more!
TWITTERTWEETES Estadística: 46% de los padres dice que sus hijos serán más exitosos en el futuro si tienen una carrera que disfruten
TYPENAME cmStatistic
VERSIONID [empty string]

Social and Emotional Development

Research shows that those with higher social-emotional skills have better attention skills and fewer learning problems, and are generally more successful in academic and workplace settings. Like math or English, these skills can be taught and grow over time.

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is knowing your emotions, strengths and challenges, and how your emotions affect your behavior and decisions.

Self-Management

Self-management is controlling emotions and the behaviors they spark in order to overcome challenges and pursue goals.

Social Awareness

Social awareness is understanding and respecting the perspectives of others, and applying this knowledge to social interactions with people from diverse backgrounds.

Relationships

The ability to interact meaningfully with others and to maintain healthy relationships with diverse individuals and groups contributes to overall success.

Responsible Decision-Making

Responsible decision-making is the ability to make choices that are good for you and for others. It is also taking into account your wishes and the wishes of others.

Recommended

parent child freshman goodbye

Pointers For Parents: Letting Your College Freshman Go

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1N4jBJC
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>In the months leading up to my first child going off to college, he really tested my patience.  I found myself envying those animals that ate their young.  I mentioned it to my mom in one of our many conversations and she imparted her wisdom:  “God has a way of letting you know when it’s time to cut the apron strings.”  Amen, sister.  Amen.</p> <p>On the day we took him to school, I didn’t sense any emotion from him.  I figured he was glad to get away from home and the “stupid” rules we had about behavior and curfews.  But as we pulled out of the driveway, I noticed that he couldn’t look back at the house.  Our/his beloved pup Kody was watching him from the front window, and I knew that he really <em>was</em> emotional about leaving home.  The tough guy routine was just a façade that masked how he was really feeling.</p> <p>Once at the college, I did all the typical “mom” things:  I made his bed, put things away in orderly fashion, double-checked his supplies, and tried to be upbeat.  The time came for us to leave, and the tears came as I walked to the car.  As my husband and I got into our respective vehicles, we both looked back at my son’s dorm.  There he was, standing in the porch area chatting up a couple of girls.  My husband and I looked at each other.  My son was going to be fine.</p> <p>Over the next few days, I couldn’t help but wonder how he was doing.  When he didn’t call the first night, I was relieved; he must be doing ok.  When he didn’t call the next day, I was happy; he made it one full day…that was good.  When he didn’t call the second day, I was satisfied; he must be busy getting ready for the first day of classes.  When he didn’t call the third day, I kept telling myself that it was good; he must be having a good time.  When the fourth day rolled around with no call, I told my husband that it was clear my son was having WAY too much fun and I was going to call him.  My husband stopped me.  I finally received a call on day 5.  He was happy, seemed well adjusted, had made friends, and was ready for classes.  I never told him I had been on the verge of driving up there and chewing him out. </p> <p>Letting go of our children is a tough thing to do.  But it’s a necessary step that every parent must take.  For us, it’s a leap of faith that all the lessons we’ve taught them will help them make good decisions, problem-solve well, and develop responsible independence.  If we hover, and continue to make decisions for them, and intervene every time there’s a problem, we’re admitting that we did a lousy job of parenting AND we’re telling our kids that we don’t believe in them enough to be able to handle themselves and their newfound independence.  As one parent to another, here’s how I made it through. Maybe it will help you too.</p> <p>Do NOT Solve Their Problems</p> <p>My first piece of advice for parents is:  <strong>when they call (and they will) and tell you that they have a problem, ask the following:  “What are you going to do about it?” </strong>That simple question sends the message that you believe in your child’s ability to be mature enough to find a good solution to the dilemma at hand.  And let’s face it, if they aren’t mature enough to do that, they shouldn’t be away at school.  As they consider their options for solving the dilemma, you can listen and ask guiding questions: “If you do that, do you see any negative consequences of that solution?  What are the pros/cons of that solution?  Which solution do you think will have the best outcome for you?”  The main idea here is this:  do NOT solve the problem for them.  They need to believe (and so do you) that they have the ability to fix things themselves.</p> <p>RELATED:<a style="font-size: 1em;" href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=86585700-41C4-11E5-BDFB0050569A5318" target="_86585700-41C4-11E5-BDFB0050569A5318">The Undeniable Link between Rescuing and Responsibility – What Parents Need to Know This School Year</a></p> <p>Do Not Call The School</p> <p>Second piece of advice:  <strong>unless you are calling about the tuition bill, do NOT call the college or any professors.  </strong>Again, if there are issues with a class or with a dorm or with a roommate, those are for your child to solve.  How is it going to look if mommy and daddy swoop in?  It’s not only humiliating, but it also reduces your college freshman to baby level.  Plus, according to <a href="http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html">FERPA</a>, the college can’t talk to you because your child is of age and is now legally responsible for his/her educational records and business.  And that also means you won’t get a copy of grades unless your child specifies that you should receive them.  I’m not sure that it’s quite fair that the college contacted me about the tuition bill but I couldn’t get a copy of my child’s grades…somehow that didn’t seem quite right.  But that’s the way it is.  To this day, I have no idea what my son’s grades or grade point average was.  But he ended up ok…he’s employed and he doesn’t ask me for money….or to come back home.</p> <p>Give Them Their Space</p> <p>Third piece of advice:  <strong>don’t be a frequent visitor or insist that your child come home often.</strong>  It’s critical that kids find their place on their college campus.  They need to create a life there…a life that doesn’t include mom and dad.  I’ll never forget the day that my son told me that he didn’t want my husband and me just stopping in without calling.  I wanted to burst out laughing.  This kid must have thought I had no life.  I assured him (very seriously) that I wouldn’t ever do that.  And I didn’t.  Guess what happened?  He called ME and asked if we could come up to visit.  I soon learned that meant he was out of food or needed something; it all made me chuckle.  Honestly, I loved going to visit when he asked, and my intent was to leave him with full cupboards and having a few extra things.  I remember what that meant to me as a college freshman, and it still holds true.  He appreciated me more for not showing up continually, and he was very grateful for anything that I gave him.  It was good for both of us. </p> <p>Let Them Find Their Place</p> <p>Fourth piece of advice:  <strong>allow your kids to find their own place within the social structure of college.</strong>  Some parents live vicariously through their children and their experiences.  They pressure them with expectations of getting into a specific sorority/fraternity, of making a certain team, of going on a semester abroad, of being in the “right” dorm and making the “right” friends, etc.  I’ve seen too many parents agonize over getting letters of recommendation for a sorority or fraternity; some are more concerned about those letters than letters of recommendation that go along with a college application!  Kids need to be able to be their own person, to make their own choices about activities, and know that whatever they choose they will still have their parents’ support.  Please don’t put that kind of pressure on your kids. </p> <p>Enforce Your Rules At Home</p> <p>Fifth piece of advice:  <strong>when they come home, get ready for extreme schedule disruption.</strong> The daily schedule of college kids is crazy.  They sleep till noon, make plans to go out when most parents are going to bed, come in during the wee hours of the morning, and continue the cycle.  But remember, this is your home.  They don’t get to come back and behave like someone holding all of you captive.  You can still (and should) enforce your family rules and expectations.  Coming home doesn’t mean that mom and dad will become doormats and the house will be a motel, laundry and diner.  Make your expectations clear and stick to them.  If they don’t like them, too bad.  Maybe they’ll stay at school over the summer.  Maybe they won’t end up living on your couch after graduation. </p> <p>RELATED:<a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=0F8ACA20-2AFB-11E5-9D3C0050569A5318"> 5 Parenting Styles That Cause Entitlement in Kids — And How to Change Them</a></p> <p>Demand Respect</p> <p>Sixth piece of advice:  <strong>don’t change who you are and what you value to suit them.</strong>  Going to college doesn’t mean that they become kings and queens when they return home.  You do not become their “beck and call” parents when they want/need something.  Many parents are helping their children financially during their years in college.  That’s quite a sacrifice.  There’s no way you should accept anything but respect and appreciation from them.  Demanding or expecting that doesn’t mean you are miserable or pathetic.  Would they treat an employer that way??</p> <p>Do Not Cave</p> <p>Here’s a true story:  when the time came for my son’s graduation, I began talking with him about having a graduation party.  Not only is this party a time for family and friends to get together to celebrate, but it’s also a time when the person of honor receives gifts that can help launch him or her.  It’s like a rite of passage.  My son told me that he wanted a keg party.  I told him what my husband and I were prepared to buy with respect to alcohol, and that didn’t suit him.  His response:  “No keg, no party.”  So I took him at his word.  And I stuck to my guns and my values.  I went all over town and cancelled every party platter, returned decorations, and told relatives there would be no party.  As graduation day approached, my son asked me about the party.  I gave him a surprised look and said, “I cancelled the party.  You said no keg, no party, and I wasn’t going to get a keg, so I took you at your word and cancelled everything.”  The look on his face was priceless.  He was caught.  He laid down that demand, I countered with my value, and I stuck to my guns.  And all the while, my daughter was watching and learning.  We had no graduation party for my son.  When my daughter was graduating from college, I asked her what she wanted for her party, and she said, “Whatever you want, mom.”  She had a lovely family dinner at a favorite restaurant, was thrilled to be honored and, I suspect, felt very smug looking at her brother that evening as she opened her many gifts.</p> <p>I’ve told that story to my private practice clients, and they are typically incredulous.  They can’t believe that I didn’t cave.  But think about it…we spend our parenting lives preparing to launch our kids.  We want them to have the skills to be successful when they go out into the world on their own.  What would an employer say to an employee who counters an offer with a ridiculous demand?  How do we want them treating their spouse and their children?  We set the example, folks.  The last time I looked, the books on parenting did not say we were expected to wear “Welcome” mats on our backs.</p> <p>Launching your children into college is a remarkable achievement for both kids and parents.  There will always be a role for you in your child’s life.  You will be his/her biggest cheerleader and wisest sounding board.  It’s time to let them go and explore all that life has to offer.  And when they come home and tell you about all the crazy, wonderful things that they have experienced, you can take pride in a job well done. </p>
BODYES <p>Durante los meses previos a que ingresara en la universidad, mi primer hijo realmente puso a prueba mi paciencia. Me llevó a envidiar a esos animales que comen a sus crías. Se lo mencioné a mi mamá en una de nuestras tantas conversaciones, y me transmitió su sabiduría: “Dios encontrará la forma de decirte cuándo es el momento indicado de cortar ciertos lazos”. Amén, hermana. Amén.</p> <p>El día que lo acompañamos a la universidad, no percibí ninguna emoción en él. Pienso que estaba contento de irse de casa y de librarse de las reglas “estúpidas” de conducta y horarios. Pero cuando salíamos con el auto, noté que no miraba hacia la casa. Nuestra/su adorada mascota Kody lo miraba desde la ventana, y me di cuenta de que sí <em>estaba</em> conmovido por irse de casa. La escena de hombre fuerte era solo una fachada que escondía lo que en verdad estaba sintiendo. </p> <p>En cuanto llegamos a la universidad, hice todas las cosas típicas de una “mamá”: tendí su cama, acomodé sus cosas, revisé que no le faltara nada e intenté estar alegre. Llegó el momento de irnos, y las lágrimas brotaron cuando me acercaba al auto. Mientras mi esposo y yo subíamos a nuestros vehículos, ambos miramos hacia la habitación de nuestro hijo. Allí estaba, parado en el porche hablando con un par de muchachas. Mi esposo y yo nos miramos. Mi hijo iba a estar bien. </p> <p>En los días posteriores, no pude evitar preguntarme cómo le estaría yendo. Me sentí aliviada cuando noté que no había llamado la primera noche; debe estar bien. Cuando la escena se repitió al día siguiente, me sentí feliz; pasó todo un día…eso era muy bueno. Al ver que tampoco llamó el segundo día, me sentí satisfecha; debe estar ocupado preparándose para el primer día de clases. Tampoco hubo llamada el tercer día, y me seguí diciendo que todo estaba bien; debe estar pasándola bien. Cuando transcurrió el cuarto día sin llamadas, le dije a mi esposo que era evidente que nuestro hijo se estaba DIVIRTIENDO demasiado y que iba a llamarlo. Mi esposo me detuvo. Finalmente, la llamada llegó el día 5. Se lo escuchaba feliz, parecía que se estaba adaptando, había hecho amigos y estaba listo para comenzar las clases. Nunca le dije que estuve a punto de ir hasta allí y recriminarle unas cuantas cosas. </p> <p>Separarnos de nuestros hijos no es nada fácil. Pero es un paso indispensable que todos los padres debemos dar. Para nosotros, es un voto de confianza en el que esperamos que todas las lecciones enseñadas lo ayuden a tomar buenas decisiones, a resolver problemas y a desarrollar una independencia responsable. Si permanecemos alrededor, y seguimos tomando decisiones por él e interviniendo cada vez que surge un problema, estamos reconociendo que no hicimos un buen trabajo como padres Y les estamos diciendo a nuestros hijos que no confiamos lo suficiente en ellos como para que se arreglen por sí solos y se hagan cargo de su flamante independencia. De padre a padre, así es como yo lo atravesé. Quizá puede ayudarte.</p> <p>NO resuelvas sus problemas </p> <p>Mi primer consejo para los padres es este: <strong>cuando te llamen (lo harán) y te digan que tienen un problema, pregúntales lo siguiente: “¿Qué vas a hacer al respecto?”</strong>. Esa simple pregunta transmite que crees en la capacidad de tu hijo para encontrar una solución acertada al problema que lo aqueja. Y hay que admitirlo, si no tienen la madurez suficiente, no deberían estar en la universidad. Mientras consideran sus opciones para resolver el problema, tú puedes escuchar y hacer preguntas que los oriente: “Si haces eso, ¿crees que esa solución tendrá alguna consecuencia negativa? ¿Cuáles son los pros y los contras de esa solución? ¿Cuál crees que será la solución con mejores resultados para ti?”. La idea principal aquí es: NO resuelvas el problema por ellos. Necesitan creer (y tú también) que tienen la capacidad suficiente para solucionar sus problemas.</p> <p>No llames a la escuela </p> <p>Segundo consejo: <strong>a menos que estés llamando por el pago de la matrícula, NO llames a la universidad ni a los profesores.</strong> Otra vez, si hay algún problema con una clase o con la habitación o con un compañero de habitación, es tu hijo quien debe resolverlo. ¿Cómo se verían si mami o papi aparecen en escena? No solo es humillante, sino que también tu estudiante de primer año de la universidad queda como un bebé. Además, de acuerdo con <a href="http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html">FERPA</a>, la universidad no hablará contigo porque tu hijo ya es mayor de edad y ahora es legalmente responsable por su historial y temas académicos. Y eso significa que no recibirás una copia de sus calificaciones a menos que tu hijo especifique que deberías recibirla. No sé si es del todo justo que la universidad me contacte por el pago de la matrícula, pero no lo haga para enviarme una copia de las calificaciones de mi hijo…de algún modo eso no parece muy correcto. Pero así es cómo funciona. Al día de hoy, no tengo idea cuáles fueron las calificaciones o los promedios de mi hijo. Pero todo terminó bien…tiene trabajo y no me pide dinero…ni quiere volver a casa.</p> <p>Dale su espacio</p> <p>Tercer consejo: <strong>no lo visites con frecuencia ni le insistas para que vaya seguido a casa.</strong> Es fundamental que los jóvenes encuentren su lugar en el campus. Necesitan crear una vida allí…una vida que no incluya ni a mamá ni a papá. Nunca me voy a olvidar del día en el que mi hijo me dijo que no quería que mi esposo y yo fuéramos sin llamar antes. Me dieron muchas ganas de reír. Debe haber pensado que yo no tenía vida. Le aseguré (en serio) que jamás haría eso. Y no lo hice. Adivinen qué pasó. ME llamó y me preguntó si podía venir a visitarnos. Luego descubrí que se había quedado sin comida o que necesitaba algo; me parecía muy gracioso. Honestamente, me encantaba ir a visitarlo cuando me lo pedía, quería llenar sus alacenas y que no le faltara nada. Me acuerdo de lo que significaba para mí cuando yo estudiaba, y sigue siendo así. Me valoraba más por no visitarlo continuamente, y estaba muy agradecido por cualquier cosa que le llevara. Era bueno para ambos.</p> <p>Permítele encontrar su lugar</p> <p>Cuarto consejo: <strong>deja que tu hijo encuentre su propio lugar dentro de la estructura social de la universidad</strong>. Algunos padres viven indirectamente a través de sus hijos y de sus experiencias. Los presionan para que ingresen en determinada hermandad o fraternidad, para que formen parte de algún equipo, para que pasen un semestre en el exterior, para que estén en la habitación “correcta” y hagan los amigos “correctos”, etc. He visto infinidad de padres desesperarse por recibir cartas de recomendación para una hermandad o fraternidad; algunos se preocupan más por esas cartas que por las de una solicitud de ingreso a una determinada universidad. Los hijos deben poder ser sujetos individuales, tomar sus propias decisiones sobre las actividades que quieren hacer, y saber que sin importar la decisión que tomen recibirán el apoyo de sus padres. Por favor, no presiones de esa forma a tus hijos.</p> <p>Haz cumplir tus reglas en la casa</p> <p>Quinto consejo: <strong>cuando vayan a tu casa, prepárate para vivir un cambio extremo de horarios</strong>. Los horarios en el día a día de un estudiante universitario son una locura. Duermen hasta el mediodía, hacen planes para salir cuando la mayoría de los padres se acuestan, vuelven a altas horas de la madrugada y así continúan el ciclo. Así que no olvides que es tu casa. No tienen por qué regresar y tener a todos cautivos. Puedes (y debes) hacer cumplir tus reglas. Volver a casa no significa que mamá y papá se convertirán en felpudos y que la casa será un lugar para dormir, lavar ropa y comer. Deja en claro tus expectativas y no cedas. Si no están de acuerdo, mala suerte. Quizá prefieran quedarse en la universidad durante el verano. Quizá no terminarán durmiendo en tu sofá después de graduarse.</p> <p>Exige respeto</p> <p>Sexto consejo: <strong>no cambies quién eres y qué valoras para adaptarte a ellos</strong>. Que vayan a la universidad no los convierte en reyes o reinas cuando vuelven a casa. No estés a su entera disposición cada vez que quieran/necesiten algo. Muchos padres les dan a sus hijos una ayuda financiera durante la universidad. Eso ya es bastante sacrificio. Todo lo que debes recibir es respeto y agradecimiento de su parte. Exigir o esperar eso no quiere decir que seas ingrato o patético. ¿Así tratarían a un empleador?</p> <p>No cedas</p> <p>Les cuento una historia real: cuando se acercaba la graduación de mi hijo, empecé a hablarle para organizar una fiesta de graduación. Una fiesta como esta no solo es un buen momento para que se reúnan familiares y amigos, sino también un momento para que la persona homenajeada reciba regalos que pueden ser de gran ayuda. Es como un ritual de transición. Mi hijo me dijo que quería una fiesta con un barril de cerveza. Le conté lo que mi esposo y yo íbamos a comprar de alcohol y no le agradó. Su respuesta fue: “Si no hay un barril de cerveza, no hay fiesta”. Así que le hice caso. Y me mantuve en mi posición. Recorrí toda la ciudad cancelando el servicio de vajilla, devolviendo la decoración y diciéndoles a los familiares que no habría fiesta. A medida que se acercaba el día de la graduación, mi hijo me preguntó por la fiesta. Lo miré sorprendida y le respondí: “La cancelé. Dijiste que sin un barril de cerveza, no habría fiesta, y yo no iba a comprar un barril así que te hice caso y cancelé todo”. La mirada que puso era impagable. Estaba atrapado. Él hizo un pedido, yo le hice mi contraoferta y me mantuve firme. Y mientras tanto, mi hija miraba y aprendía. Mi hijo no tuvo una fiesta de graduación. Cuando llegó el turno de mi hija, le pregunté qué quería para su fiesta, y me respondió: “Lo que tú quieras, mamá”. Ella tuvo una hermosa cena familiar en su restaurante favorito, estaba conmovida por ser homenajeada y, creo, que se sentía una ganadora mirando a su hermano mientras abría los innumerables regalos.</p> <p>Les he contado esta historia a mis clientes, y no lo creen. No pueden entender cómo no cedí. Pero piénsalo por un instante…nos pasamos toda la vida como padres preparándonos para que nuestros hijos se independicen. Queremos que tengan las habilidades necesarias para triunfar cuando salgan al mundo. ¿Qué le diría un empleador a su empleado que contrarresta una oferta con una exigencia ridícula? ¿Cómo queremos que traten a su pareja y a sus hijos? Nosotros ponemos el ejemplo, amigos. Hasta donde yo sé, los libros sobre crianza no recomiendan usar un felpudo que diga “Bienvenido” en nuestras espaldas. </p> <p>El ingreso de los hijos en la universidad es un logro notable tanto para los hijos como para los padres. Siempre tendrás un rol en la vida de tu hijo. Serás su fan número uno y su consejero más valioso. Es momento de dejarlos ir y permitirles explorar todo lo que la vida tiene para ofrecerles. Y cuando vuelvan a casa y te empiecen a contar todas las experiencias alocadas y maravillosas que vivieron, puedes sentirte orgulloso de haber hecho un buen trabajo. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,2B6C3F55-5056-9A4B-6C81272D53A7541E,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:51.87
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:24:52.517
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Pointers For Parents: Letting Your College Freshman Go
LASTUPDATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 9B768510-4D01-11E5-8F900050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B6C3F55-5056-9A4B-6C81272D53A7541E
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2015-08-31 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Letting go of our children is a tough thing to do. But it’s a necessary step that every parent must take. For us, it’s a leap of faith that all the lessons we’ve taught them will help them make good decisions, problem-solve well, and develop responsible independence.
TEASERES Durante los meses previos a que ingresara en la universidad, mi primer hijo realmente puso a prueba mi paciencia.
TEASERIMAGE 744F3310-245F-11E7-AA190050569A4B6C
TITLE Pointers For Parents: Letting Your College Freshman Go
TITLEES Consejos para padres: cuando los hijos se van a la universidad
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 42715070-2A8B-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Parents and Teen Boy

Guiding Our Children Through School Transitions: Off To College

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1pazoJG
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Where did the last four years go? I think that’s the question that every parent of a high school senior asks him/herself at the beginning of that last school year. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself looking forward to having your child move out and on to college by the end of the school year. You’re not a bad parent, you’re a real parent. It’s all part of the life cycle and the struggle between control and independence.</p> <p>The transition to post-secondary really kicks into high gear during junior year. Most high school counselors will begin holding parent and student information meetings that are filled with tips for choosing a college, career or other post-secondary option. You’ll hear about the SAT and the ACT, and other types of assessments that are linked to college admission. I encourage you to attend any and all meetings so you remain informed. If your child is typical, s/he will not think about telling you anything about the transition process until and unless there’s a deadline to meet, and they are very late. At these types of meetings, you’ll get timelines and good tips for staying on track and ahead of the game for post-secondary choices.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=67061440-9D6B-11E3-857E0050569A5318">RELATED: See what your child will be learning this year in school.</a></p> <h4>Junior Year</h4> <p><strong>• What Option to Choose.</strong> I’ve seen so many kids feel pressured into choosing a career, a major, and/or a college based upon the wishes of their parents. This typically ends badly for everyone. The best thing you can do is honor your child’s talents and interests by listening to his/her plans and by having an open dialogue about the pros and cons of the choices. My mom wanted me to be a nurse. What she failed to realize was that: 1) I was terrible at science because I wasn’t interested in the subject; 2) whenever I saw someone barf, I added to it. Not a good characteristic for a nurse. Thank goodness she didn’t press me to follow her dream; she honored mine. I entered the field of education and, after 40+ years, I can still say that I love what I do. That’s not too shabby. So go ahead and offer guidance, but avoid making the decision for your child.</p> <p><strong>• Assessments</strong> If your child is planning to attend a 4 year college, they must take either the ACT or SAT. They are very different tests. I used to live on the East Coast where everyone took the SAT. Now I live in the Midwest and everyone takes the ACT. Talk to your child's school counselor about which test is best for your child. You also want to check the entrance requirements of any colleges your child may be interested in; they will tell you what tests they require for entrance. Junior year is typically when kids start taking these tests. Some will wait until June, when they have completed the bulk of their coursework. Others may take tests earlier in their junior year because they’ve had the coursework that typically helps them achieve well. Check with your school counselor on what your child should take and when. Registering is done online, so it’s pretty easy to get signed up.</p> <p><strong>• College Visits.</strong> I strongly encourage my students to start their college visits mid-way through their junior year. Some will use spring break for visits, and others wait until summer. The visit is almost a mystical experience. The minute you get out of the car, you’ll know if it’s a good fit for your child. S/he will let you know. On our first college visit, my daughter asked me, “how much farther?” I should have turned the car around and gone back home right then. The entire visit was a bust as she followed the tour guide with disinterest. When we made the visit to her eventual choice, we pulled into the parking place and she said, “this is it.” And it was.</p> <p>My son did an interesting thing on our first visit. He wouldn’t walk with me or the tour group. I finally asked him why he wasn’t walking with me. He looked at me and said, “Mom, I have to see how I fit into this school, how it feels to be a student here. I can’t do that if I’m walking with my mom.” I thought that was pretty smart. College visits are critical because kids live there. It’s not just about the academics. They have to have a life, too. Checking out the dorms, the cafeterias, the fitness facilities, and the areas for fun is very important. Sure kids can learn there, but can they live there? Visit!</p> <h4>Senior Year</h4> <p><strong>• Have “The Talk”.</strong> Not every college is affordable for families, so it’s important to talk to your child about the expense. Be clear about what you can and cannot afford. Talk with the school counselor about financial aid possibilities and scholarships. But, bottom line, your child has to choose a place you can afford. They’ll still get a great education, even if they don’t attend their dream school. There’s always grad school for that.</p> <p><strong>• Applying.</strong> The fall will be a flurry of completing applications, writing college essays, filling out financial aid paperwork, and all within deadlines. Can I just make a request here? PLEASE let your kids fill out their own applications, etc. They need to make the choices of where to apply, what major to consider, and they need to get the paperwork turned in on time. If you do it for them, it belongs to you. And if the choice turns out badly, it’s your fault. They have to take the responsibility upon themselves. You’re not going to be there next year when they’re pulling an all-nighter because they left that paper until the last minute. That’s a great learning experience. It typically only takes one screw-up, and it doesn’t happen again. So let them do it on their own. Feel free to contact the school counselor about deadlines and timelines. You can leave notes on the fridge reminding them when applications are due, but don’t do it for them. It’ll kill you, I’ll be honest. But the responsibility is theirs, not yours. If you do it for them, you’re enabling them, and they’ll perpetuate that behavior. Resist the temptation to rescue.</p> <p><strong>• Senioritis.</strong> This affliction can hit in the fall or in the spring of the senior year. It’s that feeling that “I’m done (or almost done)” and “I’m invincible.” However, I’ve seen far too many seniors get themselves into such a bad situation that they almost don’t graduate. They don’t bother doing work, they don’t study; all they want to do is relax and play. That’s a bad combination. Students are accepted at college based upon the successful completion of the school year. Many students read “you are admitted,” and don’t bother to read the fine print. I’ve had the very unfortunate situation of having to sit with a family at the end of the school year, reviewing a letter from the college that the student had been admitted to, only to read that the college had changed its mind based upon the senior year antics of the student. As parents, it’s so important to maintain academics as a priority right up until graduation. “Taking a break” also means taking a break from skill-building and skill practice, and that doesn’t bode well for college in the fall. It’s not going to be easy, but remain resolute and stand your ground.</p> <p><strong>• Leaving Home.</strong> And that brings us to that day when you pack up your car and you head down the road to drop your baby off at college. I’m guessing it may be a day of mixed feelings. On the one hand, it will be very nostalgic as you remember the first day of kindergarten and you wonder where the time went. On the other hand, you may be counting the seconds until you can drive away and leave him/her behind. My son really flexed his “I’m independent” muscle the summer after senior year. It was awful. He thought I was an idiot and was very disrespectful. I remember talking to my mom about it and telling her that I couldn’t wait for him to go to college. She gave me her great insight, as always: “God has a way of telling you when to cut the apron strings.”</p> <p>I sometimes wonder if that last summer was his way of hiding his anxiety and the fact that he may have been a bit scared of the future. He behaved like a swashbuckler who cared for no one other than himself. But, as we pulled out of the driveway that day, I couldn’t help but notice that he could not bring himself to look at the house where his beloved pup was in the window watching him drive away. He had to be solid and brave. He had to be in order to have the courage to make this leap. He was ready to step into this brave new world. iIt was time for me to let him go and figure it all out for himself.</p> <p>Parents worry about their kids no matter what their age. Both of mine are in their 30s and I still worry like crazy. They have blessed me with five beautiful grandchildren, and I now have the best job in the world. I’m “Grammy.” I don’t know if I did everything right, but as I watch my children and realize the wonderful parenting they do, I feel proud. It’s a journey, for sure, and there are some lessons learned that I’d gladly have traded. But those stories are for other blogs. Stay tuned…</p> <p><em>This piece is part of a series examining how parents can help children through school transitions. Check out some of the other posts about <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=70BF09F0-135A-11E4-98390050569A5318">starting elementary school</a>, <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=11D8DA50-1360-11E4-98390050569A5318">transitioning to middle school</a> and <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=DD2D6520-1362-11E4-98390050569A5318">beginning high school</a>.</em></p>
BODYES <p>¿Adónde se fueron los últimos cuatro años? Creo que todos los padres se hacen esta pregunta cuando comienza el último año de la secundaria. No te sorprendas si te descubres deseando con ansias que tu hijo se mude e ingrese a la universidad hacia fines del año escolar. No eres un mal padre, eres humano. Todo es parte del ciclo de la vida y de la lucha entre el control y la independencia. </p> <p>La transición a la etapa del postsecundario es todo un proceso que se inicia en el penúltimo año. La mayoría de los consejeros estudiantiles comienzan a tener reuniones informativas con padres y estudiantes para darles consejos a la hora de elegir una universidad, una carrera u otra opción al terminar la escuela. Escucharás palabras como “SAT” y “ACT”, y otro tipo de evaluaciones, que están asociadas con el ingreso a una universidad. Te recomiendo que asistas a todas las reuniones posibles para mantenerte informado. Si tu hijo no escapa del comportamiento habitual, no te contará nada sobre el proceso de transición a menos que haya alguna fecha límite que cumplir, y esté muy retrasado. En estas reuniones recibirás cronogramas y buenos consejos que te mantendrán alerta y al tanto de las opciones para el postsecundario. </p> <p><strong>Último año:</strong><strong> </strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Qué opción elegir.</strong> He visto a tantos niños presionados para elegir una carrera y/o una universidad basándose en los deseos de sus padres. Esto suele terminar mal para todos. Lo mejor que puedes hacer es respetar las habilidades y los intereses de tu hijo escuchando sus planes y teniendo un diálogo abierto sobre los pros y los contras de sus elecciones. Mi mamá quería que yo fuera enfermera. Parece que no se daba cuenta de que: 1) era muy mala en ciencia porque no me interesaba el área; 2) cada vez que veía vomitar a alguien, me sumaba. Una característica no muy buena para una enfermera. Por suerte, no me presionó para que siguiera su sueño; respetó el mío. Ingresé en el área de la educación y después de más de 40 años aún puedo decir que amo lo que hago. No está nada mal. Así que aconséjalo, pero no tomes decisiones por tu hijo. </li> <li><strong>Evaluaciones. </strong>Si tu hijo está pensando en asistir a una universidad por 4 años, deberá rendir el ACT o SAT. Son exámenes muy diferentes entre sí. Yo vivía en la costa este donde todos rendían el SAT. Ahora vivo en la región del centro-norte y todos rinden el ACT. Habla con el consejero estudiantil de tu hijo y pregúntale cuál es el mejor examen para él. También deberás verificar los requisitos de ingreso de las universidades en las que tu hijo está interesado; ellos te dirán qué evaluaciones se requieren para el ingreso. Por lo general, en el penúltimo año comienzan a rendir estos exámenes. Algunos esperan hasta junio, cuando ya completaron gran parte del curso. Otros los rinden antes porque ya asistieron a clases que los ayudan a aprobarlo. Consulta con el asesor qué examen debería rendir tu hijo y cuándo. La inscripción puede hacerse en línea así que el proceso es muy sencillo.</li> <li><strong>Visitas a la universidad.</strong> Siempre les recomiendo a mis estudiantes que comiencen a visitar universidades hacia la mitad del penúltimo año. Algunos lo hacen en el receso de primavera, y otros esperan hasta el verano. La visita es casi una experiencia mística. Al minuto que te bajas del auto, sabrás si es adecuada para tu hijo. Él te lo dirá. En nuestra primera visita a la universidad, mi hija me preguntó: “¿cuánto falta para llegar?”. En ese preciso instante, debería haber dado la vuelta y regresado a casa. Toda la visita resultó un fiasco porque seguía el recorrido con total desinterés. Cuando visitamos la que eventualmente eligió, al llegar al estacionamiento dijo: “es aquí”. Y así fue.</li> </ul> <p>Mi hijo hizo algo interesante en la primera visita. No caminó junto a mí o al grupo de la visita. Luego le pregunté por qué. Me miró y me dijo: “Mamá, tengo que ver cómo me siento en esta escuela, cómo es ser un estudiante aquí. No puedo hacerlo si estoy caminando junto a mi mamá”. Me pareció muy inteligente. Las visitas a las universidades son fundamentales porque los jóvenes viven allí. No solo se trata de lo académico. También tendrán que tener una vida allí. Conocer las habitaciones, las cafeterías, los gimnasios y las áreas de recreación es muy importante. Seguramente cualquier joven podría estudiar allí, pero ¿podrá vivir en ese lugar? ¡Visítalo!</p> <p><strong>Penúltimo año:</strong><strong> </strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Ten “esa charla”.</strong> No todas las universidades son asequibles para las familias, por eso es importante que hables de los gastos con tu hijo. Sé claro acerca de lo que puedes y no puedes afrontar. Habla con el consejero estudiantil sobre las posibilidades de ayuda financiera y becas. Pero ten presente que es importante que tu hijo elija un lugar que puedas costear. Recibirán una excelente educación aunque no asistan a la escuela de sus sueños. Para eso siempre están las escuelas para graduados.</li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>Solicitudes</strong>. El otoño llegará con un aluvión de solicitudes, ensayos académicos, papelerío de ayuda financiera, y todo en determinadas fechas. ¿Puedo sugerirte algo? POR FAVOR, pídele a tu hijo que complete sus propias solicitudes, etc. Debe elegir dónde presentarse, qué carreras considerar y completar todo el papelerío en tiempo y forma. Si lo haces por él, te pertenece a ti. Y si algo resulta mal, será tu culpa. Tiene que asumir su responsabilidad. El próximo año no estarás allí cuando tenga que pasar toda la noche despierto porque dejó ese trabajo para último momento. Es un gran aprendizaje. Por lo general, suelen equivocarse una vez, y luego no repiten el mismo error. Deja que lo haga solo. No dudes en contactar al consejero estudiantil para conocer las fechas de entrega y los cronogramas. Puedes dejarle notas en el refrigerador para recordarle hasta cuándo puede presentar las solicitudes, pero no lo hagas por él. Te liquidará, lo aseguro. La responsabilidad es de ellos, no tuya. Si lo haces en su lugar, lo estás habilitando a perpetuar esa conducta. Resiste la tentación de salir al rescate.<strong> </strong></li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>Síndrome del último año. </strong>Este estado puede presentarse en el otoño o primavera del último año. Es esa sensación de “Ya terminé (o casi termino)” y “Soy invencible”. Sin embargo, he visto a muchísimos estudiantes de último año complicarse tanto que casi no llegan a graduarse. No se preocupan por cumplir con las tareas, no estudian; lo único que quieren hacer es relajarse y divertirse. Una mala combinación. Las universidades aceptan a los estudiantes en base al rendimiento del último año escolar. Muchos estudiantes leen “fuiste aceptado”, y ni se molestan en leer la letra pequeña. He tenido que atravesar la penosa situación de reunir a una familia al terminar el año escolar, revisar la carta de admisión de la universidad, y tener que leer que la universidad había cambiado de opinión debido al comportamiento errático del estudiante durante el último año. Como padres, es esencial mantener lo académico como prioridad hasta la graduación. “Tomarse un descanso” también significa tomarse un descanso del desarrollo y práctica de habilidades, y ese no es un buen presagio para la etapa universitaria. No será fácil, pero mantente firme y deja en claro las razones.<strong> </strong></li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>Irse de casa. </strong>Y esto nos remonta a ese día en el que cargaste el auto y partiste hacia la carretera para dejar a tu bebé en la universidad. Es un día de emociones encontradas. Por un lado, sentirás mucha nostalgia cuando recuerdes el primer día de kindergarten y te preguntes cuándo voló el tiempo. Por el otro, estarás contando los segundos para subirte al auto y dejarlo allí. Mi hijo estiró al máximo los límites de “Soy independiente” durante el verano siguiente al último año de escuela. Fue horrible. Pensaba que yo era una idiota y tenía una actitud irreverente. Me acuerdo de estar hablando con mi mamá sobre el tema y decirle que no veía la hora de que él se vaya a la universidad. Me dio un gran consejo, como siempre: “Dios encontrará la forma de decirte cuándo es el momento indicado de cortar ciertos lazos”. </li> </ul> <p>A veces me pregunto si ese último verano fue una forma de esconder su ansiedad, y una muestra de que estaba un poco asustado por lo que venía. Se comportó como un sabelotodo que no le importaba otra cosa que no fuera él mismo. Pero, cuando ese día salimos con el auto, noté que no podía mirar la casa donde su adorada mascota lo miraba desde la ventana. Tenía que ser fuerte y valiente. Tenía que serlo para reunir el coraje de dar este salto. Estaba listo para entrar en este mundo nuevo y complicado. Había llegado el momento de permitirle partir y dejar que se arregle por sí solo. </p> <p>Los padres nos preocupamos por nuestros hijos sin importar la edad que tengan. Los míos tienen más de 30 y me sigo preocupando. Me bendijeron con cinco hermosos nietos, y ahora tengo el mejor trabajo del mundo. Soy abuela. No sé si hice todo bien, pero cuando observo a mis hijos y veo los maravillosos padres que son, me siento orgullosa. Sin dudas, es una aventura, y hay muchas lecciones aprendidas que me gustaría compartir. Pero esas historias serán para otros blogs. Mantente alerta…</p> <p><em>Este artículo es parte de una serie de textos que analizan cómo los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos en las transiciones escolares. Lee otras publicaciones sobre el comienzo de la escuela primaria, la transición a la escuela intermedia y el inicio de la escuela secundaria.</em></p> <p>   <strong>  </strong></p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71
CREATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:07:29.537
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:57:09.15
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Guiding Our Children Through School Transitions: Off To College
LASTUPDATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID A0A0E0C0-1365-11E4-98390050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2014-08-14 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES Cómo guiar a nuestros hijos en las transiciones escolares
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Where did the last four years go? I think that’s the question that every parent of a high school senior asks him/herself at the beginning of that last school year. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself looking forward to having your child move out and on to college by the end of the school year.
TEASERES ¿Adónde se fueron los últimos cuatro años? Creo que todos los padres se hacen esta pregunta cuando comienza el último año de la secundaria.
TEASERIMAGE 375A9730-1963-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Guiding Our Children Through School Transitions: Off To College
TITLEES Cómo guiar a nuestros hijos en las transiciones escolares: el ingreso a la universidad
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 585F9140-135A-11E4-98390050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Family Hug

Off To College

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2aAUaDg
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/2biJEhp
BODY <p>Have a kid going off to college? This video will help them--and you--get ready for the transition.</p>
BODYES <p>¿Tiene un niño en camino para la universidad? Este video les ayudara a ellos—y a usted—preparase para la transición. </p>
CATHTML 5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2016-08-09 11:19:01.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:52.023
DESCRIPTION This video from Parent Toolkit guides parents and children through the tough emotional and academic transition from high school to college.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this video from Parent Toolkit that explains how kids and their parents can prepare for the challenging transition of going off to college.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/178199197?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/178202831?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/178199197
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/178202831
FACEBOOKTEXT Have a kid going off to college? This video will help them--and you--get ready for the transition. Find out more by watching the Transition Time video series at ParentToolkit.com!
FACEBOOKTEXTES ¿Tiene un niño en camino para la universidad? Este video les ayudara a ellos—y a usted—preparase para la transición.
LABEL Off To College
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 9923DBF0-5E44-11E6-864A0050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2016-08-09 11:19:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Prepare for Your Kids Heading Off to College
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Off To College
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE How to Prepare for Your Kids Heading Off to College
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Have a kid going off to college? This video will help them--and you--get ready for the transition.
TEASERES ¿Tiene un niño en camino para la universidad? Este video les ayudara a ellos—y a usted—preparase para la transición.
TEASERIMAGE 6135E0E0-18CE-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Off To College
TITLEES Camino a la universidad
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES ¿Tiene un niño en camino para la universidad? Este video les ayudara a ellos—y a usted—preparase para la transición.
TWITTERTWEET Have a kid going off to college? This @EducationNation video will help them-and you-get ready for the transition.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array [empty]

Interview

6 Skills Needed for All Jobs Regardless of Field

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>You have likely heard about “soft skills” before. But what are they? Sometimes referred to as “21<sup>st</sup>-century skills,” “interpersonal skills,” or “applied skills,” they are the skills that are non-technical or specific to a certain job. They are the skills that help you think, communicate with people, and reflect on your experiences. Basically, your young adult needs them to thrive in the workforce. Career coach Jane Horowitz says the basis of her coaching practice is “hire for attitude, train for skills,” and she sees will and drive as being the greatest determinants of young adults getting hired.</p> <p>“We hear it time and time again, it’s the soft skills,” says Terri Tchorzynski, 2017 National School Counselor of the Year. “That’s what allows you to keep the job. Employers can hire our students and train them, but if they don't have the soft skills, it's really hard for them to stay employed."</p> <p>According to the Harvard University “<a href="http://www.gse.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Pathways_to_Prosperity_Feb2011-1.pdf">Pathways to Prosperity Project</a>” study in 2011, U.S. employers are increasingly seeing students graduate from college unequipped to survive in the 21st century workforce. Specifically, they are “deficient” in skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and communication. Bruce Tulgan, founder and CEO of <a href="http://rainmakerthinking.com/">Rainmaker Thinking</a> and expert and author on young people in the workplace, has been tracking the generational change in the workplace since 1993. According to Tulgan (and many other experts and employers), there is a <a href="http://rainmakerthinking.com/assets/uploads/2016/06/Gen-Shift-White-Paper-2016_June.2016.pdf">gap</a> in soft skills from previous generations to the generation entering the workforce today. <a href="https://www.naceweb.org/about-us/press/class-2015-skills-qualities-employers-want.aspx">Employers want</a> certain skills in their employees, regardless of the field. And not only do employers want these skills, but employment and wages have increased in most occupations that require higher social or analytical skills (<a href="http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/13/jobs-requiring-preparation-social-skills-or-both-expected-to-grow-most/">like communication, management, or leaderships skills</a>), according to <a href="http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/06/key-findings-about-the-american-workforce-and-the-changing-job-market/">Pew Research</a>. Most workers understand this too; according to <a href="http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/10/06/the-state-of-american-jobs/st_2016-10-06_jobs-55/">Pew Research</a>, workers say softs skills are more important than technical skills in order to do their jobs.</p> <p>The value of these soft skills can be considered good news! No matter what students study in school or what path they take after high school, they can work to learn these skills to help them be successful in the workplace. These are the six skills your young adult will need no matter what their career path:</p>
BODYES <p>Seguramente has escuchado hablar sobre las “habilidades sociales” pero ¿qué son? A veces se las llama “habilidades para el siglo 21”, “habilidades interpersonales” o “habilidades aplicadas”. Se trata de aquellas habilidades que no son de índole técnica o que son específicas para un trabajo en particular. Son las habilidades que te ayudan a pensar, a comunicarte con la gente y a reflexionar sobre tus experiencias. Básicamente, tu hijo las necesita para desarrollarse en el mundo laboral. La orientadora Jane Horowitz explica que el lema que transmite a sus consultantes es “contratar según la actitud, capacitar para dar habilidades”, y considera que la voluntad y la motivación son los factores determinantes al momento de contratar jóvenes adultos.</p> <p>“Escuchamos constantemente que todo se reduce a las habilidades sociales”, dice Terri Tchorzynski, Consejera Escolar Nacional del Año 2017. “Eso es lo que te permite conservar el trabajo. Los empleadores pueden contratar y capacitar a nuestros hijos, pero si ellos no cuentan con habilidades sociales será muy difícil para ellos mantener su puesto de trabajo”.</p> <p>Según un estudio realizado en 2011 por la Universidad de Harvard, “<a href="http://www.gse.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Pathways_to_Prosperity_Feb2011-1.pdf">Pathways to Prosperity Project (Proyecto Caminos hacia la Prosperidad)</a>“, los empleadores estadounidenses ven con cada vez más frecuencia que los estudiantes se gradúan de la universidad pero no cuentan con las herramientas necesarias para sobrevivir en el mundo laboral del siglo 21. Más específicamente, carecen de habilidades tales como pensamiento crítico, solución de problemas, creatividad y comunicación. Bruce Tulgan, fundador y Director ejecutivo de <a href="http://rainmakerthinking.com/">Rainmaker Thinking</a>, y autor de publicaciones sobre los jóvenes en el lugar de trabajo ha estado llevando un registro de los cambios generacionales en el mundo laboral desde 1993. Según Tulgan (y muchos otros expertos y empleadores), existe una <a href="http://rainmakerthinking.com/assets/uploads/2016/06/Gen-Shift-White-Paper-2016_June.2016.pdf">brecha</a> de habilidades sociales entre las generaciones anteriores y la generación que ingresa al mundo laboral actual. <a href="https://www.naceweb.org/about-us/press/class-2015-skills-qualities-employers-want.aspx">Los empleadores buscan</a> que sus empleados cuenten con ciertas habilidades, independientemente del área de trabajo. Y según <a href="http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/06/key-findings-about-the-american-workforce-and-the-changing-job-market/">Pew Research</a>, no solo los empleadores buscan estas habilidades, sino que también ha aumentado la demanda y los salarios en la mayoría de los trabajos que requieren de habilidades sociales o analíticas más elevadas (<a href="http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/13/jobs-requiring-preparation-social-skills-or-both-expected-to-grow-most/">como por ejemplo habilidades de comunicación, gestión o liderazgo</a>). La mayoría de los trabajadores también comprende esto, y según <a href="http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/10/06/the-state-of-american-jobs/st_2016-10-06_jobs-55/">Pew Research</a>, los trabajadores dicen que para hacer su trabajo las habilidades sociales son más importantes que las habilidades técnicas.</p> <p>Podemos decir entonces que es una buena noticia que se de tanta importancia a las habilidades sociales. No importa lo que los niños estudien en la escuela o qué decidan hacer al terminar la escuela secundaria, pueden aprender a desarrollar estas habilidades que les serán útiles en su futuro lugar de trabajo. Estas son las seis habilidades que un joven adulto necesitará, no importa la profesión que elija.</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F461A216-5056-9A4B-6CDFC2C7B92D7F2D,F4633AEF-5056-9A4B-6CFC734C17EE9A78,F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11,2B6C3F55-5056-9A4B-6C81272D53A7541E,2B71E811-5056-9A4B-6C95674E78ACA0A9,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,092B9C9E-5056-9A4B-6C782E9EDBBACE5D
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-07 13:22:33.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:34.73
DESCRIPTION Applied skills that help you think, communicate with people, and reflect on your experiences, that are great for all jobs in any industry and expertise.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in these 6 skills that will help you succeed in any job or expertise.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Applied skills that help you think, communicate with people, and reflect on your experiences, that are great for all jobs in any industry and expertise.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL 6 Skills Needed for All Jobs Regardless of Field
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID C886E150-1BB6-11E7-873E0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 092B9C9E-5056-9A4B-6C782E9EDBBACE5D
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-07 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 6 Skills Needed for All Jobs
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 6 Skills Needed for All Jobs
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Your young adult needs them to thrive in the workforce.
TEASERES Tu hijo las necesita para desarrollarse en el mundo laboral.
TEASERIMAGE A36DE8B0-1FCF-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE 6 Skills Needed for All Jobs Regardless of Field
TITLEES 6 habilidades necesarias para cualquier trabajo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Check out these 6 skills that will help you succeed in any job or expertise.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceListSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAdviceListItems
array
1 EA7AC910-1BB7-11E7-873E0050569A4B6C
2 0C74C0C0-1BB8-11E7-873E0050569A4B6C
3 1DC2AF40-1BB8-11E7-873E0050569A4B6C
4 2E05E480-1BB8-11E7-873E0050569A4B6C
5 4ABDE880-1B21-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
6 46FFA160-1BB8-11E7-873E0050569A4B6C
7 508EAEB0-1BB8-11E7-873E0050569A4B6C
8 C91DA0E0-2089-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
aFiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09712-C276-9F15-FD7DB04AFF729B25
2 6017C530-1EF9-11E7-B1EF0050569A4B6C
3 DE432130-1EFD-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

Teen Going to College

Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>You may have high hopes for this time to be special; a last chance for you and your teen to bond before they leave. But the reality may not meet all of your expectations. Your teen is likely having just as difficult a time as you processing all of the change. We talked to our <a href="/about/experts/youth-advisors">youth advisors</a> to see if they and their parents thought they were ready to graduate high school. Here are some of their answers, as well as some perspective to keep in mind to help the transition go a lot more smoothly.</p>
BODYES <p>Es posible que tengas grandes esperanzas de que este momento sea especial; una última oportunidad para que tú y tu hijo estrechen los lazos afectivos antes de su partida. Pero es posible que la realidad no cumpla con todas tus expectativas. Probablemente sea tan difícil para tu hijo adolescente procesar todo el cambio como lo es para ti. Hablamos con nuestros <a href="/about/experts/youth-advisors">asesores de jóvenes</a> para que nos cuenten si los estudiantes y sus padres pensaban que estaban preparados para graduarse de la escuela secundaria. A continuación se incluyen algunas de sus respuestas, así como ciertas perspectivas para tener en cuenta para contribuir a que la transición sea más sencilla.</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CMLABEL Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months
CREATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-29 17:14:40.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 17:05:47.707
DESCRIPTION How to make the most of the time between high school graduation and your teen leaving the nest.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in these three ways the make the most of the summer before college with your teen.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT We talked to our youth advisors to see if they and their parents thought they were ready to graduate high school. Here are some of their answers.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months
LASTUPDATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID B85456D0-14C4-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-29 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Three Ways to Make the Most of the Summer Before College
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall
SHORTTITLEES Cómo aprovechar al máximo los próximos tres meses
SOCIALTITLE Three Ways to Make the Most of the Summer Before College
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER The time between high school graduation and leaving the nest is often precious, emotional, and downright scary for both teens and parents.
TEASERES El tiempo entre la graduación de la escuela secundaria y el abandono del nido suele ser valioso, emocional y totalmente atemorizador tanto para los hijos.
TEASERIMAGE 700613F0-17B7-11E7-B45F0050569A4B6C
TITLE Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months
TITLEES Tu hijo irá a la universidad en el otoño... Cómo aprovechar al máximo los próximos tres meses
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Check out these 3 ways to make the most of the summer before college.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 2F0D40C1-14C5-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
2 528B4060-14C5-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
3 AF9EF100-1940-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
4 819332F0-14C5-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
5 0617E400-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 4CDA89D0-1EF9-11E7-B1EF0050569A4B6C

Family of three

Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” While this is nothing to be ashamed about—in fact sharing real-life experiences can provide really important wisdom to your kids—the world looks different today than it did when you were in college. In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted. Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.</p>
BODYES <p>Como padre, probablemente hayas comenzado una oración diciendo: “Cuando yo estudiaba…” Si bien no es nada de lo debas avergonzarte —de hecho compartir experiencias de la vida real puede aportarles sabiduría importante a tus hijos— el mundo es diferente hoy de lo que era <em>cuando</em> <em>tú estabas en la universidad</em>. En realidad, todo el enfoque hacia la vida, el trabajo y el amor ha sufrido un cambio drástico para los adultos jóvenes. A continuación se tratan algunos cambios importantes para tener en cuenta mientras tu hijo adolescente parte hacia la universidad. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CMLABEL Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-31 17:35:32.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:05.713
DESCRIPTION As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about the important changes to recognize about the current college scene:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID F6F12A30-1659-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-31 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Why College Is Not the Same as It Used to Be
SEOTITLEES La universidad no es lo mismo que cuando yo estudiaba
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted.
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted.
TEASERES En realidad, todo el enfoque hacia la vida, el trabajo y el amor ha sufrido un cambio drástico para los adultos jóvenes.
TEASERIMAGE 32BFD5F0-2151-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
TITLEES Por qué la universidad no es lo mismo que cuando yo estudiaba
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college (via @EducationNation)
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 E7617100-165A-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
2 8C7BAD40-165B-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
3 23331550-1983-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
4 CFDC0F30-165B-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
5 15C19560-165C-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
6 4B660930-165C-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
7 0617E400-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 31FB78E0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
2 42715070-2A8B-11E3-823F0050569A5318
3 A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Health and Wellness

Proper nutrition, adequate sleep, and physical activity can all impact academic performance and overall mental and physical wellness.

Nutrition

As a parent, you may worry that your kid will be subsisting on late-night junk food once they’re out of your house and on their own.

Physical Health

Physical activity is important at any age, not only for weight management, but also for prevention of some diseases, improved mood, and improved overall health.

Recommended

Mom arm around daughter

Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Transitions are often a challenging time for many families. Whether it’s going to middle school, going into high school, going to college, or entering the workforce full-time, any major life change comes with mixed emotions. You may be excited one minute and scared or stressed the next. That’s completely normal, and normal for your kids, too. When young adults leave high school or college, the future can seem overwhelming.</p> <p>As a parent, your role in your kids’ lives change as they grow up, but maintaining an open line of communication can be beneficial for everyone.  One of those benefits is on mental health. Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, and an open dialogue, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.</p> <p><strong>What Is “Normal?”</strong></p> <p>Clinical psychologist Dr. Bobbi Wegner has parents who often come to her with concerns about their student’s transition into or out of college. She says that many kids go through adjustment issues, and it’s completely normal. But often young adults and their parents aren’t expecting these feelings to come up, so when they do, there is a heightened sense of worry.</p> <p>“Anxiety and depression is the common cold of mental health, but people don’t talk a lot about it,” Wegner says. “As a parent, a part of helping is normalizing anxiety, and feeling low or depression can be a ‘normal’ part of the experience.”</p> <p>“Normal” difficulties during transition times include increased anxiety, depression, and relationship issues. Young adults can have a hard time making new friends in the work place or at school and start to feel lonely or isolated. Increased workload and responsibilities can contribute to stress. Raising their awareness that those feelings are valid can go a long way.</p> <p><strong>Be Prepared</strong></p> <p>UCLA’s Executive Director of Counseling and Psychological Services Dr. Nicole Presley Green’s biggest advice to parents is to be proactive before there is a problem. Knowing what resources are available on campus, like student counseling centers, is a great step to being prepared. Similarly, making sure your young adult knows about their insurance information can help prepare them should they need to seek care at any point.</p> <p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="/advice-tips/physical-health-and-young-adults-a-parent-s-guide">Guide to Young Adult Health Care</a></p> <p>Being prepared also means maintaining an open line of communication between you and your young adult. That doesn’t mean you have to call them every few hours, but simply letting them know they can call you or reach out whenever they need to. Keep in mind that you’ve been with your kid for most of their life; you know what is normal for them.</p> <p>“It’s a really challenging time for parents. They don’t know how much to let them flourish and flounder, and how much to get involved,” Dr. Green says. “But they do know when their kid is really reaching a point where they need help.”</p> <p><strong>Know the Red Flags</strong></p> <p>As a parent, hearing that it’s “normal” might not help when you’re worried whether or not your kid is able to handle their new world. Fortunately, there are ways for you to help identify whether or not something more serious is going on.</p> <p>Dr. Wegner recommends keeping an eye out for any major changes in behavior in three categories she calls the “holy trilogy of health”:sleeping, eating, and energy. Any major shift in any of those areas (eating much more, eating much less, sleeping much more, sleeping much less, etc.) can be a red flag and a time for you to get curious and ask more about what is going on with your kid.</p> <p>Psychologist Dr. Michele Borba recommends keeping a few questions in mind when you’re talking and listening with your young adult. Ask yourself: </p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>Does he seem to be adjusting?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does she have new friends?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does he seem happy?</p> </li> <li> <p>Are they joining in activities, like going to the gym or joining a club?</p> </li> <li> <p>Do they seem to have pride in their work or school? (For example, “<strong>Our</strong> team just got on a new project,” or “<strong>My</strong> school was listed as one of the top in the state.”)</p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>If you answer “yes” to these questions, it’s likely your teen is adjusting well, even if they say they’re stressed or sad. If they are showing no connections, or no interest in making new friends or getting involved, Dr. Borba says that is a “red flag” that there could be trouble ahead.</p> <p><strong>Acknowledge, Empathize, and Be Intentional</strong></p> <p>Ways to support your young adult are to acknowledge their feelings, empathize with them, and be intentional about the questions you ask. Often, when young adults reach out to parents in times of struggle, they’re looking for support or a shoulder to cry on. Dismissing their feelings or trying to fix their problems for them is a surefire way to end the conversation completely.</p> <p>For example, if your teen is feeling anxious or depressed, don’t dismiss those feelings by saying “That’s not something to be stressed about,” or “Everyone feels like that.” Similarly, trying to fix the problem also isn’t the answer. If your kid says they “don’t have any friends” don’t point out all the friends they had in high school, or their new coworker. It may be that they mean they don’t have the same strong friendships they used to have, which is something that can make them feel isolated or lonely.</p> <p>Instead, be intentional in your responses and turn the question or concern back to them. Dr. Wegner says this is a common tactic used by therapists to validate a patient’s concern, and empower them to find the answers themselves. You could try asking:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>“I’m sorry to hear you’re feeling that way. Why do you think that is?</p> </li> <li> <p>“It sounds like you don’t want to go to class, why is that?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“What do you think is going on?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“What have you tried to make you feel better?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“How can I help you?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“I’ve noticed X, how are you feeling about that?”</p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>Simply by listening, and allowing your young adult to come to conclusions on their own, you’re empowering them to understand more about their feelings and address them.</p> <p><strong>Let</strong> <strong>Your Kids Know It’s O.K. to Ask for Help</strong></p> <p>Asking for help, especially for mental health, is often stigmatized in America. But it doesn’t have to be. For college students, most counseling centers are a free resource that anyone can use. For young adults not enrolled in college, <a href="http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/parity-guide.aspx">most health insurance plans</a> also offer mental health coverage. So visits to a therapist or psychiatrist are often covered in some form. And as far as that stigma, Dr. Wegner says there shouldn’t be shame in asking for help if you need it, even if the situation isn’t dire.</p> <p>“People think it’s something you should only do if you’re clinically depressed and that’s not true,” Wegner says. “You don’t have to make a commitment, and you don’t have to go forever. Sometimes just a few sessions and then moving on can be helpful.”</p> <p>Dr. Green does a lot of outreach on campus to try and decrease stigma associated with getting help. In some cases, that can be recommending parents encourage students to seek help in any way that seems accessible to them. For example, if therapy seems to scary, parents can suggest their students to talk with their RA as a first step.</p> <p><strong>When to Get Professional Help</strong></p> <p>First and foremost, trust your gut instinct. Dr. Green reminds parents that “they know their kid the best.” Any drastic difference in behavior or temperament from what is normal for your young adult can be a sign that something more serious is happening.</p> <p>If your young adult talks about self-harm, suicide, or suicidal thoughts, do not avoid it. Try to find out if they mean they want to hurt themselves right now and, if so, seek immediate help by calling 9-1-1.</p> <p>If your young adult is drinking in excess or using other drugs to the point it is interfering with their ability to function normally, that’s also a time to seek professional help.</p> <p>For a small subset of the population that has psychotic disorders, young adulthood is often when symptoms start showing up. If your young adult is behaving erratically, having hallucinations, staying awake for extended periods of time, or sleeping for extend periods of time, seek professional help.</p> <p>For more help, try any of these resources:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>National Suicide Prevention Life Line—call  1-800-273-8255 or visit <a href="http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/">http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Crisis Text Line – Text “Connect” to 741741 or visit <a href="http://www.crisistextline.org/">www.crisistextline.org</a> </p> </li> <li> <p>Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Locator – call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or visit: <a href="https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/">https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/</a></p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
BODYES <p>Las transiciones suelen ser un gran desafío para muchas familias. Ya sea que tu hijo vaya a ingresar a la escuela intermedia, secundaria, universidad o a empezar a trabajar tiempo completo, todo cambio importante en su vida traerá emociones encontradas. Sentirás mucho entusiasmo en un momento y al minuto siguiente te invadirá el miedo o el estrés. Eso es completamente normal, para ti y para tus hijos. Cuando un joven termina el secundario o la universidad, el futuro puede parecer abrumador.</p> <p>Como padre, tu rol en la vida de tus hijos va cambiando a medida que crecen, pero mantener una línea abierta de comunicación puede beneficiar a todos. Uno de esos beneficios está relacionado con la salud mental. Hablar con tus hijos sobre este tema puede tomar muchas formas, pero si tienes unas preguntas en mente y mantienes un diálogo abierto, puedes ayudar a que estas transiciones se atraviesen con más fluidez.</p> <p><strong>¿Qué es “normal”?</strong></p> <p>La psicóloga clínica Dra. Bobbi Wegner suele recibir a padres que le acercan inquietudes sobre la transición de sus hijos cuando comienzan o terminan la universidad. Ella nos cuenta que muchos jóvenes atraviesan ciertas dificultades en la adaptación, y es completamente normal. Pero muchas veces, tanto los jóvenes como sus padres no esperan que se presenten estas emociones, entonces cuando llegan, vienen acompañadas de una gran preocupación.</p> <p>“La ansiedad y la depresión son el equivalente a un resfrío en cuanto a salud mental, pero las personas no suelen hablar de ello”, relata Wegner. “Como padres, podemos ayudar controlando la ansiedad, y sentirse triste o deprimido puede ser una parte ‘normal’ de la experiencia”.</p> <p>En los tiempos de transición se atraviesan dificultades “normales” como mayor ansiedad, depresión y dificultades en las relaciones. Es posible que a los jóvenes les resulte difícil hacer amigos nuevos en el trabajo o en la escuela, y comiencen a sentirse solos o aislados. Una mayor carga de trabajo y de responsabilidades puede contribuir al estrés. Aceptar que esos sentimientos son válidos puede ser de gran ayuda.</p> <p><strong>Prepárate</strong></p> <p>La directora ejecutiva del Departamento de Asesoramiento y Servicios de Psicología de la UCLA, la Dra. Nicole Presley Green, les aconseja a los padres que sean proactivos antes de que haya un problema. Saber cuáles son los recursos disponibles en el campus, como centros de asesoramiento para estudiantes, es un gran paso para estar preparados. También, asegúrate de que tu hijo tenga toda la información de su seguro médico para que esté preparado en caso de que necesite atención en algún momento.</p> <p>Estar preparado también implica mantener una línea abierta de comunicación entre tú y tu hijo. Esto no significa que debas llamarlo varias veces en el día, simplemente dejarle en claro que te puede llamar o contactar siempre que lo necesite. Ten presente que estuviste a su lado la mayor parte de su vida; tú sabes lo que es normal para él.</p> <p>“Es un momento de gran desafío para los padres. No saben cuánto darles de libertad y cuánto de cierto control”, comenta la Dra. Green. “Pero sí saben cuándo su hijo está alcanzando un punto donde necesita ayuda”.</p> <p><strong>Explorar: </strong><a href="/advice-tips/physical-health-and-young-adults-a-parent-s-guide?lang=es">La salud física y los adultos jóvenes: una guía para padres</a></p> <p><strong>Identifica las señales de alerta</strong></p> <p>Como padre, escuchar que es “normal” podría no ser de mucha ayuda cuando te preocupa si tu hijo está pudiendo manejarse en su nuevo mundo. Por suerte, existen pautas que te ayudarán a identificar si está pasando algo más grave.</p> <p>La Dra. Wegner recomienda prestar especial atención a cambios notorios en su conducta, en tres categorías a las que llama la “trilogía sagrada de la salud”: descanso, alimentación y energía. Cualquier cambio significativo en alguna de estas áreas (comer demasiado, comer muy poco, dormir demasiado, dormir muy poco, etc.) puede representar una señal de alerta y un momento para despertar tu curiosidad y preguntar más para saber qué está ocurriendo con tu hijo.</p> <p>La psicóloga Dra. Michele Borba recomienda tener unas preguntas en mente cuando estás hablando con tu hijo. Pregúntate:</p> <ul> <li> <p>¿Parece que se está adaptando?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Tiene amigos nuevos?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Se lo ve feliz?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Está haciendo actividades, como ir al gimnasio o al club?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Parece estar orgulloso de su trabajo o estudio? (Por ejemplo, “<strong>Nuestro</strong> equipo acaba de comenzar un proyecto nuevo” o “<strong>Mi</strong> escuela fue nombrada como una de las mejores del estado”). </p> </li> </ul> <p>Si puedes responder que “sí” a estas preguntas, es probable que tu hijo se esté adaptando bien aunque diga que está estresado o triste. Si notas que no está haciendo conexiones, o no está interesado en hacer amigos nuevos o en involucrarse, la Dra. Borba sostiene que se trata de una “señal de alerta” de futuros problemas.</p> <p><strong>Reconoce, empatiza y sé claro</strong></p> <p>Una forma de apoyar a tu hijo es reconocer sus sentimientos, empatizar con ellos y ser claro en las preguntas que le haces. Por lo general, cuando un joven se contacta con sus padres en un momento difícil es porque está buscando apoyo o un hombro donde pueda llorar. Desmerecer sus sentimientos o intentar resolver los problemas por ellos es una manera infalible de terminar la conversación por completo.</p> <p>Por ejemplo, si tu hijo se siente ansioso o deprimido, no desmerezcas esos sentimientos diciéndole: “no vale la pena que te estreses por eso” o “a todos les pasa lo mismo”. Del mismo modo, intentar solucionar el problema tampoco es la respuesta. Si tu hijo te dice que “no tiene amigos”, no saques a relucir todos los amigos que tuvo en el secundario o los nuevos compañeros de trabajo. Es posible que quiera decir que no tiene las mismas relaciones de amistad que solía tener, que es algo que puede hacerlo sentir aislado o solo.</p> <p>Por el contrario, sé claro en tus respuestas y devuélvele la pregunta o inquietud. La Dra. Wegner asegura que esta es una táctica frecuente de los terapeutas para validar la preocupación de un paciente, y habilitarlo a que encuentre la respuesta por sus propios medios. Puedes preguntar:</p> <ul> <li> <p>“Lamento saber que te sientes así. ¿A qué crees que se debe?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“Parece que no quieres ir a clase, ¿por qué te pasa eso?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Qué es lo que crees que está ocurriendo?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Qué has intentado para sentirte mejor?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿En qué puedo ayudarte?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“Noté X cosa, ¿cómo te sientes al respecto?”</p> </li> </ul> <p>Simplemente escuchándolo y permitiendo que tu hijo llegue a una conclusión por sí solo, lo estarás ayudando a comprender mejor sus sentimientos y a ocuparse de ellos.</p> <p><strong>Diles que está bien pedir ayuda</strong></p> <p>Pedir ayuda, especialmente si tiene que ver con la salud mental, suele estar estigmatizado en Estados Unidos. Pero no tiene por qué ser así. Para los estudiantes universitarios, la mayoría de los centros de asesoramiento son gratuitos y cualquiera los puede usar. Para los adultos jóvenes no inscritos en la universidad, <a href="http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/parity-guide.aspx">la mayoría de los planes de seguro médico</a> también ofrecen cobertura de salud mental. Por lo tanto, las consultas con un terapeuta o un psiquiatra suelen estar cubiertas de alguna forma. Y con respecto a ese estigma, la Dra. Wegner aclara que nadie debería sentir vergüenza por pedir ayuda si la necesita, aun cuando la situación no sea extrema.  </p> <p>“Muchas personas creen que es algo que solo deberías hacer si sufres una depresión clínica, y eso no es cierto”, agrega Wegner. “No tienes que establecer un compromiso, o ir para siempre. A veces, unas pocas sesiones pueden ayudarte”.</p> <p>La Dra. Green hace trabajos en el campus para disminuir el estigma asociado con recibir ayuda. En algunos casos, se les recomienda a los padres que incentiven a los estudiantes a buscar ayuda por cualquier medio que les parezca accesible. Por ejemplo, si la idea de hacer terapia los asusta, los padres les pueden sugerir hablar con su asesor de residencia en primer lugar.</p> <p><strong>Cuándo solicitar ayuda de un profesional</strong></p> <p>Por sobre todas las cosas, confía en tu instinto. La Dra. Green les recuerda a los padres que “ellos son los que mejor conocen a su hijo”. Cualquier diferencia notoria en la conducta o en el temperamento de tu hijo puede ser la señal de que está ocurriendo algo más serio.</p> <p>Si tu hijo habla de provocarse un daño, de suicidio o de pensamientos suicidas, no lo evites. Intenta averiguar si esto implica que quieren dañarse ahora mismo y, de ser así, pide ayuda de inmediato llamando al 9-1-1.</p> <p>Si tu hijo está bebiendo en exceso o consumiendo drogas al punto de que llegue a interferir en su comportamiento habitual, también es hora de pedir ayuda de un profesional.</p> <p>Para una pequeña parte de la población que sufre trastornos psicóticos, los síntomas comienzan a manifestarse en la juventud. Si tu hijo se está comportando de manera errática, sufre alucinaciones, permanece despierto por largos períodos, o duerme demasiado, busca ayuda de un profesional.</p> <p>Para recibir más ayuda, prueba alguno de estos recursos:</p> <ul> <li> <p>National Suicide Prevention Life Line—llama al  1-800-273-8255 o visita <a href="http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/">http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Crisis Text Line – Envía la palabra “Connect” al 741741 o visita <a href="http://www.crisistextline.org/">www.crisistextline.org</a> </p> </li> <li> <p>Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Locator – llama al 1-800-662-HELP (4357) o visita: <a href="https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/">https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/</a></p> </li> </ul> <p> </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
CMLABEL Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-06 18:33:04.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:30:24.217
DESCRIPTION Talking with your children about mental health can be beneficial for everyone.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Thought you'd be interested in this guide to talking with your children about mental health.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID FF5A9120-1B18-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-06 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Young Adults and Mental Health
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Young Adults and Mental Health
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, and an open dialogue, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.
TEASERES Las transiciones suelen ser un gran desafío para muchas familias.
TEASERIMAGE 4B5B8070-1952-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
TITLEES Adultos jóvenes y salud mental: una guía para padres
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Talking with your children about mental health can be beneficial for everyone. Learn more @educationnation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 F7935730-D79B-11E6-89870050569A5318
2 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318
3 496F0AF0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

teen adult discussion

5 Ways to Talk with Young Adults About Alcohol and Drugs

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>The new-found freedom young adults get as they move out of the house can come with risky behaviors, like experimenting with drugs and alcohol. According to the <a href="https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015.pdf" target="_blank">2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health</a>, about two out of every five young adults (ages 18-25) are binge drinkers. That means they are drinking four or more drinks in one sitting for women, and five or more drinks in one sitting for men.</p> <p>In a perfect world, you’ve been talking with your kids about making responsible decisions since they were young. But if you haven’t had a talk about substance use before, now is a great time to start. This transition time is a great opportunity to revisit or start the conversation, as you are still a role model that your kids look up to. Even if they don’t show it, your teens are still listening to you and will appreciate (if only in the long run) your attention to this topic.</p> <h4>Keep It Informal</h4> <p>This conversation doesn’t need to be a big production. If you’re watching television together and an ad for beer comes on, that’s a perfect time to strike up a casual conversation. As 17 year-old Lily says about her conversations with her parents,</p> <blockquote>“If it comes up, we can keep a calm and fair conversation about it all.”</blockquote> <p>The car is another place to start a conversation on the topic, especially as you have a captive audience. In the car, you won’t have to make eye contact as much, which can make your teen feel more comfortable. If you need help keeping the conversation going, try to ask open-ended questions that will solicit more than a “yes” or “no” answer.</p> <h4>Start From Love</h4> <p>Teens are more likely to engage in a conversation with you if it’s one that actually feels like a conversation, not a lecture. To do that, the director of the Center for Adolescent Research and Education (CARE), Stephen Gray Wallace recommends starting with love. Start with:</p> <blockquote>“You know, I really want to sit down and talk to you about alcohol use because you’re going away to college and I love you and I want you to achieve your goals,” rather than “You and I need to talk because you’re moving out and you need to make good decisions.”</blockquote> <p>“If you start from a place of love and concern, it opens up a lot of doors,” Wallace says. You may even be surprised by the response that you get.</p> <p>17 year-old Riley from California has had conversations with her parents about alcohol, and she says she’s always felt supported in those discussions. </p> <blockquote>“Personally I have no interest in drinking and they know that, but they also say that if you were ever going to make that decision to be responsible. They’ve said we will never get mad at you, you should always text us. We will get mad at you if you get yourself into a bad situation and don’t call us.”</blockquote> <h4>Highlight Consequences</h4> <p>Being realistic about consequences of over-indulging is another way to educate your teen about the risks of substance use. The <a href="https://www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/Statistics/consequences.aspx">consequences</a> include an inability to make responsible decisions, assault, date rape and sexual assault, injury, and even death. In less extreme cases, substance use can lead to lower college grades, falling behind in class, or posting inappropriate photos or video on social media.</p> <p>Then, there are unintended consequences. For example, a derogatory or inappropriate post on social media can result in getting fired from a job. Wallace likes to share a story about a high school senior whose college acceptance was revoked after he was suspended from school for being at a party where alcohol was served. One choice can have really big consequences your teen might not even be thinking of.  Wallace says kids often seem bewildered by consequences that they weren’t expecting. You can help your kids connect the dots between choices they may make and consequences of those actions by highlighting stories like these.</p> <h4>Help Them Plan</h4> <p>If your teen is drinking at college, or after work, they may need ideas to help them if they’re unsure how to remove themselves from a situation or to stand up to peer pressure. By discussing options ahead of time, you can help them be prepared later.</p> <p>Ask them questions about different scenarios they might find themselves in. For example:</p> <ul> <li> <p>“How do you think you’ll respond if you show up at a party where people are using drugs? What if they offer some to you?” </p> </li> <li> <p>“Have you thought about what you might do if you’re at a party that you want to leave, but your friends want to stay?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“What do you think you’ll do if your designated driver ends up drinking or using drugs?”</p> </li> <li> <p>Offer additional suggestions if they need help answering the questions like:</p> </li> <li> <p>Highlight that for jobs and some college extracurricular activities, your teen could be subject to random drug testing. Even if they aren’t subject to it, it’s a good excuse for them not to use.</p> </li> <li> <p>Have a secret family code with your teen, like “1-1-1” or “How is grandma doing?” that they can easily text you if they need your help. You or another family member can then be the one to call and check-in with them, giving them an excuse to leave the room or remove themselves from a situation.</p> </li> <li> <p>Consider a ride-sharing app like Uber or Lyft that is linked to your account. That way, your teen never has an excuse to get in a car with someone or has to worry about paying for a cab.</p> </li> </ul> <h4>Listen</h4> <p>A conversation should be just that, a two-way discussion. Try not to talk down to or talk over your teen. Really listen to their responses and try to be a resource they can use. If you create a family culture of being able to discuss anything and everything, your kids will feel more comfortable sharing information with you and asking for advice. Keeping the lines of communication open are a great way to have not just one discussion about drugs and alcohol, but an ongoing discussion about healthy risks, responsible decisions, and reaching goals. This applies for substance use, but also a variety of other topics as well.</p> <p>Still need more help? Try the additional resources below.</p> <p>The Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility: <a href="https://responsibility.org/" target="_blank">https://responsibility.org/</a></p> <p>Partnership for Drug-Free Kids: <a href="http://www.drugfree.org/" target="_blank">http://www.drugfree.org/</a></p>
BODYES <p>La libertad con la que se encuentran los jóvenes al mudarse de casa puede estar acompañada de comportamientos peligrosos, como el consumo de drogas y de alcohol. Según la encuesta <a href="https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015.pdf" target="_blank">2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health</a>, alrededor de dos de cada cinco jóvenes (18-25 años) beben en exceso cuando salen. Esto quiere decir que las mujeres beben cuatro o más tragos en una salida, y los hombres, cinco o más.</p> <p>En un mundo perfecto, has estado hablando con tus hijos desde pequeños sobre tomar decisiones responsables. Pero si nunca hablaste con ellos sobre el consumo de drogas, es un muy buen momento para comenzar. Este tiempo de transición es una gran oportunidad para retomar o iniciar la conversación, ya que aún eres un modelo a seguir para tus hijos. Aunque no lo demuestren, tus hijos todavía te escuchan y valorarán (al menos a largo plazo) la dedicación que le des a este tema.</p> <h4>Genera una charla informal</h4> <p>Esta conversación no tiene por qué armarse con una gran producción. Si están mirando televisión juntos, y aparece una publicidad de cerveza, es un momento ideal para generar una conversación informal sobre el tema. Lily, de 17 años, cuenta algo similar de las conversaciones con sus padres:</p> <blockquote>“si surge, tenemos una conversación tranquila y relajada sobre cualquier tema”.</blockquote> <p>El auto es otro lugar donde puedes comenzar a hablar, sobre todo, porque tienes un público atento. No hará falta que hagas mucho contacto visual, lo que puede resultarle más cómodo a tu hijo. Si necesitas ayuda para continuar la conversación, intenta hacer preguntas con final abierto que requieran algo más que un “sí” o un “no” como respuesta.</p> <h4>Comienza desde el amor</h4> <p>Es más probable que un adolescente se involucre en una conversación contigo si se parece más a una charla que a un sermón. Para lograr eso, el director del Center for Adolescent Research and Education (CARE), Stephen Gray Wallace, recomienda comenzar desde el amor. Puedes iniciar la charla con:</p> <blockquote>“me gustaría que nos sentemos y hablemos sobre el consumo de alcohol porque estás por ir a la universidad, te amo y quiero que alcances todo lo que te propongas” en lugar de “tú y yo tenemos que hablar porque te estás por mudar y es necesario que tomes buenas decisiones”.</blockquote> <p>“Si comienzas desde un lugar de amor y preocupación, se abren muchas puertas”, agrega Wallace. Podría sorprenderte su respuesta.</p> <p>Riley, una joven de 17 años de California, ha conversado con sus padres sobre el alcohol, y asegura que siempre se sintió contenida en esas charlas.</p> <blockquote>“Personalmente, no me interesa tomar bebidas alcohólicas y ellos lo saben, pero me han dejado en claro que si en algún momento lo hago que sea responsable. Me han dicho que no se enojarán conmigo, que siempre les envíe mensajes. Solo se enfadarían conmigo si tengo un problema y no los llamo”.</blockquote> <h4>Remarca las consecuencias</h4> <p>Ser realista sobre las consecuencias de excederse en una elección es otra forma de educar a tu hijo sobre los riesgos que conlleva el consumo de drogas. Las <a href="https://www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/Statistics/consequences.aspx">consecuencias</a> incluyen la incapacidad de tomar decisiones responsables, ser víctima de una agresión, de una violación y de un ataque sexual, tener un accidente y hasta morir. En casos menos extremos, el consumo de drogas puede provocar un bajo rendimiento académico, atrasarse en las clases, o publicar fotos o videos inapropiados en las redes sociales.</p> <p>A partir de aquí, llegan las consecuencias no buscadas. Por ejemplo, una publicación despectiva o inapropiada en las redes sociales puede generar que lo despidan de su trabajo. A Wallace le gusta compartir una historia sobre un estudiante del último año de la secundaria cuya admisión universitaria fue revocada después de ser suspendido en la escuela por haber estado en una fiesta en la que había alcohol. Una decisión puede tener serias consecuencias que tu hijo ni siquiera imagina. Wallace sostiene que los jóvenes suelen desconcertarse ante consecuencias inesperadas. Puedes contar ese tipo de historias para ayudarlos a relacionar las decisiones que puedan tomar con las consecuencias de dichas acciones.</p> <h4>Ayúdalos a planificar</h4> <p>Si tu hijo está bebiendo en la universidad o después del trabajo, es posible que necesite ideas que lo ayuden a alejarse de esa situación o a hacerle frente a la presión de un par. Si las opciones se discuten con tiempo, podrás ayudarlos a estar preparados para lo que pueda ocurrir.</p> <p>Pregúntale sobre diferentes escenarios que podría encontrar. Por ejemplo:</p> <ul> <li> <p>“¿Cómo crees que reaccionarías si llegas a una fiesta donde están consumiendo drogas? ¿Qué harías si te ofrecen a ti?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Has pensado qué podrías hacer si estás en una fiesta de la que te quieres ir, pero tus amigos prefieren quedarse?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Qué harías si el conductor designado termina bebiendo o consumiendo drogas?”</p> </li> <li> <p>Ofrécele otras sugerencias si necesita ayuda para responder estas preguntas:</p> </li> <li> <p>Haz hincapié en que en algunos trabajos y en determinadas actividades extracurriculares de la universidad le podrían hacer pruebas toxicológicas al azar. Aunque no sea así, es una buena excusa para que no consuma drogas.</p> </li> <li> <p>Establece un código familiar secreto con tu hijo, como “1-1-1” o “¿cómo está la abuela?”, que pueda enviar fácilmente por mensaje si necesita ayuda. Tú u otro familiar lo llamará y verificará cómo está todo, dándole una excusa para que salga de una habitación o pueda alejarse de una situación.</p> </li> <li> <p>Considera una aplicación para obtener transporte como Uber o Lyft que esté vinculada a tu cuenta. De este modo, tu hijo no tendrá que preocuparse por quién lo lleve o por pagar un taxi.</p> </li> </ul> <h4>Escucha</h4> <p>Una conversación debe ser eso, un diálogo entre dos. Trata de no hablarle con soberbia o por encima de él. Escucha sus respuestas y sé una fuente de ayuda. Si creas una cultura familiar de poder hablar de todo, tus hijos se sentirán más cómodos para compartir información contigo y pedirte consejos. Tener una comunicación abierta con tu hijo implica no solo dialogar sobre drogas y alcohol, sino mantener un diálogo continuo sobre riesgos en la salud, decisiones responsables y logro de objetivos. Esto se aplica para el consumo de drogas, pero también para una variedad de otros temas.</p> <p>¿Necesitas más ayuda? Prueba con estos recursos adicionales.</p> <p>The Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility: <a href="https://responsibility.org/" target="_blank">https://responsibility.org/</a></p> <p>Partnership for Drug-Free Kids: <a href="http://www.drugfree.org/" target="_blank">http://www.drugfree.org/</a></p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
CMLABEL 5 Ways to Talk with Young Adults About Alcohol and Drugs
CREATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-05-18 15:23:41.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-22 11:29:34.053
DESCRIPTION Beyond talking about responsible decision making, if you haven’t had a talk about alcohol and substance use before, now is a great time to start.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT If you haven’t had a talk about substance use before, now is a great time to start. Check out these 5 tips.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Beyond talking about responsible decision making, if you haven’t had a talk about alcohol and substance use before, now is a great time to start.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL 5 Ways to Talk with Young Adults About Alcohol and Drugs
LASTUPDATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 7FC8BA10-3BFF-11E7-88E70050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-07 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Talk to Teens About Alcohol
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 5 Tips to Make Talking About Alcohol with Teens Easier
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER If you haven’t had a talk about substance use before, now is a great time to start. Check out these 5 tips.
TEASERES La libertad con la que se encuentran los jóvenes al mudarse de casa puede estar acompañada de comportamientos peligrosos, como el consumo de drogas y de alcohol.
TEASERIMAGE 0C411E80-22C7-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE 5 Ways to Talk with Young Adults About Alcohol and Drugs
TITLEES 5 formas de hablar con los jóvenes sobre alcohol y drogas
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET These 5 ways will help you talk with young adults in your life about alcohol and drugs.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09720-C4F7-9B57-ED926CFAC5272578
2 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

teen stress

My Young Adult Is Stressed. What Do I Do?

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>We all face it in life in some form: stress. The early years after leaving the house can be an especially tumultuous time for young people, with new <a href="/advice-tips/is-my-teen-academically-prepared-for-college-how-to-know">academic</a> stressors, changing <a href="/advice-article/teens-and-relationships-a-parent-s-role">relationships</a>, and learning to <a href="/advice-lists/8-life-skills-your-teen-needs-before-moving-out">live independently</a>. Your young adult cannot avoid stress in their life, but they can learn how to deal with it. While you may not be able to able to relieve their stress altogether, there are some ways you can support them without overstepping your bounds. </p>
BODYES <p>Estrés: todos lo enfrentamos de alguna forma en nuestras vidas. Los primeros años después de irse de casa pueden ser una época especialmente tumultuosa para los jóvenes, con nuevos factores de estrés <a href="/advice-tips/is-my-teen-academically-prepared-for-college-how-to-know">académico</a>, cambios en las <a href="/advice-article/teens-and-relationships-a-parent-s-role">relaciones</a>, y el hecho de aprender a vivir en <a href="/advice-lists/8-life-skills-your-teen-needs-before-moving-out">forma independiente</a>. Tu hijo no puede evitar el estrés en su vida, pero puede aprender a enfrentarlo. Si bien es posible que no puedas aliviar todo su estrés, hay algunas maneras en que puedes ayudarlo sin sobrepasar tus límites.</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949,2B76EB3C-5056-9A4B-6CCA6D788CA78AE2
CMLABEL My Young Adult Is Stressed. What Do I Do?
CREATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-13 17:13:04.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:03.98
DESCRIPTION There are simple ways that allow you to help manage your young adult's stress and support them without taking over.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Check out these tips to help your young adult manage their stress, from Parent Toolkit.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Watch for stress signs, help them find resources and more ways to help your young adult manage their stress.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL My Young Adult Is Stressed. What Do I Do?
LASTUPDATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID FACB3B30-208D-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-13 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE My Young Adult Is Stressed. What Do I Do?
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE What to Do When Your Young Adult Is Stressed
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Your young adult cannot avoid stress in their life, but they can learn how to deal with it.
TEASERES Si bien es posible que no puedas aliviar todo su estrés, hay algunas maneras en que puedes ayudarlo sin sobrepasar tus límites.
TEASERIMAGE C4500650-22C5-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE My Young Adult Is Stressed. What Do I Do?
TITLEES Mi hijo está estresado. ¿Qué hago?
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Watch for stress signs, help them find resources and more ways to help your young adult manage their stress.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 8FF173A1-208E-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
2 23331550-1983-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
3 FA432A00-208E-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
4 FF5A9120-1B18-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
5 0A2EC960-208F-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
6 6D5CFB90-208C-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 133ADA40-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

sad girl

Guiding Our Children: A Parent’s Worst Nightmare

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1jKizq7
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p><em>In honor of Mental Illness Awareness week, we wanted to talk to Parent Toolkit expert and school counselor Dr. Shari Sevier about how parents can support their children on a topic that is often hard to talk about. She shares with us her personal story and words of wisdom.  </em></p> <p>I can still remember the look on my grandmother’s face as we left the cemetery following the funeral for my cousin. She looked so bewildered, probably in shock. She couldn’t comprehend what had happened--no one could--but, for her, it was almost more than she could bear. Her grandson, who she loved so much, had committed suicide. She looked into the eyes of family member after family member, asking “why?” The grief was etched into her face with sorrow and immense pain. There were no answers; we all looked away. But I have carried that face in my memory and heart ever since.</p> <p>Suicide. It is a parent’s worst nightmare. To realize that the intense love we have for our children is not enough to carry them through tough times is unfathomable. Our every instinct is to protect; how can it not be enough? Was there something else we could have done? Was there more we could have said? That’s all we are left with…questions that will forever go unanswered.</p> <p>We may have unanswered questions, but there are things we can do to be proactive in helping our children through challenging times. After a series of area suicides several years ago, my boss asked me what I would do if that happened in our school district. I began to list the steps I would take, and she smiled.  She knew I would go overboard in a response. But that bothered me.  I didn’t want to focus on a response---I wanted, and still want, to focus on <span style="text-decoration: underline;">prevention. So let’s start there.</span></p> <p><strong>Unconditional Love: </strong> Our children need to know that their parents love them unconditionally. Yes, they are going to mess up. Yes, they will make poor decisions. Yes, they will do and say things that are infuriating. Yes, they will be embarrassing. Before we take them to task for those things, let’s take a step back and see if we can remember doing the exact same things to our parents. If kids can’t mess up and be certain that their parents will still love them, who can they go to for acceptance? Loving them doesn’t mean that we have to like everything they do, think and say.  But we do have to like (love) our children enough to take those moments and help them to look at the situation, consider the consequences, and ask themselves how that situation could have turned out differently. Human beings are not perfect, and we should not expect perfection from our children. They need to be and feel loved for who they are.</p> <p>As parents, it’s important to watch what we say and do when our kids are stressing us out the most. An off-handed comment, said in anger, can be perceived as truth. And that truth can take on a life of its own, leading to feelings of inadequacy, worthlessness, and hopelessness. A student told me that his mom said she wished she’d never had him. Now, I’ll be honest, this child was more than a handful.  I understand why mom might have said that in anger.  But I also saw all that she was doing to help him; there was no question that she loved him and was devoted to his well-being. All he could think about was her comment. We have to remember that, once words come out of our mouths, we can never get them back. </p> <p>Related: <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=D5B127A0-5610-11E4-ADC90050569A5318">Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child's Body Image</a></p> <p><strong>Resilience</strong><strong>:</strong> In my line of work, I often see individuals who have little resilience. Setbacks knock them on their cans, and some have a very tough time bouncing back from them. They see themselves as failures and, at its worst, this can spiral out of control to helplessness and hopelessness. Those individuals who possess resilience have good problem-solving skills. They can accept responsibility for mess ups and not feel they are failures.  They have an important adult in their corner.<strong>  </strong>These characteristics are built through relationships and, as parents, we would hope that the primary relationship in our child’s life is the one with mom or dad. </p> <p>I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve heard children tell me that their parents will “kill” them if they don’t score well on a college admissions test, or get into a specific college.  I’ve had parents remove children from activities they enjoy because the parent feels a different activity is “more socially acceptable.” I once had a junior male student who had a hole in his schedule. I sat with him and gave him the only two courses available to fill that spot. He could not do it; he ended up turning to his mom, and she picked the class. Do I believe that she thought she was being a good mom? Yes, absolutely.  But the reality was, this boy was so unsure of himself that he couldn’t even choose an elective class by himself. I found myself wondering how he would survive at college…or in life.</p> <p>I received a great piece of advice when I took my daughter to college.  The parents were gathered into a group while the kids were settling in.  Our speaker said, “You are going to get a phone call one of these days, and your child will tell you of some challenge that’s facing them. Do them a favor…and you…and ask them, “So, what are you going to do about it?’”  I loved that advice, and I’ve used it over and over again in my personal and professional lives.  When people are resilient, they can sit back and figure out an answer to that question.  Developing that answer empowers them.  It builds self-confidence, problem-solving skills, coping skills…it moves them from being a victim to a survivor.  It’s critical to enhance resilience in our children and, in so doing, they will feel our unconditional love.</p> <p><strong>Acknowledge and Address Mental Illness:</strong>  There are times when mental illness strikes.  Depression and anxiety can take over the life of a previously happy individual.  It can happen to our children.  As with any type of illness, it’s critical that we acknowledge there is an issue and we get help.  It’s also critical that we stay the course with that help until the medical professionals provide a release.  With mental illness, people “get into their heads” and have a difficult time getting out.  We need professionals to guide and advise us at those times.  There may be a need for medication, or residential treatment.  Don’t think you can avoid it; the results can be disastrous.  Attending to these needs must be a first priority.  I don’t care how many activities are coming up, how many social events, or sports events, or school events are on the horizon; if your doctor says a certain type of treatment is necessary, get it…and don’t let your child convince you otherwise.  Ignoring it can lead to disaster and tragedy. </p> <p>Know the warning signs of those contemplating suicide.  Pay attention to your child’s demeanor, relationships, and behaviors.  If your child has been struggling and, all of a sudden, s/he seems so much better, call a professional and have them assess the situation.  If they start giving away favorite items, call a professional.  If they make comments about “not being here” or “if/when I’m gone”, call a professional.  At these times, we want our kids to be better so badly that we may be overlooking a telltale sign of suicidal intention.  Get smart, be savvy, and watch like a hawk.  There are so many resources out there…REACH OUT AND USE THEM.</p> <p>If you suspect a depression or anxiety, please do not stick your head in the sand.  Get help!  Rarely is it something that you can deal with in-house.  It’s an illness, and it’s serious.  I think that sometimes people don’t want to admit there are issues because of how it “reflects on the family.”  This isn’t about the family.  This is about someone’s life.  I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve been asked not to tell people at school (i.e. teachers) that someone is getting outside help.  That typically starts a very serious conversation about the fact that the school is here to help.  If teachers know that a student is struggling, they can be more vigilant in their observations of that student.  When kids are struggling, it’s important to have a team approach with as many sets of eyes upon them as possible.  The more people holding the safety net the better.</p> <p>This blog has been hard to write.  I’ve struggled with it even though I have a lot of knowledge about this topic, and lots of experience with kids in distress.  I don’t know how to put the urgency I feel about this topic into words.  Love your kids for all of their differences and difficulties.  Accept and love them for who they are.  Teach them good problem solving skills from the time they are little, and empower them to solve life’s issues as they come up.  Get the appropriate help for them when it’s needed, and seek out every possible resource.  Watch, listen, learn, and act.  Suicide is a very real problem amongst adolescents and teenagers.  Let’s do everything we can to keep the nightmare from recurring. </p>
BODYES <p>En el marco de la semana de concientización sobre las enfermedades mentales, charlamos con la consejera escolar y experta de Parent Toolkit, la Dra. Shari Sevier, sobre cómo los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos en un tema sobre el que es tan difícil hablar. Ella compartió con nosotros su historia personal y sus sabias palabras.</p> <p>Todavía recuerdo la cara de mi abuela cuando salíamos del cementerio después del funeral de mi primo. Estaba tan desconcertada, seguramente en estado de shock. No podía comprender lo que había ocurrido, nadie podía, pero para ella era más de lo que podía soportar. Su nieto, al que amaba con todo su corazón, se había suicidado. Miraba a cada uno de los miembros de nuestra familia y nos preguntaba “¿por qué?” El sufrimiento se dibujaba en su rostro, con una tristeza y un dolor inmensos. Pero nadie tenía la respuesta; todos apartábamos la mirada. Desde entonces, el rostro de mi abuela está grabado en mi memoria y en mi corazón.</p> <p>El suicidio. La peor pesadilla de un padre. Darnos cuenta de que el amor inmenso que tenemos por nuestros hijos no es suficiente para ayudarlos a superar los momentos difíciles es terriblemente doloroso. Nuestro instinto es protegerlos ¿cómo es posible que no sea suficiente? ¿Podríamos haber hecho alguna otra cosa? ¿Podríamos haber dicho algo más? Y eso es lo único que nos queda... preguntas que nunca tendrán respuesta.</p> <p>Tal vez tengamos preguntas sin responder, pero hay cosas que podemos hacer para ser proactivos y ayudar a nuestros hijos a superar los momentos difíciles. Hace varios años, y después de una serie de suicidios en el área, mi jefa me preguntó qué haría yo si eso ocurriera en nuestro distrito escolar. Comencé a enumerar los pasos que tomaría, y ella sonrió. Sabía que exageraría en mi respuesta. Y eso me molestó. No quería concentrarme en una respuesta... quería, y todavía quiero, enfocarme en la prevención. Así que comencemos por eso.</p> <p><strong>Amor incondicional:</strong> nuestros hijos necesitan saber que sus padres los aman incondicionalmente. Sí, van a meter la pata. Sí, tomarán pésimas decisiones. Sí, dirán y harán cosas exasperantes. Sí, harán papelones. Pero antes de reprenderlos, hagamos un poco de retrospectiva y tratemos de recordar cuando les hacíamos exactamente las mismas cosas a nuestros padres. Si los niños no pueden equivocarse y tener la certeza de que sus padres los seguirán amando, ¿a quién podrán recurrir para buscar aceptación? Amar a nuestros hijos no significa que nos tiene que gustar todo lo que hacen, piensan y dicen. Pero sí tienen que gustarnos ellos, tenemos que amarlos a ellos lo suficiente para aprovechar esos momentos y ayudarlos a analizar la situación, a considerar las consecuencias, y a preguntarse a sí mismos de qué otra forma podría haberse resuelto la situación. Los seres humanos no son perfectos, y no debemos exigir la perfección a nuestros hijos. Necesitan sentirse amados y saber que son amados por quiénes son.</p> <p>Como padres es importante prestar atención a lo que decimos y hacemos cuando nuestros hijos nos hacen enojar. Un comentario de pasada, dicho con enojo, puede ser percibido como una verdad. Y esa verdad puede cobrar vida y engendrar sentimientos de ineptitud, inutilidad y desesperanza. Un estudiante me contó que su mamá le había dicho que deseaba no haberlo tenido nunca. Seré sincera, el chico era bastante problemático, así que entiendo por qué la madre pudo haber dicho eso cuando estaba enojada. Pero también vi todo lo que ella hacía para ayudarlo. Era indudable que lo amaba y hacía todo lo posible para que su hijo estuviera bien. Pero él solo podía pensar en ese comentario. Debemos recordar que una vez que las palabras salen de nuestra boca, ya no pueden regresar.</p> <p><strong>Resiliencia:</strong> en mi línea de trabajo muchas veces veo a personas que tienen poca resiliencia. Los reveses los noquean, y a algunos se les hace muy difícil recuperarse. Se ven a sí mismos como un fracaso y, en el peor de los casos, esto puede descontrolarse y transformarse en impotencia y desesperanza. Las personas que poseen resiliencia son capaces de resolver los problemas, pueden aceptar su responsabilidad cuando cometen errores y no sienten que son un fracaso. Cuentan con un adulto que los apuntale. Estas características se construyen por medio de las relaciones y, como padres, esperamos que la relación más importante en la vida de nuestros hijos sea la que desarrollen con su mamá o su papá. v</p> <p>Ya perdí la cuenta de la cantidad de veces que los chicos me han dicho que sus padres los “matarían” si no conseguían un buen puntaje en el examen de ingreso a la universidad o si no lograban ingresar en determinada universidad. He tratado con padres que sacaron a sus hijos de las actividades que disfrutaban porque creían que otra actividad era “más aceptada socialmente”. En una ocasión, un estudiante tenía un hueco en su horario, me reuní con él y le indiqué los únicos dos cursos disponibles para cubrir ese tiempo libre. No pudo tomar la decisión; terminó recurriendo a su mamá y ella eligió la clase. ¿Creo que ella consideraba que estaba siendo una buena madre? Sí, absolutamente. Pero la realidad es que este chico era tan inseguro que ni siquiera podía elegir una clase electiva por sí mismo. Me pregunté cómo haría para sobrevivir en la universidad... o en la vida.</p> <p>Cuando llevé a mi hija a la universidad me dieron un consejo excelente. Mientras los chicos se acomodaban, reunieron a los padres y el orador nos dijo: “Seguramente en estos días recibirán una llamada, y su hijo les contará sobre algún desafío que deba enfrentar. Háganle un favor... y háganse un favor, pregúntele ‘Entonces ¿qué vas a hacer?’” Me pareció genial, y lo he aplicado innumerables veces en mi vida personal y profesional. Cuando las personas son resilientes pueden tomarse un momento para buscar una respuesta al problema. El poder encontrar esa respuesta los fortalece. Desarrollan autoconfianza, habilidades para resolver problemas, estrategias para enfrentarlos... les permite transformarse de víctima en superviviente. Es fundamental fortalecer la resiliencia en nuestros hijos y, al hacerlo, sentirán nuestro amor incondicional.</p> <p><strong>Aceptar y abordar una enfermedad mental:</strong> hay momentos en que las enfermedades mentales se hacen presentes. La depresión y la ansiedad pueden tomar el control de la vida de una persona que antes era feliz. Puede ocurrirles a nuestros hijos. Al igual que con cualquier otra enfermedad, es vital que aceptemos que hay un problema y que busquemos ayuda. También es fundamental que sigamos el tratamiento indicado hasta que los profesionales médicos den el alta. Cuando se trata de enfermedades mentales, las personas “se meten en sus cabezas” y se les hace muy difícil poder salir. Necesitamos ayuda profesional para que nos guíen y aconsejen en esos momentos. Tal vez sea necesario recetar algún tipo de medicamento o realizar un tratamiento domiciliario. No crean que pueden evitarlo, los resultados pueden ser desastrosos. Ocuparse de esto debe ser una prioridad. No importa qué actividades hayan planeado, o los eventos sociales, deportivos o escolares que se acerquen. Si el médico dice que es necesario hacer cierto tipo de tratamiento, háganlo... y no permitan que sus hijos los convenzan de lo contrario. Ignorar esto puede llevar al desastre y a la tragedia.</p> <p>Deben conocer los signos de advertencia de las personas que están pensando en suicidarse. Presten atención al comportamiento de su hijo, a sus relaciones y conductas. Si ha estado pasando por un momento difícil y de repente parece que está mucho mejor, consulten con un profesional para que evalúe la situación. Si comienza a regalar sus cosas favoritas, llamen a un profesional. Si hace comentarios sobre “no estar aquí” o del estilo “cuando no esté”, llamen a un profesional. En esos momentos deseamos tanto que nuestros hijos se sientan mejor que tal vez pasemos por alto un signo revelador de la intención suicida. Hay que estar atentos y vigilar como halcones. Existen muchos recursos... PIDE AYUDA Y ÚSALOS.</p> <p>Si sospechas que se trata de depresión o ansiedad, no escondas la cabeza como el avestruz. ¡Busca ayuda! Muy pocas veces es algo con lo que puedas lidiar en casa. Es una enfermedad y es grave. Creo que, a veces, la gente no quiere admitir que tiene problemas por temor a “lo que pensarán de la familia”. Pero no se trata de la imagen de la familia, se trata de la vida de una persona. Es increíble la cantidad de veces que me han pedido que no contara a la gente de la escuela (es decir, a los maestros) que alguien estaba recibiendo ayuda externa. Esto automáticamente me lleva a iniciar una conversación muy seria sobre el hecho de que la escuela está para ayudar. Si los maestros saben que un estudiante está luchando con algún problema, pueden estar más atentos y alertas en sus observaciones. Cuando un niño o adolescente padece este tipo de problemas, es importante trabajar en equipo, con la mayor cantidad posible de personas vigilándolo. Cuantas más personas formen la red de contención, mejor será.</p> <p>Escribir este artículo ha sido muy difícil, a pesar de que cuento con extensos conocimientos sobre el tema y amplia experiencia con niños que sufren. No sé cómo poner en palabras la importancia y la urgencia que merece el tratamiento de este tema. Amen a sus hijos con todas sus diferencias y dificultades. Acéptenlos y ámenlos por quienes son. Enséñenles a resolver los problemas desde que son pequeños y fortalézcanlos para que puedan enfrentar los problemas de la vida a medida que se presenten. Busquen la ayuda adecuada cuando la necesiten y agoten todas las posibilidades. Miren, escuchen, aprendan y actúen. El suicidio es un problema muy real entre los adolescentes. Hagamos todo lo posible para evitar que esta pesadilla se repita.</p>
CATHTML F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:29:08.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:28:57.797
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES En el marco de la semana de concientización sobre las enfermedades mentales.
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Guiding Our Children: A Parent’s Worst Nightmare
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID DB9FE880-66D7-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2015-10-05 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES Cómo guiar a nuestros hijos
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER How parents can support their children on a topic that is often hard to talk about. She shares with us her personal story and words of wisdom.
TEASERES En el marco de la semana de concientización sobre las enfermedades mentales, charlamos con la consejera escolar y experta de Parent Toolkit, la Dra. Shari Sevier, sobre cómo los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos en un tema sobre el que es tan difícil hablar.
TEASERIMAGE 4D0AF1C0-2461-11E7-AA190050569A4B6C
TITLE Guiding Our Children: A Parent’s Worst Nightmare
TITLEES Cómo guiar a nuestros hijos: la peor pesadilla de un padre
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 585F9140-135A-11E4-98390050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Financial Literacy

Understanding how to manage finances is an important part of your teen’s growth and ultimate independence. Like any skill, financial literacy needs to be taught.

Saving & Spending

Use these strategies to teach and motivate your teen to establish responsible saving and spending habits.

Paying for College

Discover information, tips and advice on how you and your teen can take advantage of programs, scholarships and more help to pay for college.

Recommended

teen mom celebrate

Breaking Down Award Letters

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Once your teen has been accepted to college, they will receive a financial aid award letter. An award letter is a detailed statement of financial assistance available to a student in the form of scholarships, grants, federal loans, and work-study. The money offered in the letter is based on the student’s financial need and is determined by the information the family provided in their <a href="/advice-article/fafsa-101">FAFSA </a>application. Also included in the letter is the cost to attend the institution, the family’s expected family contribution, and in some cases the remaining amount of money needed. While award letters sound like your student has hit the jackpot, not all of the figures listed on the letter are “gifts.” Therefore, you want to take a close look at all of the numbers to identify how much the school is actually going to cost over the course of four years. Each year that your student is enrolled in school they will receive a new financial aid package based on their FAFSA application.</p>
BODYES <p>Cuando tu hijo es aceptado en la universidad, recibirá una carta de concesión de ayuda financiera. Esta carta de concesión es un resumen detallado de las opciones de asistencia disponibles: becas, subvenciones, préstamos federales y planes de trabajo-estudio. La suma de dinero que se ofrece en la carta se basa en las necesidades financieras del estudiante, según se determina a partir de la información que se proporcionó en la solicitud <a href="/advice-article/fafsa-101">FAFSA</a>. En la carta también se incluye el costo de asistir a la institución, la contribución familiar esperada y, en algunos casos, la suma de dinero remanente necesaria. Si bien al recibir esta carta puedes pensar que tu hijo se ganó la lotería, no todas las cifras que aparecen son un “regalo”. Debes prestar atención a todos los números para poder saber cuánto costará la universidad en el curso de los cuatro años. Por cada año que tu hijo se inscriba en la universidad, recibirá un nuevo paquete de ayuda financiera basado en la solicitud FAFSA. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7B4A16-5056-9A4B-6CB315AFE94D0D7D,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD
CMLABEL Breaking Down Award Letters
CREATEDBY andyweishaar_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-29 09:28:47.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:30:46.82
DESCRIPTION An award letter is a detailed statement of financial assistance available to a student in the form of scholarships, grants, federal loans, and work-study
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Thought you'd be interested in this to better understand what kind of financial aid a school is offering.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Want to better understand what kind of financial aid a school is offering? Check this out via @EducationNation.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Breaking Down Award Letters
LASTUPDATEDBY andyweishaar_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID A305FF40-1483-11E7-953B0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68
PTOPIC F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-28 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Better Understand Financial Aid Award Letters
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Better Understand Financial Aid Award Letters
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER How to better understand what kind of financial aid a school is offering.
TEASERES Cómo entender mejor el tipo de ayuda financiera que ofrece una universidad
TEASERIMAGE D468EEB0-38A7-11E7-9CDE0050569A4B6C
TITLE Breaking Down Award Letters
TITLEES Análisis de las cartas de concesión de préstamos
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Want to better understand what kind of #financialaid a school is offering? Check this out via @EducationNation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 92DE24F0-14A9-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
2 22092530-14AA-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
3 2B57F530-14AA-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
4 6F720A30-14AA-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 F48DEAB0-1EFD-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

father son college

Paying for College: What You Need to do Now Before Your Teen Starts College in the Fall

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1Iu7m1W
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Getting ready to send my son to college a few summers ago, I felt excited to see him start a new chapter of his life, but felt sad about the prospect of no longer sharing nightly meals or daily conversations with him. While dealing with such feelings, parents may find it hard to help their child focus on the tasks they need to complete before they leave for campus in the fall. Because many of these tasks involve finances, however, parental support is essential.  Here are some items to talk about with your child before they starts college in the fall.</p> <h4><strong>Paying College Bills</strong></h4> <p>Most colleges no longer mail paper bills. Instead, they send bills to a secure online student portal a month or two before the start of each semester. Information about the student’s financial aid award is also available here. Keep in mind that the bill will be reduced only by the gift aid that the student received, if any. Students will still need to apply for loans through their financial aid office and earn work-study awards once they get to campus.</p> <p>Students can give parents access to their bill by following the directions on the institution’s website under “student accounts” or “paying bills.” Payments are usually due a month before the next semester begins and it’s important to pay on time to avoid hefty late fees. Most parents <strong>pay bills with a check or money order</strong> because colleges charge a 2-3% convenience fee for using a credit card. Some parents also <strong>use low-cost payment plans</strong> to spread college costs over a 10-month period starting as early as May of their child’s senior year of high school. Such plans charge a one-time fee, usually under $100, but no interest.  Most institutions provide a link to available payment plans on their websites under “paying for college.”</p> <p>Most colleges require first-year students living on campus to buy a meal plan. While a few institutions charge a fixed amount for meals, most offer a variety of plans, ranging from 10 to 21 meals per week. Parents need to talk with their child about how many meals they are likely to eat.</p> <h4>Loans</h4> <p>The majority of students and families today borrow to help pay for college. Most financial aid award packages include Federal Direct (also called Stafford) student loans. Federal loans have fixed interest rates that are lower than most private loans, making them a preferable option. Parents who need additional funds can choose from an array of loans offered by the federal government, commercial lenders, state agencies, and some colleges. Because interest rates, repayment terms, and eligibility requirements vary greatly, it is critical to compare different options. The College Board has a <a href="https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/pay-for-college/loans/parent-debt-calculator">parent debt calculator</a> to help families determine how much education debt they can afford.</p> <h4>Student Health Insurance</h4> <p>Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, everyone in the United States is required to have health coverage that qualifies as Minimum Essential Coverage. Students under the age of 26 have several different options, like coverage under a parent’s plan, a private health plan through the Marketplace or a catastrophic health plan. For college students, a lot of universities and colleges around the country offer student health insurance plans as an option for coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Even if you have access to a student health plan through a university, you can still buy a health plan through the Marketplace.</p> <h4>Textbook costs</h4> <p>Textbook expenses vary depending on a student’s major and what courses they end up taking. Students have multiple options for reducing these costs including buying or renting used printed books or using digital books. Because of the high demand for used textbooks, students should buy books as soon as possible after  registering for courses. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Rent-Textbooks/b?ie=UTF8&amp;node=5657188011">Amazon</a> has helpful information about what’s involved with renting books.</p> <h4>On-Campus Jobs</h4> <p>On-campus jobs, including work-study, go fast. Students who want to work on campus should contact their Student Employment Office during the summer and start applying for jobs early. Students should limit their work hours to 15-20 hours a week to have time to keep up with their studies.</p> <p>Parents can take several steps to make this list of tasks easier to manage. First, they can attend parent workshops held in conjunction with their child’s college orientation program. They can also check their child’s college portal frequently for reminders about deadlines, missing documents, valuable campus resources, and upcoming informational events. While it may never make up for the loss of cherished time together during childhood, actively supporting students throughout the summer before college allows parents to ensure the success of one of the most important transitions in their child’s life. </p>
BODYES <p>Hace algunos veranos me estaba preparando para enviar a mi hijo a la universidad. Estaba muy emocionado por verlo iniciar esta nueva etapa en su vida, pero también estaba triste porque ya no compartiríamos nuestras charlas cotidianas o la cena. Al estar lidiando con este torbellino de emociones, los padres no nos damos cuenta que tenemos que ayudar a nuestros hijos a concentrarse en las cosas que deben hacer antes de partir hacia el campus a comienzos del otoño. Como muchas de estas tareas son de índole financiera, el apoyo de los padres es fundamental.  Estos son algunos temas sobre los que debes hablar con tu hijo antes de que comiencen las clases.</p> <h4>Pagar las facturas de la universidad</h4> <p>La mayoría de las universidades ya no envían las factura por correo. En cambio, lo hacen a través de un portal en línea para estudiantes, donde por medio de una conexión segura se envían las facturas uno o dos meses antes del inicio de cada semestre. La información sobre el otorgamiento de ayuda financiera también se encuentra aquí. Ten en cuenta que la factura solo se reducirá si se le ha otorgado ayuda financiera al estudiante. Los estudiantes deben solicitar su préstamo por intermedio de la oficina de ayuda financiera y tratar de obtener becas para trabajo-estudio cuando llegan al campus.</p> <p>Los estudiantes pueden habilitar el acceso a su cuenta para los padres siguiendo las instrucciones que encontrarán en el sitio web de la institución, en las secciones “cuentas de estudiantes” o “pago de facturas”. En general, los pagos vencen un mes antes del inicio del próximo semestre y es importante pagar a tiempo para evitar los cuantiosos cargos por mora. La mayoría de los padres <strong>paga las facturas con un cheque o giro postal</strong> porque las universidades cobran entre un 2% y 3% de recargo por servicio si se paga con tarjeta de crédito. Algunos padres prefieren los<strong> planes de pago de bajo costo</strong>, que dividen los costos en 10 cuotas mensuales que se comienzan a pagar en el mes de mayo mientras se cursa el último año de la escuela secundaria. Este tipo de planes cobra un cargo único de procesamiento, por lo general menor a US$ 100, pero no aplica intereses.  La mayoría de las instituciones incluyen en sus sitios web un enlace a los planes de pagos disponibles. Generalmente en la sección “Pagar la universidad”.</p> <p>La mayoría de las universidades exigen que los estudiantes de primer año que viven en el campus compren un plan de comidas. Si bien algunas instituciones cobran un monto fijo por las comidas, la mayoría ofrece una variedad de planes que incluyen de 10 a 21 comidas por semana. Los padres deben analizar con sus hijos cuántas comidas es probable que tomen.</p> <h4>Préstamos</h4> <p>Actualmente, la mayoría de los estudiantes y de las familias toman préstamos para pagar la universidad. La mayoría de los paquetes de ayuda financiera incluyen los Préstamos Federales Directos, también llamados Préstamos Stafford. Los préstamos federales tienen una tasa de interés fija que es inferior a la ofrecida por la mayoría de los préstamos privados, por lo tanto son la opción más buscada. Los padres que necesitan fondos adicionales pueden elegir entre una variedad de préstamos ofrecidos por el gobierno federal, prestamistas comerciales, agencias estatales y algunas universidades. Debido a las grandes diferencias que existen entre las tasas de interés, condiciones de pago y requisitos, es de vital importancia que comparen las diferentes opciones. El College Board ofrece una <a href="https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/pay-for-college/loans/parent-debt-calculator">calculadora para padres</a> que le permite a las familias hacer una estimación del nivel de endeudamiento que pueden afrontar.</p> <h4>Seguro médico para estudiantes</h4> <p>A partir de la entrada en vigencia de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible, todos los habitantes en los Estados Unidos deben contar con una cobertura médica que se define como Cobertura Esencial Mínima. Los estudiantes menores de 26 años tienen diferentes opciones, como la cobertura dentro del plan de los padres, un plan médico privado del Mercado de Cobertura Médica o un plan de deducible alto (también llamado “plan para catástrofes”). Para los estudiantes de nivel terciario, muchas universidades e instituciones académicas de enseñanza superior ofrecen planes de seguro médico en línea con las directivas de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible. Incluso si tienes acceso a un plan médico para estudiantes con una universidad, puedes adquirir uno en el mercado.</p> <h4>Costo de los libros de texto</h4> <p>Estos gastos varían mucho según la carrera elegida y las materias que se cursen. Los estudiantes cuentan con varias opciones para reducir estos costos, por ejemplo el comprar o alquilar libros usados o usar libros digitales. Debido a la gran demanda de libros de texto usados, se recomienda que los estudiantes compren los libros lo antes posible tras haberse anotado en una clase. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Rent-Textbooks/b?ie=UTF8&amp;node=5657188011">Amazon</a> ofrece información muy útil sobre el proceso de alquiler de libros.</p> <h4>Trabajar en el campus</h4> <p>Los puestos de trabajo en el campus, al igual que las becas para trabajo-estudio, se cubren rápidamente. Los estudiantes que deseen trabajar en el campus deben comunicarse con la Oficina de Empleos para Estudiantes durante el verano y postularse con anticipación. El límite es de 15-20 horas de trabajo semanales para tener tiempo para el estudio. </p> <p>Los padres también pueden tomar algunas medidas para que esta lista de tareas sea mucho más fácil de manejar. En primer lugar, pueden asistir a los talleres para padres que ofrece el programa de orientación de cada universidad. También pueden consultar con frecuencia el portal de la universidad para ver los recordatorios sobre fechas límites, documentación pendiente, recursos útiles en el campus y otros eventos informativos. Si bien nunca podrán recuperar el tiempo perdido durante la infancia de los hijos, apoyar en forma activa a los estudiantes durante el verano antes de comenzar la universidad, le permitirá a los padres garantizar el éxito de una de las transiciones más importantes en la vida de sus hijos. </p>
CATHTML 5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,03C3BA21-5056-9A4B-6C6DDCB7285C3372,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:29.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:09:48.533
DESCRIPTION We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child before they start college.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child before they start college. Learn more.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child before they start college. Learn more.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Paying for College: What You Need to do Now Before Your Teen Starts College in the Fall
LASTUPDATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 1AB462D0-15ED-11E5-959C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2015-06-22 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Paying for College: What You Need to do Now
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Paying for College: What You Need to Do Now
SHORTTITLEES Pagar la universidad
SOCIALTITLE Paying for College: What You Need to do Now
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER While dealing with sadness of sending a child off to college, parents may find it hard to help their student focus on the tasks they need to complete before they leave for campus in the fall. We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child about before they start college.
TEASERES Hace algunos veranos me estaba preparando para enviar a mi hijo a la universidad.
TEASERIMAGE 449B8590-193A-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Paying for College: What You Need to do Now Before Your Teen Starts College in the Fall
TITLEES Pagar la universidad: qué debes saber antes de que tu hijo comience las clases en otoño
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET What you need to know about paying for college - take some tips via @EducationNation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 909D5680-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

university campus

Making an Affordable College Choice

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1Ea5XPc
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Late winter and early spring are both exciting and stressful times in the college planning process. For many parents, excitement about acceptance letters is tempered by concerns about whether they can afford their child’s first-choice college. While scholarships are great resources that can help your teen pay for his education, they may not cover all of the costs involved, and financial aid can be a good option to help you offset some of these expenditures. If you haven’t already applied for financial aid, it’s important that you take action as soon as possible because it may provide you with the funding that you need to afford your child’s college education. UAspire is committed to helping parents find an affordable path to a postsecondary education for their children, and we have a great number of <a href="https://www.uaspire.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/FAFSA-Checklist.Flowchart.Final-Template-2012-2013-school-year.pdf">resources</a> to help you navigate the financial aid process.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=89385520-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318">Find out more about applying for financial aid and managing college costs.</a></p> <p>If you have already submitted your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), a deeper understanding of the financial aid awards your child receives and what you will be responsible for paying is a key step in deciding which college he should attend. Essentially there are two ways families pay for college – with gift aid that does not have to be repaid, or through self-financing, which means funds provided by your family from savings, current income, loans and other sources. </p> <p>Financial aid awards typically consist of three types of aid:</p> <p><strong>- Gift aid</strong> includes grants from the federal and state governments and college funds awarded based on the student’s demonstrated financial need. Scholarships come from colleges and are awarded based on merit such as outstanding academic achievement.</p> <p><strong>- Loans</strong> come from various sources. Most are Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans. Subsidized loans are for students from lower income families; the federal government pays the interest on these loans while the student is in college. Unsubsidized loans are available to all students and require students to pay the interest while in college. </p> <p><strong>- Federal work-study</strong> is money that students have to earn, usually through a job on campus. The student is responsible for finding the job, and colleges do not guarantee a job for every student who receives an award.</p> <p>Making sense of award letters can be challenging. Colleges do not describe the same types of aid using the same terms. Further complicating matters is that the amount of gift aid, loans and work-study differs from one college to another, making it hard to compare awards and determine what the student will actually have to pay at each college. </p> <p>Determining college costs involves subtracting the gift aid the student receives from the direct cost of attendance, which consists of tuition and fees, room and board. Scholarships students receive from their high school or a private organization should also be subtracted. This calculation provides the “net” cost for a student to attend a particular college and makes it easy to compare the direct costs of different colleges. Going a step further and subtracting the loans awarded to students from the net cost results in an estimate of what families will have to pay for their child’s first year. You will also need to budget for books, supplies, transportation and incidentals. You have more control over these costs than the direct costs charged by colleges. You may want to consider having your child attend a college close to home or live at home to limit incidental expenditures and reduce costs.</p> <p>Most colleges bill students twice a year. Half of the balance is due in the summer before they enroll and the balance before the second semester is billed in January.  If you can’t cover what your child owes from your income or savings, you have several options. Colleges offer payment plans that allow parents to spread college costs over ten months, usually beginning in May after the student has committed to enrolling. The federal government and some states also offer parent loans, the interest rates for which can be much lower than other types of loans. In addition, some private lenders offer parent loans. Generally, private loans have higher costs and less flexible repayment terms than those offered by federal and state agencies. In choosing a particular loan, it is important to compare the differences in interest rates, origination fees, and repayment terms. </p> <p>Making an informed financial decision about college will benefit you and your teen.  If you both take time to understand the various options for paying for college and the long-term implications of each one, you can help your teen make a college choice that works for both of you. In doing so, your teen will feel that the college she attends fits her needs and interests, and is a choice that is affordable for the entire family. You will also be allowing her to focus on her studies instead of having to worry about the stresses of paying for college on her own. At the same time, you can rest assured that whatever accommodations you may need to make for your child’s education are reasonable and not unduly burdensome.  In the long term, a carefully considered decision will reduce financial stress on the family and help prevent the possibility of your child leaving college before completing a degree. It will also allow her to get a good start toward achieving her career and life goals, which is priceless.</p> <p><em>Bob Giannino is the Chief Executive Officer of <a href="https://www.uaspire.org/">uAspire</a>, a national leader in providing college affordability services to young people and families. uAspire partners with high schools, community organizations, and colleges to provide advice to more than 10,000 young people and their families every year.</em></p>
BODYES <p>El final del invierno y el comienzo de la primavera es una época emocionante y muy estresante en el proceso de planificación de los estudios universitarios. Para muchos padres, la emoción de recibir la carta de aceptación se ve nublada por su preocupación sobre si podrán pagar la universidad que sea la primera opción de su hijo. Si bien las becas son un excelente recurso que ayuda a pagar la educación de tu hijo, no siempre cubren todos los costos, y la ayuda financiera puede ser una buena opción para ayudarte a cubrir algunos de estos gastos. Si aún no has solicitado ningún tipo de ayuda financiera, es importante que lo hagas cuanto antes porque podría proporcionarte los fondos que necesitas para pagar los estudios universitarios de tu hijo. El compromiso de UAspire es ayudar a los padres a encontrar un camino asequible para la educación terciaria de sus hijos, y contamos con una gran cantidad de recursos para ayudarlos en el proceso de solicitar ayuda financiera. </p> <p><em>Encuentra más información sobre cómo solicitar ayuda financiera y el manejo de los costos.</em> </p> <p>Si ya has presentado la Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes (FAFSA, Free Application for Federal Student Aid), es fundamental que conozcas en profundidad el tipo de ayuda financiera que recibirá tu hijo y qué gastos serán tu responsabilidad para decidir a qué universidad debe asistir tu hijo. Básicamente, existen dos formas en que las familias pagan los estudios universitarios: mediante una subvención que no debe reembolsarse o mediante financiación propia, es decir, fondos provenientes de los ahorros familiares, ingresos actuales, préstamos u otras fuentes. </p> <p>La asistencia financiera suele dividirse en tres tipos:</p> <ul> <li>Subvenciones no reembolsables otorgadas por el gobierno federal y/o estatal y becas universitarias otorgadas según las necesidades financieras comprobadas del estudiante. Las becas otorgadas por las universidades se entregan según el mérito, como por ejemplo, logros académicos sobresalientes.</li> <li>Préstamos que pueden obtenerse de varias fuentes. La mayoría son Préstamos Federales Directos con y sin subsidio. Los préstamos con subsidio se otorgan a los estudiantes de familias de ingresos más bajos. El gobierno federal paga los intereses del préstamo mientras el estudiante asiste a la universidad. Los préstamos sin subsidio están disponibles para todos los estudiantes y estos deben pagar los intereses mientras asisten a la universidad. </li> <li>El Programa Federal de Estudio y Trabajo ofrece puestos de trabajo a los estudiantes, en general en el campus. El estudiante tiene la responsabilidad de buscar un trabajo y las universidades no garantizan un puesto para cada estudiante que participe en este programa.</li> </ul> <p>Comprender las cartas de otorgamiento de becas puede ser todo un desafío. Las universidades no describen el mismo tipo de ayuda usando la misma terminología. Y para complicar más las cosas, el monto de la subvención, préstamo o beca para trabajo-estudio varía de una universidad a otra. De manera que es muy difícil hacer una comparación y poder dilucidar cuánto deberá pagar el estudiante.</p> <p>Para determinar los costos de la universidad debes restar el monto de ayuda financiera que recibe el estudiante al costo directo de asistencia, que está formado por los gastos de matrícula y cargos, alojamiento y comida. También debes restar cualquier beca que reciba el estudiante de su escuela secundaria o de una organización privada. Este cálculo permite conocer el costo “neto”para que el estudiante asista a una universidad en particular y hace más sencillo comparar los costos directos de diferentes instituciones. Si avanzamos un paso más y restamos al costo neto el monto del préstamo estudiantil otorgado, obtendremos un estimado de lo que la familia deberá pagar por el primer año de universidad de su hijo. También deberás contar con un presupuesto para los libros de texto, transporte y contingencias; aunque tendrás mayor control sobre estos gastos que sobre los costos directos que cobran las universidades. También sería prudente evaluar la posibilidad de que tu hijo asista a una universidad más cerca de casa o que siga viviendo en casa para limitar los gastos imprevistos y reducir los costos. </p> <p>La mayoría de las universidades emiten su factura dos veces por año. La mitad del monto debe saldarse durante el verano anterior a la inscripción. El saldo restante se factura en enero y debe cancelarse antes del inicio del segundo semestre. Si no puedes pagar la deuda con tus ingresos o ahorros, tienes varias opciones. Las universidades ofrecen planes de pago que dividen los costos en diez pagos mensuales que, generalmente, comienzan en mayo luego de que el estudiante se ha comprometido a inscribirse. El gobierno federal y algunos estados también ofrecen préstamos para padres, y las tasas de interés pueden llegar a ser mucho menores que las de otros tipos de préstamos. Algunos prestamistas privados también ofrecen préstamos para padres. Por los general, los préstamos privados tienen costos más altos y condiciones de pago menos flexibles que los préstamos ofrecidos por las agencias federales y estatales. Al elegir un préstamo, es importante comparar las tasas de interés, los gastos de emisión y las condiciones de pago. </p> <p>Tomar una decisión informada en temas financieros será beneficioso para todos. Si dedican tiempo a analizar las diferentes opciones que existen para pagar la universidad y las consecuencias a largo plazo que acarrea cada una podrás ayudar a tu hijo a elegir una universidad que se ajuste a las expectativas de ambos. También le permitirá a tu hijo concentrarse en sus estudios en vez de tener que preocuparse por tener que pagar la universidad solo. Al mismo tiempo, tendrás la seguridad de que sin importar la deuda que debas contraer para garantizar la educación de hijo, será razonable y no excesivamente onerosa. En el largo plazo, una decisión analizada con prudencia reducirá la carga financiera sobre la familia y evitará la posibilidad de que tu hijo tenga que abandonar la universidad antes de graduarse. También le permitirá a tu hijo dar el primer paso para poder alcanzar sus metas profesionales, lo cual es invaluable. </p> <p>Bob Giannino es el Director ejecutivo de uAspire, líder nacional en servicios de financiación para jóvenes y familias. uAspire se asocia con las escuelas secundarias, organizaciones comunitarias y universidades para ofrecer asesoramiento a más de 10.000 jóvenes y sus familias cada año.</p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:13.273
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:04:11.383
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Making an Affordable College Choice
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 27661C90-BEBC-11E4-AF9C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2015-03-02 11:30:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Understanding how financial aid works and what your family will be responsible for paying is key to finding an affordable college choice for your teen.
TEASERES El final del invierno y el comienzo de la primavera es una época emocionante y muy estresante en el proceso de planificación de los estudios universitarios.
TEASERIMAGE 71D9C2E0-2436-11E7-BDE80050569A4B6C
TITLE Making an Affordable College Choice
TITLEES Cómo elegir una universidad asequible
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 909D5680-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Budgeting

Make College Costs Manageable for the Entire Family

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1wSJaFK
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Applying to college can be as daunting for parents as it is 12th graders–only for different reasons. While students focus on finding a place with the programs and activities they like, as parents we worry about whether we can afford college. We don’t want to let our children down, but we also must live within our family’s budget. Frequent news about the high cost of college and millions of graduates burdened with debt add to our anxiety.  </p> <p>Not to worry. There are things we can all do to make college costs manageable. At uAspire, a national organization which helps thousands of students every year find ways to pay for college, we have learned that understanding what colleges really cost and how to apply for financial aid can make a huge difference.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=7A63AEE0-20A6-11E3-8EC10050569A5318#simple2">Find out how your teen's high school counselor can help you prepare for college. </a></p> <p>Here are a few key facts:</p> <p>- College costs vary enormously depending on where your child goes and how much financial aid she receives. While a few institutions cost more than $60,000, the average cost is much lower - $18,400 for an in-state student at a public, four-year college, $10,700 at a public, two-year college, and $40,000 at a private, four-year college.</p> <p>- Lots of financial aid is available for students who need help with college costs. Last year, students received a total of $238 billion in aid from the federal and state governments, colleges and universities, and other sources.</p> <p>- Most students actually pay less than the published cost of college. How much less depends on their family’s income and the amount of aid they receive.</p> <p>- Borrowing to pay for college is a good investment as long as your child takes advantage of lower-interest student loans offered by federal and state governments and limits the total amount borrowed. College graduates earn much more than people with only a high school diploma, have better health and more time to spend with their children, and participate more actively in their communities.</p> <p>The most important thing you can do now is to apply for financial aid. Here are the steps you need to take:</p> <p>1. Check the web sites of the colleges to which your child is applying to learn how to apply for financial aid. Look under “Future Students,” “Admissions,” or “Tuition and Fees” for information about what forms you need to complete and the “Priority” deadline for filing these forms. All colleges require students to complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Some private colleges also require the CSS (College Scholarship Service) Profile.</p> <p>2. Plan to file your income tax returns as early in January as possible because the FAFSA and Profile ask for information from these returns.</p> <p>3. Complete the FAFSA online at <a href="http://www.fafsa.gov">www.fafsa.gov</a> and Profile at css.collegeboard.org. List the colleges to which your child is applying in alphabetical order so that college staff won’t know which is your first-choice school. If you need assistance completing the forms, call 1-800-433-3243 for FAFSA help and 305-829-9793 for Profile help. There is no need to pay someone to help you.</p> <p>4. Submit your completed forms before the Priority deadlines. Students who apply after this deadline often receive less financial aid than they would have if they applied before.</p> <p>It’s important that your child applies to one college that is a good financial “fit” with your family income as well as a good match with his academic and social interests. It needs to be a place where he can afford to make up the difference between the money you and he can contribute and what it will cost for him to go. A good financial fit can also be a college where he is a top applicant academically, making him likely to receive a merit scholarship. Keep in mind a recent Gallup poll that found employers care more about a person’s knowledge and job skills than where he graduated from college. </p> <p>It’s good to talk with your child now about how much you can afford to pay toward college expenses each year. This information will help you determine which colleges are affordable options after subtracting the financial aid your child receives. It’s easier to have this conversation now than later.</p> <p>Now also is the time to research and apply for scholarships from private organizations. You can search for scholarships at <a href="http://www.FinAid.org">www.FinAid.org</a>. School guidance offices and public libraries also have information about private scholarships.</p> <p>Taking these steps will go a long way toward making college costs manageable for you and your child. Good luck!</p> <p><em>Bob Giannino is the Chief Executive Officer of </em><a href="https://www.uaspire.org/"><em>uAspire</em></a><em>, a national leader in providing college affordability services to young people and families. uAspire partners with high schools, community organizations, and colleges to provide advice to more than 10,000 young people and their families every year.</em></p>
BODYES <p><span lang="ES">Por diversas razones, postularse para ser admitido en una universidad es tan abrumador para los padres como para los alumnos de 12.º grado. Mientras los estudiantes se dedican a buscar un lugar con los programas y actividades que les gusten, los padres nos preocupamos por la financiación de la educación universitaria.  No queremos decepcionar a nuestros hijos, pero también debemos ceñirnos al presupuesto familiar. Las noticias que nos llegan sobre los altos costos de la universidad y los millones de graduados que acarrean el peso de una deuda se suman a nuestra ansiedad.  </span></p> <p><span lang="ES">Pero no hay que preocuparse. Existen diversas medidas que podemos tomar para que los costos sean más manejables. En uAspire, una organización nacional que ayuda a miles de estudiantes cada año a encontrar formas de pagar sus estudios universitarios, hemos descubierto que conocer el costo real de la universidad y cómo solicitar ayuda financiera puede ser una gran diferencia.</span></p> <p><span lang="ES"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=7A63AEE0-20A6-11E3-8EC10050569A5318#simple2">Conoce cómo el consejero escolar de tu hijo puede ayudarte a prepararte para la universidad.</a></span></p> <p><span lang="ES">Estos son algunos datos clave:</span></p> <ul> <li>Los costos universitarios varían enormemente dependiendo de la institución a la que asista tu hijo y el nivel de asistencia financiera que reciba. Si bien algunas universidades cuestan más de US$ 60,000, el costo promedio es mucho menor: US$ 18,400 por estudiante en una universidad pública estatal para una carrera de cuatro años; US$ 10,700 por estudiante en una universidad pública para una carrera de dos años, y US$ 40,000 en una universidad privada para una carrera de cuatro años.</li> <li>Existe una gran variedad de opciones de ayuda financiera para los estudiantes que la necesitan. El año pasado, se otorgaron US$ 238 mil millones en asistencia del gobierno federal, gobiernos estatales, universidades e instituciones académicas de enseñanza superior, y otras fuentes.</li> <li>La mayoría de los estudiantes en realidad paga menos que el costo publicado. Cuánto menos dependerá de los ingresos familiares y de la cantidad de ayuda que reciban.</li> <li>Tomar un préstamo para pagar la universidad es una buena inversión siempre y cuando tu hijo pueda acceder a los préstamos para estudiantes con baja tasa de interés ofrecidos por el gobierno federal o estatal y limite el monto total solicitado. Los graduados universitarios ganan mejores salarios que las personas que solo cuentan con el título de la escuela secundaria, tienen mejor salud y más tiempo para pasar con sus hijos, y participan en forma más activa en sus comunidades.</li> </ul> <p>Lo más importante que puedes hacer ahora es solicitar ayuda financiera. Estos son los pasos que deberás tomar:</p> <ol> <li>Consulta los sitios web de las universidades a las que se postula tu hijo para buscar información sobre ayuda financiera. Busca en las secciones “Futuros estudiantes”, “Ingreso” o “Matrícula y cargos” la información necesaria sobre los formularios que debes completar y la fecha límite “prioritaria” para presentarlos. Todas las universidades exigen que los estudiantes completen el formulario Free Application for Federal Student Aid, (FAFSA, Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes). Algunas universidades privadas también exigen el perfil College Scholarship Service (CSS, Servicio de Becas Universitarias).</li> <li>Planifica presentar tus declaraciones de impuestos lo antes posible, de preferencia en enero, ya que en los formularios FAFSA y CSS debes incluir información que figura en ellas.</li> <li>Completa el formulario FAFSA en línea en<span class="apple-converted-space"> </span><a href="http://www.fafsa.gov/">www.fafsa.gov</a><span class="apple-converted-space"> </span>y el perfil CSS en css.collegeboard.org. Indica en orden alfabético las universidades a las que se postula tu hijo, para que el personal de la universidad no sepa cuál es tu primera opción. Si necesitas ayuda para completar los formularios, puedes llamar al 1-800-433-3243 (FAFSA) y al  305-829-9793 (CSS). No es necesario pagar a nadie para que te ayude.</li> <li>Envía los formularios completos antes de la fecha límite prioritaria. Los estudiantes que presentan su solicitud pasada esta fecha límite habitualmente reciben menos ayuda financiera que si hubieran hecho la presentación a tiempo.</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p>Es importante que tu hijo se postule a una universidad que esté en sintonía con tus ingresos familiares y que también se ajuste a sus intereses académicos y sociales. Debe ser un lugar donde él pueda cubrir la diferencia entre el dinero que tú y él pueden aportar y lo que costará. Una universidad que se ajuste a tus posibilidades financieras también puede ser aquella en la que tu hijo sea uno de los postulantes de mayor nivel académico, y por eso pueda llegar a recibir una beca al mérito. Una encuesta reciente realizada por Gallup muestra que a los empleadores les importan más los conocimientos y habilidades laborales de una persona que la universidad de la que se graduaron. </p> <p>Es importante que hables con tu hijo sobre cuánto dinero dispones para cubrir los gastos universitarios cada año. Esta información te permitirá seleccionar las universidades que sean una opción asequible después de deducir el monto de ayuda financiera que recibirá tu hijo. Es preferible tener esta conversación ahora y no cuando ya sea tarde.</p> <p>Ahora es el momento también para informarse y postularse para recibir becas de organizaciones privadas. Puedes buscar las becas disponibles en <a href="http://www.finaid.org/">www.FinAid.org</a>. Las oficinas de orientación de las escuelas y las bibliotecas públicas también ofrecen información sobre becas privadas.</p> <p>Seguir estos pasos te será de gran ayuda para que los costos sean mucho más manejables, tanto para ti como para tu hijo. ¡Buena suerte!</p> <p><em>Bob Giannino es el Director ejecutivo de</em><em> </em><a href="https://www.uaspire.org/"><em>uAspire</em></a><em>, líder nacional en servicios de financiación para jóvenes y familias. uAspire se asocia con escuelas secundarias, organizaciones comunitarias y universidades para ofrecer asesoramiento a más de 10,000 jóvenes y sus familias cada año.</em></p> <p> </p>
CATHTML 30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7B4A16-5056-9A4B-6CB315AFE94D0D7D,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:27:58.393
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:00:47.053
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Make College Costs Manageable for the Entire Family
LASTUPDATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 89385520-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68
PTOPIC F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA
PUBLISHDATE 2014-12-08 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Applying to college can be as daunting for parents as it is for 12th graders–only for different reasons. While students focus on finding a place with the programs and activities they like, as parents we worry about whether we can afford college. We don’t want to let our children down, but we also must live within our family’s budget. Not to worry. There are things we can all do to make college costs manageable.
TEASERES Por diversas razones, postularse para ser admitido en una universidad es tan abrumador para los padres como para los alumnos de 12.º grado.
TEASERIMAGE E70627B0-1FC8-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE Make College Costs Manageable for the Entire Family
TITLEES Costos universitarios más manejables para toda la familia
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 909D5680-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

College and Career

There’s perhaps no bigger change than graduating high school. No matter the path, there are still ways to support your child’s journey to adulthood.

4-Year College

This section has helpful tips on applying to colleges, receiving financial aid, selecting a major, preparing for the first year, and more.

Career Basics

Learn more about the many career and technical programs available to your child as they transition from high school to the next phase of their life.

Recommended

Guy in Library

Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College? How to Know

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>There are a variety of ways in which teens can be <a href="/benchmarks/what-if-my-teen-is-not-ready-for-college"><em>college-ready</em>;</a> and many ways they might not be. They may have perfect grades, but cannot do their own laundry. They may have all the confidence in the world, but struggle to write an essay. Certain <a href="/advice-lists/8-life-skills-your-teen-needs-before-moving-out">life skills</a> are extremely important for your teen to have before living on their own, but to succeed in college, your teen needs to be academically ready to take on the demanding coursework. According to the <a href="http://cscsr.org/Journal.html">Journal of College Retention</a> from the Center for the Study of College Student Retention, only 50% of students who enter higher education actually earn a bachelor’s degree. Ensuring that your student is academically prepared is the first step toward the ultimate goal of seeing them start and complete their college education. Here’s what your teen needs in order to be academically prepared for college:</p>
BODYES <p>Existen diversas maneras en que los adolescentes pueden estar <a href="/benchmarks/what-if-my-teen-is-not-ready-for-college">preparados para la universidad</a>; y muchas maneras en las que podrían no estarlo. Es posible que tengan calificaciones perfectas, pero no sepan lavarse la ropa. Es posible que tengan toda la confianza del mundo, pero que tengan dificultades para escribir un ensayo. Hay determinadas <a href="/advice-lists/8-life-skills-your-teen-needs-before-moving-out">habilidades de la vida</a> que es muy importante que tu hijo tenga antes de vivir solo, pero para tener éxito en la universidad, tu hijo necesita estar académicamente preparado para hacer frente a un exigente programa de estudios.  Según el  <a href="http://cscsr.org/Journal.html">Journal of College Retention</a> del Centro para el Estudio de Retención de Estudiantes Universitarios, solo el 50% de los estudiantes que ingresan en el sistema de educación superior obtienen, en efecto, un título de cuatro años. Asegurarte de que tu hijo esté académicamente preparado es el primer paso hacia la meta máxima de verlo comenzar y terminar su educación universitaria. A continuación se indica lo que tu hijo necesita para estar académicamente preparado para la universidad:</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45FAA2F-5056-9A4B-6CEE346B20D7951A,F46095CF-5056-9A4B-6C8ACFDFB72EAE6E,2B652CD7-5056-9A4B-6C50422D2FDBFE56,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD
CREATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-04 18:07:50.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-07-28 09:49:42.153
DESCRIPTION Ensuring that your student is academically prepared is the first step toward the ultimate goal of seeing them start and complete their college education.
DESCRIPTIONES Existen diversas maneras en que los adolescentes pueden estar preparados para la universidad.
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit on how to tell if your child is ready to take on college academics:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Here’s how to tell.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College? How to Know
LASTUPDATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 23331550-1983-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-04 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College?
SEOTITLEES ¿Está mi hijo académicamente preparado para la universidad?
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES ¿Está mi hijo académicamente preparado para la universidad?
SOCIALTITLE Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College?
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER There are a variety of ways in which teens can be college-ready; and many ways they might not be.
TEASERES Existen diversas maneras en que los adolescentes pueden estar preparados para la universidad; y muchas maneras en las que podrían no estarlo.
TEASERIMAGE A6E36320-204D-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College? How to Know
TITLEES ¿Está mi hijo académicamente preparado para la universidad? Cómo averiguarlo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Is your teen ready for the rigor of college academics? This guide will help you tell (via @EducationNation)
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceTipSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAdviceTipItems
array
1 4444DA70-1984-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
2 51685920-1984-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
3 34008050-1FB1-11E7-80C10050569A4B6C
4 7BAB2280-1984-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
5 17FE5C60-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
6 2BD3E020-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
7 40C6E1D0-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
8 4A55EF20-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
9 5C91E720-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
10 6A5C0610-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
11 7B1D6C00-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
12 93E2D270-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
13 0CCF3070-1981-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
aFiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 F89E37B0-220B-11E3-A33B0050569A5318
2 7F360C40-220B-11E3-A4E40050569A5318
3 B757E830-2A87-11E3-823F0050569A5318
4 C60D4D00-249E-11E3-AD580050569A5318

guy laptop

Have a Kid Going to College? Your Top Three Questions Answered

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>When your teen starts college, you will likely have hundreds of questions running through your mind. Even though you have always known what is best for your child, this time is challenging and constantly changing. There are many different ways to support your student once they are in college and there is value in any kind of support you provide, whether it’s financial, emotional or other forms. There is not going to be a perfect answer for every one of your questions, but here is some guidance on how to answer three questions that almost all parents have at some point. </p>
BODYES <p>Si bien siempre has sabido reconocer qué era lo mejor para tu hijo, esta vez estás frente a un desafío que se modifica constantemente. Hay diferentes maneras de apoyarlos cuando ingresan a la universidad y todo lo que hagas para ayudarlos tiene un enorme valor, ya sea en el aspecto económico, apoyándolos emocionalmente o de cualquier otro modo. No existe una respuesta perfecta para cada una de tus preguntas, pero aquí encontrarás una guía que ayudará a responder las tres preguntas que todos los padres se hacen tarde o temprano. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CMLABEL Have a Kid Going to College? Your Top Three Questions Answered
CREATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-29 16:29:00.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:07.04
DESCRIPTION There are many different ways to support your student once they are in college, whether it’s financial, emotional, academically or with communication.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Check out these three questions about College Freshmen that almost all parents have at some point.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Check out these three questions about College Freshmen that almost all parents have at some point.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Have a Kid Going to College? Your Top Three Questions Answered
LASTUPDATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 573062A0-14BE-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-29 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Top 3 Questions for Parents of College Freshmen
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES ¿Tu hijo va a comenzar la universidad?
SOCIALTITLE Top 3 Questions for Parents of College Freshmen
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER There is not going to be a perfect answer for every one of your questions, but here is some guidance.
TEASERES No existe una respuesta perfecta para cada una de tus preguntas, pero aquí encontrarás una guía.
TEASERIMAGE 8B3182C0-22CC-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE Have a Kid Going to College? Your Top Three Questions Answered
TITLEES ¿Tu hijo va a comenzar la universidad? Las respuestas a las tres preguntas más importantes
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Check out these three questions about College Freshmen that almost all parents have at some point.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 4BD0F030-14C0-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
2 01F8DDA0-14C1-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
3 24A2EB70-14C1-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
4 F2A9DF60-13EF-11E7-9E040050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Family of three

Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” While this is nothing to be ashamed about—in fact sharing real-life experiences can provide really important wisdom to your kids—the world looks different today than it did when you were in college. In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted. Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.</p>
BODYES <p>Como padre, probablemente hayas comenzado una oración diciendo: “Cuando yo estudiaba…” Si bien no es nada de lo debas avergonzarte —de hecho compartir experiencias de la vida real puede aportarles sabiduría importante a tus hijos— el mundo es diferente hoy de lo que era <em>cuando</em> <em>tú estabas en la universidad</em>. En realidad, todo el enfoque hacia la vida, el trabajo y el amor ha sufrido un cambio drástico para los adultos jóvenes. A continuación se tratan algunos cambios importantes para tener en cuenta mientras tu hijo adolescente parte hacia la universidad. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CMLABEL Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-31 17:35:32.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:05.713
DESCRIPTION As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about the important changes to recognize about the current college scene:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID F6F12A30-1659-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-31 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Why College Is Not the Same as It Used to Be
SEOTITLEES La universidad no es lo mismo que cuando yo estudiaba
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted.
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted.
TEASERES En realidad, todo el enfoque hacia la vida, el trabajo y el amor ha sufrido un cambio drástico para los adultos jóvenes.
TEASERIMAGE 32BFD5F0-2151-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
TITLEES Por qué la universidad no es lo mismo que cuando yo estudiaba
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college (via @EducationNation)
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 E7617100-165A-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
2 8C7BAD40-165B-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
3 23331550-1983-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
4 CFDC0F30-165B-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
5 15C19560-165C-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
6 4B660930-165C-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
7 0617E400-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 31FB78E0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
2 42715070-2A8B-11E3-823F0050569A5318
3 A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Difficult Studying

Avoiding “Summer Melt” and Supporting Low-Income Students the Summer Before College

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Students who do not have a lot of support or information on the transition to college may find the summer after high school extremely difficult to navigate, as there are many important steps that need to be taken. According to <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12032/pdf">research</a> by Benjamin L. Castleman and Lindsay C. Page, co-authors of <em>Summer Melt</em>, as many as one in five high school graduates who have been accepted and intend to enroll in college don’t arrive on campus in the fall.  This is referred to as “<a href="http://sdp.cepr.harvard.edu/files/cepr-sdp/files/sdp-summer-melt-handbook.pdf">summer melt</a>” as these eligible students, most of whom are low-income minority students, “melt” away, often due to challenges they weren’t expecting.</p> <p>“The summer before college is the epitome of a broader pattern on the road to college, of students encountering consequential but complex decisions,” says Castleman, an Assistant Professor of Education and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. “This time can set students up for success, or a lack of resources can greatly impact their ability to get where they want to go.” The following tips will help students (and their parents) navigate the summer months.</p>
BODYES <p>Los estudiantes que no cuentan con mucha ayuda o información sobre la transición hacia los estudios universitarios suelen pasar el verano después de haber terminado la secundaria sumidos en la confusión debido a la gran cantidad de cosas que deben hacer. Según una <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ssqu.12032/pdf">investigación</a> realizada por Benjamin L. Castleman y Lindsay C. Page, autores de <em>Summer Melt</em>, uno de cada cinco graduados de escuela secundaria que han sido aceptados y tienen intención de inscribirse en una universidad no llegarán al campus en el otoño. Este fenómeno es conocido como <a href="http://sdp.cepr.harvard.edu/files/cepr-sdp/files/sdp-summer-melt-handbook.pdf"><em>summer melt</em> (el abatimiento del verano)</a>. Estos estudiantes, la mayoría de los cuales pertenecen a minorías de bajos ingresos, se sienten abatidos a causa de los desafíos y situaciones inesperadas que deben enfrentar.</p> <p>“El verano anterior al inicio de la universidad es el paradigma de un patrón mucho más amplio de estudiantes que deben tomar decisiones importantes y complejas”, explica Castleman,  Profesor adjunto de Educación y Políticas Públicas en la Universidad de Virginia. “Este es el momento que puede definir el éxito de un estudiante, o la falta de recursos puede afectar enormemente las posibilidades de ir adonde desean”. Estos consejos ayudarán a los estudiantes, y a los padres, a transitar los meses de verano.</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,D5F6B7DF-5056-9A4B-6C699B6504C9150C,03C3BA21-5056-9A4B-6C6DDCB7285C3372,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,D5F90F44-5056-9A4B-6C44B22B3F31A752,D5FE4D80-5056-9A4B-6C624C8936E99A85
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-30 16:46:52.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:36:35.92
DESCRIPTION One in five students who've been accepted & intend to enroll in college don’t arrive on campus in the fall. Here are tips on how to avoid "Summer Melt"
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about avoiding “Summer Melt” and supporting low-income students the summer before college:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT One in five high school graduates who've been accepted & intend to enroll in college don’t arrive on campus in the fall. This is referred to as “summer melt.”
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Avoiding “Summer Melt” and Supporting Low-Income Students the Summer Before College
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID FF913A20-1589-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-30 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Avoiding “Summer Melt”
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Supporting Low-Income Students the Summer Before College
SHORTTITLEES Cómo evitar el “Summer Melt”
SOCIALTITLE Avoiding “Summer Melt” and Supporting Low-Income Students
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER As many as one in five high school graduates who have been accepted and intend to enroll in college don’t arrive on campus in the fall.
TEASERES Uno de cada cinco graduados de escuela secundaria que han sido aceptados y tienen intención de inscribirse en una universidad no llegarán al campus en el otoño.
TEASERIMAGE EB9D5A40-2050-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE Avoiding “Summer Melt” and Supporting Low-Income Students the Summer Before College
TITLEES Cómo evitar el “Summer Melt” y ayudar a los estudiantes de bajos ingresos durante el verano anterior al inicio de la universidad
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET 1 in 5 high school graduates who've been accepted & intend to enroll in college don’t arrive on campus. #SummerMelt
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceTipSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAdviceTipItems
array
1 EABFDF50-158B-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
2 0D714020-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
3 25A2F210-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
4 5206EDC0-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
5 857C2580-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
6 F2A9DF60-13EF-11E7-9E040050569A4B6C
7 9884BC50-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
8 BBAAB0E0-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
9 DFB2C810-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
10 608F46F0-14B8-11E7-A1300050569A4B6C
11 F8EA5140-158C-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
12 14E9AD00-158D-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
13 F7E62BF0-14C1-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
14 6229FB60-158D-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
15 6BA3ABF0-158D-11E7-A85A0050569A4B6C
aFiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 57A1A1F0-1EF9-11E7-B1EF0050569A4B6C

Teen Going to College

Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>You may have high hopes for this time to be special; a last chance for you and your teen to bond before they leave. But the reality may not meet all of your expectations. Your teen is likely having just as difficult a time as you processing all of the change. We talked to our <a href="/about/experts/youth-advisors">youth advisors</a> to see if they and their parents thought they were ready to graduate high school. Here are some of their answers, as well as some perspective to keep in mind to help the transition go a lot more smoothly.</p>
BODYES <p>Es posible que tengas grandes esperanzas de que este momento sea especial; una última oportunidad para que tú y tu hijo estrechen los lazos afectivos antes de su partida. Pero es posible que la realidad no cumpla con todas tus expectativas. Probablemente sea tan difícil para tu hijo adolescente procesar todo el cambio como lo es para ti. Hablamos con nuestros <a href="/about/experts/youth-advisors">asesores de jóvenes</a> para que nos cuenten si los estudiantes y sus padres pensaban que estaban preparados para graduarse de la escuela secundaria. A continuación se incluyen algunas de sus respuestas, así como ciertas perspectivas para tener en cuenta para contribuir a que la transición sea más sencilla.</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CMLABEL Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months
CREATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-29 17:14:40.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 17:05:47.707
DESCRIPTION How to make the most of the time between high school graduation and your teen leaving the nest.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in these three ways the make the most of the summer before college with your teen.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT We talked to our youth advisors to see if they and their parents thought they were ready to graduate high school. Here are some of their answers.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months
LASTUPDATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID B85456D0-14C4-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-29 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Three Ways to Make the Most of the Summer Before College
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall
SHORTTITLEES Cómo aprovechar al máximo los próximos tres meses
SOCIALTITLE Three Ways to Make the Most of the Summer Before College
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER The time between high school graduation and leaving the nest is often precious, emotional, and downright scary for both teens and parents.
TEASERES El tiempo entre la graduación de la escuela secundaria y el abandono del nido suele ser valioso, emocional y totalmente atemorizador tanto para los hijos.
TEASERIMAGE 700613F0-17B7-11E7-B45F0050569A4B6C
TITLE Your Teen Is Going To College in the Fall…How to Make the Most of the Next Three Months
TITLEES Tu hijo irá a la universidad en el otoño... Cómo aprovechar al máximo los próximos tres meses
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Check out these 3 ways to make the most of the summer before college.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 2F0D40C1-14C5-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
2 528B4060-14C5-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
3 AF9EF100-1940-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
4 819332F0-14C5-11E7-96810050569A4B6C
5 0617E400-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 4CDA89D0-1EF9-11E7-B1EF0050569A4B6C

Featured Experts