Looking for Middle School?

Looking for Life After High School?

High School

High schoolers are on their way to becoming independent adults and must adopt the responsibilities that go along with these changes. Your support is still as important as ever.

Academics

Even if you don’t remember what you were learning in high school, you can still support your teen’s academic achievement.

Math

Math is a challenging subject for many students, but it doesn’t have to be. Discover practical uses for math, study strategies and more to improve your teen’s math skills.

English Language Arts

There are lots of creative ways to improve your teen’s reading and writing skills. Dig into these helpful strategies below.

Recommended

Grumpy Teen and Mom

Handling High School

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2bBC1Wy
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/2c0g96E
BODY <p>Not sure how to handle your teen headed to high school? This video has some advice to get you through it. </p>
BODYES <p>&iquest;No est&aacute; seguro qu&eacute; hacer con su hijo que va en camino a la escuela secundaria? Este v&iacute;deo tiene algunos consejos para ayudarle a superar este periodo de tiempo.</p>
CATHTML 5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2016-08-09 14:29:01.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:51.26
DESCRIPTION Parent Toolkit's experts reveal how parents and teens can smoothly navigate the challenging transition to high school.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this Parent Toolkit video on how parents and teens can best handle the emotional transition to high school.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/178226501?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/178234036?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" height="360" width="640" frameBorder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/178226501
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/178234036
FACEBOOKTEXT Not sure how to handle your teen headed to high school? Watch the Transition Time video series on ParentToolkit.com and get some advice to get you through it.
FACEBOOKTEXTES ¿No está seguro qué hacer con su hijo que va en camino a la escuela secundaria? Este vídeo tiene algunos consejos para ayudarle a superar este periodo de tiempo.
LABEL Handling High School
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 23E23470-5E5F-11E6-BA320050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
PUBLISHDATE 2016-08-09 14:29:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Handle Your Teen Heading Off to High School
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Handling High School
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE How to Handle Your Teen Heading Off to High School
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Not sure how to handle your teen headed to high school? Watch the Transition Time video series on ParentToolkit.com and get some advice to get you through it.
TEASERES ¿No está seguro qué hacer con su hijo que va en camino a la escuela secundaria? Este vídeo tiene algunos consejos para ayudarle a superar este periodo de tiempo.
TEASERIMAGE 7F877160-18CB-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Handling High School
TITLEES Afrontar la Escuela Secundaria
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES ¿No está seguro qué hacer con su hijo que va en camino a la escuela secundaria? Este vídeo tiene algunos consejos para ayudarle a superar este periodo de tiempo.
TWITTERTWEET Not sure how to handle your teen heading off to high school? This @EducationNation video will help you through it.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 42715070-2A8B-11E3-823F0050569A5318
2 9045B060-5484-11E4-ADC90050569A5318

Kid with parents

Guiding Our Children Through Transitions: High School

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/Y4Ahd3
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>So you have a high school student. You sit in the roller coaster car as you climb the incline of freshman year, sophomore year, then begin the crazy roller coaster into junior year and, ultimately, arrive at the end, senior year. These next four years will fly by, so hang on.</p> <p>I love high school students. For the most part, their arrival at high school ends the drama of middle school. You can talk to high school students; they can be reasoned with and they can see logic, even though they still may think they’re all that. Walking through the doors of high school, students get that sense of “Wow! Everything counts, this is all serious stuff.” And it really is. It’s the first time they have to think about graduation requirements, building a transcript and the importance of performing well. They begin thinking about what they want to do post-secondary. This is heading into real life. They do all this while balancing an extra-curricular life and a social life. Balancing the various segments of life is part of being a successful high student.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=67061440-9D6B-11E3-857E0050569A5318">RELATED: Check out what your child will be learning this year in school.</a></p> <p>For parents, the apron strings are pretty much frayed to the last thread by the end of senior year. Kids become vastly more independent. They may start driving, dating, and working at their first jobs. Family time wanes as their teenage lives begin to travel at warp speed. They are hurtling toward their future, and all we can do as parents is hang on for dear life.</p> <p>Here’s our survival checklist:</p> <p><strong>• Be involved.</strong> Most high schools offer parent meetings for incoming freshmen. It’s a great idea to attend and learn as much as you can. For sure, your child isn’t going to tell you! Attend parent-teacher conferences and find out information about the curriculum and assignments. Get registered for the parent portal of the student management system, and stay abreast of your child’s performance in each class. Contact teachers or the school counselor if you have questions. Don’t assume that, now that your child is in high school, s/he can handle things on their own. Your monitoring will serve to keep them on track and aware that you are checking! Join the parent association and learn what’s going on at school. Attend events or offer to volunteer for a committee. You want to be connected to the school to really know what’s going on because, once again, your child is not likely to tell you!</p> <p><strong>• Course selection: listen to the experts.</strong> Successful course selection includes completing state or district’s graduation requirements and taking courses that match ability level. It’s critical to pay attention to any teacher recommendations for course levels. I’ve rarely seen a teacher get it wrong in their recommendation for a student. They work with their students day in and day out and they know how that student learns, completes work, and performs on tests. I’ve heard many parents say, “but I know Johnny can do this” when contemplating a certain course level. My immediate response is always the same. “I agree that Johnny can do this, but will he?” That’s the million dollar question. Parents need to be realistic, yet supportive, about their kids. You’ve been watching this child for 14 years now. Habits are pretty well-established. It’s rare that kids make a total turn-around once in high school. Talk to the previous teacher, talk with the school counselor, and look at past grades and habits. Then choose courses that will stretch your child a bit, but remember that they aren’t Gumby. We want kids to feel challenged, but not overwhelmed and drowning.</p> <p><strong>• Help with the balancing act between academics, athletics, and social life.</strong> We want our children to be successful students, to feel connected to their school, and to have friends and activities for fun times, but it all has to be carefully balanced. First, school is their job and what should be a student’s priority. Class choice and grades will play a big part in determining post-secondary options. It’s even more critical to have a set time and non-distractible place to study and do homework. Let me say one thing about homework; some schools no longer count homework for a grade. Kids say “it doesn’t count, so why do it?” That thought gets them into hot water. Homework is practice of the skills and concepts taught during class. It’s much more prudent to say, “I don’t get it” on a homework paper, knowing you can ask the teacher to clarify the next day, than to say “I don’t get it” on a test or quiz. Whether it counts or not, insist that your child does the homework. After all, practice makes perfect.</p> <p>If your child is involved in athletics, clubs, or other activities, seriously consider the time commitment required. A study hall during a sports season can turn out to be a godsend. It may be that you and your family may need to alter patterns to balance study time with the activity. Pay attention to those things up front, not when things have fallen into crisis mode.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/140095043" width="600" height="337" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Be a parent, not a pal.</strong> High school comes with all kinds of social events; spectator games, dances, and proms. There will be parties, movies, and just hanging out. Set reasonable expectations regarding how many nights you want your child out and time of curfew. Monitor who they are with and where they are going, as well as what they are doing. You will be labeled “over-protective” but that’s ok. Be a parent, not a pal. Each year in the fall and spring, I drive into the parking lot of my high school and see signs that say, “Those Who Host Lose The Most.” Those signs are for those parents who want to be the “cool” parents. These are the parents who serve alcohol at parties and/or are non-present with regard to supervision. Some defend their actions by saying they take the keys, or they trust their children. Let’s get real here, folks. Providing alcohol for minors, regardless of whether or not you take the keys, is against the law in most states. Get caught and you’re in a pickle. The liability alone is staggering. I’ve never heard a parent say, “well, I got the permission of each child’s parent to give them alcohol at the party.” That’s because most parents would say “no way.” And, you trust your child? Seriously? You trust a 14, 15, 16, or 17 year old?? Hey, I’ve got some swell swamp land for sale that I’d like you to see. What a bargain.</p> <p>Here’s a true story. My kids knew I would always call parents whenever they wanted to go to a party or do something with other kids. I wanted to know for sure about the supervision. My ego was perfectly intact knowing I wasn’t the “cool” mom. So, one day my son asked to go to a party. I told him I’d call the parent, and would let him know. I’m sure I got the eye roll, but he didn’t say a word. I called the hostess of the party and asked if she would be present for the entire party. I heard her suck her breath in a little, and she said, “well!! I trust my children!” I persisted until I got the answer I was looking for. Yes, she and her husband would be present for the party. My son went to the party and, when I picked him up after, I found him out on the lawn playing a game with some guys. As we drove home, I asked how the party was; I got a “good” as an answer. I pushed a little and asked why he was outside instead of inside. He was quiet for a minute and then he blurted it out, “Mom, someone had a knife at the party, so I got out of there.” Swallowing the bile that rose in my throat, I calmly praised him for having the sense to remove himself from that situation. Then I asked where the parents were. They were upstairs all night. He told me details of kids throwing food, cans of soda, and just being disrespectful of another person’s home.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=C24B6250-1288-11E4-98390050569A5318">RELATED: How to talk to kids about drugs.</a></p> <p>Yeah, I wasn’t the “cool” mom, but I sure was the mom. Setting firm boundaries and expectations, demanding respect and courtesy, and allowing natural consequences for screw-ups will actually be appreciated by your kids. These types of parameters show that you care and you value your child’s health, safety and welfare. They might be mad, but it won’t last long, trust me. And if it does, just wait until they have kids of their own. You’ll be the smartest person on the planet.</p> <p><strong>• Seek knowledge, listen and learn about post-secondary planning. Don’t be afraid to seek the help of experts.</strong> The ultimate goal of parents is to launch their children into a career that will sustain them and keep them from moving back home. Seriously, we all want our kids to be successful, be in a career that they love, and earn enough money to be totally independent. There are many options for students after graduation. It’s important to be supportive of their dreams, but also realistic. Here are a few tips:</p> <p>1. With the assistance of your school counselor, map out a five year (four years of high school and the first year of post-secondary) plan of coursework that leads to the dream post-secondary option of your child. Having that “road map” can help your child be realistic about plans, and can also serve to motivate them to do well. It’s not set in stone; adjustments are expected every year as course offerings or goals change. But having that map ensures that requirements will be met, and planning is on course. It also serves as a valuable reality check as they evaluate courses, grades and goals.</p> <p>2. Encourage your child to look for job shadowing opportunities in fields of interest. These opportunities offer students valuable connections to people in the field. Those professionals can talk about necessary coursework and training, grades needed for programs, characteristics for being successful on the job, what they like/dislike about their job, starting salary and working conditions. Kids will walk away from career shadowing feeling one of two ways: 1) I loved this and really want to pursue it, or 2) it was fun but no thanks! Both of those are critical pieces of information. It’s a valuable taste of reality from an expert in the field, and you aren’t put in a position of being told you don’t know anything. Plus, it very well could save your child’s college education from being the most expensive career exploration program you or s/he ever paid for!</p> <p>3. <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=0D907DC0-20A6-11E3-8EC10050569A5318#simple2">Talk with your school counselor about post-secondary planning</a>. Learn the timelines, familiarize yourself with online programs that offer college and career searches, attend the meetings on financial aid. Don’t wait for your child to bring that information home; you go and do your own homework and get knowledgeable. Your school counselor can guide you on what programs might be best for your child’s dreams. They know which tests are required for entrance, and the best times to take them. School counselors are fabulous guides through the post-secondary planning process. They are your ultimate resource and their services are free.</p> <p><strong>• If you discover that your child is struggling academically, socially, emotionally, or with substance abuse or other serious issues, get help fast.</strong> With increased independence comes temptations, and there are plenty out there. It’s critical to be observant of your child and of their friends. Keep track of academic progress. Notice changes in behavior. Don’t try to explain things away. Be honest. Too many parents try to hide their child’s struggles. They are fairly quick about notifying the school about academic problems, but not about the other types of challenges. It’s not anything to be embarrassed about if your child runs into challenges; it doesn’t mean you’re not a good parent. It means your child is struggling and help is needed. They may be drowning but remember that you have valuable personnel around you who hold a life vest. Collaborate with your school counselor; let them provide suggestions for assistance, run interference with the academic side of things, be an objective sounding board for both you and your child, be the link between outside professionals and the schools. At these times, parents need someone in their corner who can think objectively and unemotionally. School counselors are not there to judge; they are there to support you through a trying time. As I’ve talked with parents who are at their wits’ ends, I’ll offer to take the lead on school while they deal with things at home. Just knowing they don’t have to handle everything can be a great relief to a family. Keep us in the loop, and let us help.</p> <p>I could write for hours about high school but, hopefully, these tips will help you stay connected and informed through to graduation. These next four years will fly by, and then it’s time for the next transition…</p> <p><em>This piece is part of a series examining how parents can help children through school transitions. Check out some of the other posts about <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=70BF09F0-135A-11E4-98390050569A5318">starting elementary school</a>, <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=11D8DA50-1360-11E4-98390050569A5318">transitioning to middle school</a> and <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A0A0E0C0-1365-11E4-98390050569A5318">sending kids off to college</a>.</em></p>
BODYES <p>Ya tienes un estudiante de secundaria. Te sientas en un carro de la montaña rusa y comienza la subida lenta en el ingreso a primer año, después segundo año, luego empiezan las vueltas alocadas de la montaña rusa hacia el tercer año y, finalmente, llega el último. Estos cuatro años pasarán volando, así que sujétate fuerte.</p> <p>Amo a los estudiantes de escuela secundaria. Principalmente porque su llegada pone fin al drama de la escuela intermedia. Puedes hablar, razonar con ellos y pueden ver la lógica de las cosas aunque sigan pensando que ya entienden todo. Al entrar por primera vez, los estudiantes comparten esa sensación de “¡Guau! Todo es importante, esto es serio realmente”. Y en verdad lo es. Es la primera vez que tienen que ponerse a pensar en los detalles de la graduación, un buen certificado analítico y la importancia de tener un alto rendimiento. Comienzan a pensar en lo que querrán hacer después de la secundaria. Esto los dirige hacia la vida real. Hacen todo esto mientras llevan una vida extracurricular y social. Por eso, para ser un estudiante de secundaria exitoso necesitará equilibrar los distintos aspectos de su vida.</p> <p>Para los padres, los lazos que los unen a sus hijos pueden estar muy delgados hacia el final del último año. Los muchachos son cada vez más independientes. A veces, comienzan a manejar, tener citas y conseguir sus primeros trabajos. El tiempo en familia empieza a reducirse mientras la vida del adolescente viaja a velocidades altísimas. Se están lanzando hacia su futuro, y lo único que podemos hacer como padres es esperar lo mejor para sus vidas.</p> <p>Aquí tienes una lista de supervivencia:</p> <p><strong>• Involúcrate.</strong> Casi todas las escuelas secundarias organizan reuniones para padres de estudiantes de primer año. Es una muy buena idea asistir y aprender todo lo que puedas. No tengas dudas de que tu hijo no te va a mantener al tanto. Asiste a charlas entre padres y maestros, y busca información de programas de estudios y asignaciones. Regístrate en el portal del sistema de administración, y mantente informado sobre el rendimiento de tu hijo en cada clase. Contacta a los maestros o al consejero estudiantil si tienes alguna pregunta. No supongas que, ahora que tu hijo está en la secundaria, puede resolver todo por sí solo. ¡Tu supervisión servirá para mantenerlo en el camino correcto y para que sepa que estás presente! Únete a la asociación de padres y entérate de lo que esté ocurriendo en la escuela. Asiste a eventos u ofrécete como voluntario en una comisión de la escuela. Debes estar conectado con la escuela para saber cómo va todo porque, una vez más, ¡es muy probable que tu hijo no te lo cuente!</p> <p><strong>• Elegir los cursos: escucha a los expertos.</strong> Una buena elección de cursos requiere cumplir con los requisitos de graduación del estado y del distrito, y tomar clases que se ajusten a sus habilidades. Es fundamental prestar atención a las recomendaciones de los maestros acerca de los niveles de los cursos. Es muy poco probable que un maestro se equivoque al recomendarle algo a un estudiante. Ellos trabajan con los estudiantes día tras día y saben cómo aprenden, completan las tareas y rinden en las evaluaciones. He escuchado a muchos padres decir: “pero yo sé que Johnny puede hacer esto” a la hora de evaluar un determinado nivel de curso. Mi respuesta inmediata es siempre la misma. “Coincido en que Johnny lo puede hacer, pero ¿lo hará?”. Esa es la pregunta del millón de dólares. Es necesario que los padres sean realistas y, al mismo tiempo, contenedores con sus hijos. Has estado observando a este niño por 14 años. Los hábitos están bien establecidos. Es poco probable que haga un cambio total en la escuela secundaria. Habla con el maestro anterior, con el consejero estudiantil y analiza los grados anteriores y sus hábitos. Recién ahí elige una especialización que extienda sus conocimientos, pero no te olvides que no son Gumby. Queremos que los niños enfrenten desafíos, pero que no se sientan abrumados y sofocados.</p> <p><strong>• Ayúdalo a equilibrar su vida académica, deportiva y social.</strong> Queremos que nuestros hijos sean estudiantes exitosos, tengan una conexión con la escuela, hagan amigos y actividades para divertirse, pero todo en su justa medida. Primero, la escuela es su trabajo y debería ser su prioridad. La elección de las clases y las notas serán fundamentales a la hora de seleccionar opciones después de la secundaria. Aún más importante es tener un horario y lugar establecidos para estudiar y hacer la tarea sin distracciones. Te diré una cosa sobre las tareas; algunas escuelas ya no evalúan las tareas con una calificación. Los niños dicen: “no la tienen en cuenta, ¿para qué la voy a hacer?”. Ese pensamiento les traerá problemas. La tarea les permite practicar las habilidades y conceptos enseñados en clase. Es mucho más prudente decir: “no lo entiendo” en una hoja de la tarea, y así podrá pedirle a la maestra que se lo explique al día siguiente, que decir “no lo entiendo” en una prueba o cuestionario. Sin importar si la tarea es evaluada o no, insiste para que tu hijo la haga. Después de todo, la práctica hace la perfección.</p> <p>Si tu hijo practica deportes, va a clubes o hace otras actividades, ten en cuenta el tiempo que le llevan. Un salón de estudios durante una temporada deportiva puede convertirse en una bendición. Puede ocurrir que tú y tu familia necesiten modificar patrones para equilibrar el tiempo de estudio con las actividades. Presta atención a todas estas cosas desde un comienzo, no cuando la crisis ya esté instalada.</p> <p><strong>• Sé su padre, no un amigo.</strong> La escuela secundaria está rodeada de todo tipo de eventos sociales: juegos, bailes y fiestas de graduación. Habrá fiestas, cine y paseos. Establece expectativas razonables sobre cuántas noches quieres que tu hijo salga, y una hora para volver a casa. Supervisa con quién está, adónde va y qué hará. Te ganarás el mote de “sobreprotector”, pero está bien. Sé su padre, no un amigo. Todos los años en otoño y primavera, cuando llego al estacionamiento de la escuela veo carteles que dicen: “Reunión en tu morada, pérdida asegurada”. Esos carteles están dirigidos a los padres que quieren ser “geniales”. Estos son los padres que sirven alcohol en fiestas o no están presentes para supervisar. Algunos se defienden asegurando que se llevan las llaves, o que confían en sus hijos. Hablemos claro, gente. Darles alcohol a menores, te lleves las llaves o no, es ilegal en la mayoría de los estados. Si te descubren, estarás en problemas. Tan solo la responsabilidad es enorme. Nunca escuché a un padre decir: “bueno, los padres de cada uno me dieron permiso para que les sirviera alcohol en la fiesta”. Eso es porque la mayoría de los padres diría: “de ninguna manera”. ¿Y confías en tu hijo? ¿De verdad? ¿Confías en un adolescente de 14, 15, 16 o 17 años? Escucha, tengo un terreno inundado en venta que me gustaría que vieras. Un gran negocio.</p> <p>Lo que cuento a continuación es una historia real. Mis hijos sabían que yo siempre llamaba a otros padres cuando querían ir a una fiesta o hacer algo con sus hijos. Quería asegurarme de que no iba a faltar la supervisión de un adulto. Mi ego estaba perfectamente bien aunque sabía que no era la mamá “genial”. Un día, mi hijo me preguntó si podía ir a una fiesta. Le dije que iba a llamar a los otros padres, y que le avisaría. Estoy segura de que no le causó ninguna gracia, pero no dijo nada. Llamé a la anfitriona y le pregunté si estaría presente en toda la fiesta. Oí que suspiró un instante y me dijo: “¡yo confío en mis hijos!”. Insistí hasta que obtuve la respuesta que buscaba. Sí, ella y su esposo estarían presentes en la fiesta. Mi hijo fue y cuando lo pasé a buscar lo encontré en el jardín jugando con otros amigos. Mientras volvíamos a casa, le pregunté cómo había estado la fiesta y recibí un “bien” como respuesta. Insistí un poco más y le pregunté por qué estaba en el jardín y no en la casa. Estuvo callado por un instante y luego soltó todo: “Mamá, alguien tenía un cuchillo en la fiesta, por eso preferí salir”. Tragándome la ira que estaba sintiendo, lo felicité por haber tenido el buen criterio de retirarse de esa situación. Luego le pregunté dónde estaban los padres. Estuvieron en la planta alta toda la noche. Me contó detalles de chicos tirando comida, latas de refrigerios y básicamente mostrando cero respeto por una casa ajena.</p> <p>Sí, no fui la mamá “genial”, pero definitivamente fui mamá. Establecer con firmeza límites y conductas deseadas, exigir respeto y cortesía, y dejar que asuman las consecuencias naturales de sus errores son decisiones que sus hijos agradecerán. Este tipo de parámetros muestran que te preocupas y que valoras la salud, la seguridad y el bienestar de tu hijo. Podrán enojarse, pero no durará mucho tiempo, créeme. Y si dura más de la cuenta, tan solo espera a que tengan sus propios hijos. Te convertirás en la persona más inteligente del planeta.</p> <p><strong>• Infórmate, escucha y aprende sobre cómo planificar proyectos después del secundario. No temas buscar la ayuda de expertos.</strong> El principal objetivo de los padres es que sus hijos tengan una carrera que les permita solventarse y no necesiten volver a casa con ellos. Todos queremos que a nuestros hijos les vaya bien, estudien una carrera que les encante, y ganen el dinero suficiente para tener una independencia total. Los estudiantes tienen muchas opciones después de graduarse. Es importante apoyar sus sueños sin dejar de ser realistas. Aquí les doy algunos consejos:</p> <p>1. Con la ayuda del consejero estudiantil, traza un plan de estudios de cinco años (cuatro años de secundaria y el primer año postsecundaria) que lleve a tu hijo a la opción que sueña para después de graduarse. Tener ese “mapa de ruta” puede ayudar a tu hijo a ser realista en sus planes, y también podrá motivarlo a concretarlos con éxito. No está gravado en piedra; es muy probable que todos los años haya que hacer ajustes a medida que cambian las ofertas de cursos o los objetivos. Pero tener ese mapa te asegurará que se cumplan los requisitos, y que la planificación siga su curso. También te permitirá tener una visión realista a la hora de evaluar cursos, calificaciones y objetivos.</p> <p>2. Invita a tu hijo a buscar oportunidades de pasantías en sus áreas de interés. Estas oportunidades les ofrecen a los estudiantes valiosas conexiones con gente del área. Estos profesionales le pueden hablar de cursos y capacitación necesarios, calificaciones deseadas para acceder a determinados programas, características para triunfar en ese empleo, lo que les gusta/disgusta de su trabajo, salario inicial y condiciones laborales. Los jóvenes terminarán la pasantía con una de estas dos sensaciones: 1) Me encanta y quiero apostar por esta profesión, o 2) Fue divertido, pero no, gracias. Ambas representan datos esenciales. Es una prueba de realidad muy interesante que les transmite un experto en el área, y no los dejarán en una posición en la que les dicen que no saben nada. Además, podría evitar que la educación universitaria de tu hijo se convierta en el programa de exploración profesional más caro de la historia.</p> <p>3. Habla con el consejero estudiantil acerca de cómo planificar sus estudios después del secundario. Infórmate de las fechas límite, familiarízate con los programas en línea que ofrecen búsquedas de universidades y de carreras, asiste a las reuniones sobre asesoramiento financiero. No esperes que tu hijo lleve esa información a casa; ve, haz tu propia tarea e infórmate. El consejero estudiantil puede guiarte acerca de qué programas podrían ser los mejores según los sueños de tu hijo. Ellos conocen las pruebas que se necesitan para ingresar, y los mejores momentos para rendirlas. Los consejeros son guías infalibles en el proceso de planificación postsecundaria. Son el mejor recurso y sus servicios no tienen costo.</p> <p><strong>• Si descubres que tu hijo tiene problemas a nivel académico, social, emocional o contra el abuso de sustancias u otro tipo de problemas graves, pide ayuda rápido.</strong> Cuando hay más independencia, llegan las tentaciones, y hay un montón dando vueltas. Es fundamental que observes a tu hijo y a sus amigos. Lleva un control de su desempeño académico. Presta atención si hay cambios en su comportamiento. No intentes justificarlo. Sé honesto. Muchísimos padres intentan ocultar los problemas de sus hijos. Suelen avisar a la escuela con bastante rapidez si hay un problema académico, pero no lo hacen con otras dificultades. No hay nada de qué avergonzarse si tu hijo está atravesando algún problema; no quiere decir que seas un mal padre. Significa que tu hijo está luchando contra una dificultad y necesita ayuda. Puede estar ahogándose, pero recuerda que estás rodeado de personal con salvavidas. Colabora con el consejero estudiantil; escucha sus sugerencias para brindar ayuda, deja que se ocupen del lado académico de las cosas, que sean consejeros objetivos para ti y para tu hijo, el lazo entre los profesionales externos y las escuelas. En estos momentos, los padres necesitan alguien en su rincón del cuadrilátero que pueda pensar en forma objetiva y desprovisto de emociones. Los consejeros no están para juzgar; están para ayudarte en un momento complicado. Como les he dicho a padres que estaban desesperados, me ofrezco a ocuparme del problema en la escuela mientras ellos toman la posta en casa. El solo hecho de saber que no tienen que ocuparse de todo es un gran alivio para la familia. Manténgannos informados y permítannos ayudarlos.</p> <p>Podría escribir durante horas sobre la escuela secundaria, pero espero que estos consejos te ayuden a mantenerte conectado e informado en la transición a la graduación. Estos próximos cuatro años volarán, y luego llegará otra transición…</p> <p><em>Este artículo es parte de una serie de textos que analizan cómo los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos en las transiciones escolares. Lee otras publicaciones sobre el comienzo de la escuela primaria, la transición a la escuela intermedia y el ingreso en la universidad.</em></p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,03C3BA21-5056-9A4B-6C6DDCB7285C3372,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:06:23.687
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:57:09.413
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Guiding Our Children Through Transitions: High School
LASTUPDATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID DD2D6520-1362-11E4-98390050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03C3BA21-5056-9A4B-6C6DDCB7285C3372
PTOPIC F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
PUBLISHDATE 2014-08-13 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER So you have a high school student. You sit in the roller coaster car as you climb the incline of freshman year, sophomore year, then begin the crazy plummet into junior year and, ultimately, arrive at the end, senior year. These next four years will fly by, so hang on.
TEASERES Ya tienes un estudiante de secundaria. Estos cuatro años pasarán volando, así que sujétate fuerte.
TEASERIMAGE 8DFA0180-206F-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
TITLE Guiding Our Children Through Transitions: High School
TITLEES Cómo guiar a nuestros hijos en las transiciones escolares: escuela secundaria
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 585F9140-135A-11E4-98390050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

university campus

Making an Affordable College Choice

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1Ea5XPc
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Late winter and early spring are both exciting and stressful times in the college planning process. For many parents, excitement about acceptance letters is tempered by concerns about whether they can afford their child’s first-choice college. While scholarships are great resources that can help your teen pay for his education, they may not cover all of the costs involved, and financial aid can be a good option to help you offset some of these expenditures. If you haven’t already applied for financial aid, it’s important that you take action as soon as possible because it may provide you with the funding that you need to afford your child’s college education. UAspire is committed to helping parents find an affordable path to a postsecondary education for their children, and we have a great number of <a href="https://www.uaspire.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/FAFSA-Checklist.Flowchart.Final-Template-2012-2013-school-year.pdf">resources</a> to help you navigate the financial aid process.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=89385520-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318">Find out more about applying for financial aid and managing college costs.</a></p> <p>If you have already submitted your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), a deeper understanding of the financial aid awards your child receives and what you will be responsible for paying is a key step in deciding which college he should attend. Essentially there are two ways families pay for college – with gift aid that does not have to be repaid, or through self-financing, which means funds provided by your family from savings, current income, loans and other sources. </p> <p>Financial aid awards typically consist of three types of aid:</p> <p><strong>- Gift aid</strong> includes grants from the federal and state governments and college funds awarded based on the student’s demonstrated financial need. Scholarships come from colleges and are awarded based on merit such as outstanding academic achievement.</p> <p><strong>- Loans</strong> come from various sources. Most are Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans. Subsidized loans are for students from lower income families; the federal government pays the interest on these loans while the student is in college. Unsubsidized loans are available to all students and require students to pay the interest while in college. </p> <p><strong>- Federal work-study</strong> is money that students have to earn, usually through a job on campus. The student is responsible for finding the job, and colleges do not guarantee a job for every student who receives an award.</p> <p>Making sense of award letters can be challenging. Colleges do not describe the same types of aid using the same terms. Further complicating matters is that the amount of gift aid, loans and work-study differs from one college to another, making it hard to compare awards and determine what the student will actually have to pay at each college. </p> <p>Determining college costs involves subtracting the gift aid the student receives from the direct cost of attendance, which consists of tuition and fees, room and board. Scholarships students receive from their high school or a private organization should also be subtracted. This calculation provides the “net” cost for a student to attend a particular college and makes it easy to compare the direct costs of different colleges. Going a step further and subtracting the loans awarded to students from the net cost results in an estimate of what families will have to pay for their child’s first year. You will also need to budget for books, supplies, transportation and incidentals. You have more control over these costs than the direct costs charged by colleges. You may want to consider having your child attend a college close to home or live at home to limit incidental expenditures and reduce costs.</p> <p>Most colleges bill students twice a year. Half of the balance is due in the summer before they enroll and the balance before the second semester is billed in January.  If you can’t cover what your child owes from your income or savings, you have several options. Colleges offer payment plans that allow parents to spread college costs over ten months, usually beginning in May after the student has committed to enrolling. The federal government and some states also offer parent loans, the interest rates for which can be much lower than other types of loans. In addition, some private lenders offer parent loans. Generally, private loans have higher costs and less flexible repayment terms than those offered by federal and state agencies. In choosing a particular loan, it is important to compare the differences in interest rates, origination fees, and repayment terms. </p> <p>Making an informed financial decision about college will benefit you and your teen.  If you both take time to understand the various options for paying for college and the long-term implications of each one, you can help your teen make a college choice that works for both of you. In doing so, your teen will feel that the college she attends fits her needs and interests, and is a choice that is affordable for the entire family. You will also be allowing her to focus on her studies instead of having to worry about the stresses of paying for college on her own. At the same time, you can rest assured that whatever accommodations you may need to make for your child’s education are reasonable and not unduly burdensome.  In the long term, a carefully considered decision will reduce financial stress on the family and help prevent the possibility of your child leaving college before completing a degree. It will also allow her to get a good start toward achieving her career and life goals, which is priceless.</p> <p><em>Bob Giannino is the Chief Executive Officer of <a href="https://www.uaspire.org/">uAspire</a>, a national leader in providing college affordability services to young people and families. uAspire partners with high schools, community organizations, and colleges to provide advice to more than 10,000 young people and their families every year.</em></p>
BODYES <p>El final del invierno y el comienzo de la primavera es una época emocionante y muy estresante en el proceso de planificación de los estudios universitarios. Para muchos padres, la emoción de recibir la carta de aceptación se ve nublada por su preocupación sobre si podrán pagar la universidad que sea la primera opción de su hijo. Si bien las becas son un excelente recurso que ayuda a pagar la educación de tu hijo, no siempre cubren todos los costos, y la ayuda financiera puede ser una buena opción para ayudarte a cubrir algunos de estos gastos. Si aún no has solicitado ningún tipo de ayuda financiera, es importante que lo hagas cuanto antes porque podría proporcionarte los fondos que necesitas para pagar los estudios universitarios de tu hijo. El compromiso de UAspire es ayudar a los padres a encontrar un camino asequible para la educación terciaria de sus hijos, y contamos con una gran cantidad de recursos para ayudarlos en el proceso de solicitar ayuda financiera. </p> <p><em>Encuentra más información sobre cómo solicitar ayuda financiera y el manejo de los costos.</em> </p> <p>Si ya has presentado la Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes (FAFSA, Free Application for Federal Student Aid), es fundamental que conozcas en profundidad el tipo de ayuda financiera que recibirá tu hijo y qué gastos serán tu responsabilidad para decidir a qué universidad debe asistir tu hijo. Básicamente, existen dos formas en que las familias pagan los estudios universitarios: mediante una subvención que no debe reembolsarse o mediante financiación propia, es decir, fondos provenientes de los ahorros familiares, ingresos actuales, préstamos u otras fuentes. </p> <p>La asistencia financiera suele dividirse en tres tipos:</p> <ul> <li>Subvenciones no reembolsables otorgadas por el gobierno federal y/o estatal y becas universitarias otorgadas según las necesidades financieras comprobadas del estudiante. Las becas otorgadas por las universidades se entregan según el mérito, como por ejemplo, logros académicos sobresalientes.</li> <li>Préstamos que pueden obtenerse de varias fuentes. La mayoría son Préstamos Federales Directos con y sin subsidio. Los préstamos con subsidio se otorgan a los estudiantes de familias de ingresos más bajos. El gobierno federal paga los intereses del préstamo mientras el estudiante asiste a la universidad. Los préstamos sin subsidio están disponibles para todos los estudiantes y estos deben pagar los intereses mientras asisten a la universidad. </li> <li>El Programa Federal de Estudio y Trabajo ofrece puestos de trabajo a los estudiantes, en general en el campus. El estudiante tiene la responsabilidad de buscar un trabajo y las universidades no garantizan un puesto para cada estudiante que participe en este programa.</li> </ul> <p>Comprender las cartas de otorgamiento de becas puede ser todo un desafío. Las universidades no describen el mismo tipo de ayuda usando la misma terminología. Y para complicar más las cosas, el monto de la subvención, préstamo o beca para trabajo-estudio varía de una universidad a otra. De manera que es muy difícil hacer una comparación y poder dilucidar cuánto deberá pagar el estudiante.</p> <p>Para determinar los costos de la universidad debes restar el monto de ayuda financiera que recibe el estudiante al costo directo de asistencia, que está formado por los gastos de matrícula y cargos, alojamiento y comida. También debes restar cualquier beca que reciba el estudiante de su escuela secundaria o de una organización privada. Este cálculo permite conocer el costo “neto”para que el estudiante asista a una universidad en particular y hace más sencillo comparar los costos directos de diferentes instituciones. Si avanzamos un paso más y restamos al costo neto el monto del préstamo estudiantil otorgado, obtendremos un estimado de lo que la familia deberá pagar por el primer año de universidad de su hijo. También deberás contar con un presupuesto para los libros de texto, transporte y contingencias; aunque tendrás mayor control sobre estos gastos que sobre los costos directos que cobran las universidades. También sería prudente evaluar la posibilidad de que tu hijo asista a una universidad más cerca de casa o que siga viviendo en casa para limitar los gastos imprevistos y reducir los costos. </p> <p>La mayoría de las universidades emiten su factura dos veces por año. La mitad del monto debe saldarse durante el verano anterior a la inscripción. El saldo restante se factura en enero y debe cancelarse antes del inicio del segundo semestre. Si no puedes pagar la deuda con tus ingresos o ahorros, tienes varias opciones. Las universidades ofrecen planes de pago que dividen los costos en diez pagos mensuales que, generalmente, comienzan en mayo luego de que el estudiante se ha comprometido a inscribirse. El gobierno federal y algunos estados también ofrecen préstamos para padres, y las tasas de interés pueden llegar a ser mucho menores que las de otros tipos de préstamos. Algunos prestamistas privados también ofrecen préstamos para padres. Por los general, los préstamos privados tienen costos más altos y condiciones de pago menos flexibles que los préstamos ofrecidos por las agencias federales y estatales. Al elegir un préstamo, es importante comparar las tasas de interés, los gastos de emisión y las condiciones de pago. </p> <p>Tomar una decisión informada en temas financieros será beneficioso para todos. Si dedican tiempo a analizar las diferentes opciones que existen para pagar la universidad y las consecuencias a largo plazo que acarrea cada una podrás ayudar a tu hijo a elegir una universidad que se ajuste a las expectativas de ambos. También le permitirá a tu hijo concentrarse en sus estudios en vez de tener que preocuparse por tener que pagar la universidad solo. Al mismo tiempo, tendrás la seguridad de que sin importar la deuda que debas contraer para garantizar la educación de hijo, será razonable y no excesivamente onerosa. En el largo plazo, una decisión analizada con prudencia reducirá la carga financiera sobre la familia y evitará la posibilidad de que tu hijo tenga que abandonar la universidad antes de graduarse. También le permitirá a tu hijo dar el primer paso para poder alcanzar sus metas profesionales, lo cual es invaluable. </p> <p>Bob Giannino es el Director ejecutivo de uAspire, líder nacional en servicios de financiación para jóvenes y familias. uAspire se asocia con las escuelas secundarias, organizaciones comunitarias y universidades para ofrecer asesoramiento a más de 10.000 jóvenes y sus familias cada año.</p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:13.273
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:04:11.383
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Making an Affordable College Choice
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 27661C90-BEBC-11E4-AF9C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2015-03-02 11:30:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Understanding how financial aid works and what your family will be responsible for paying is key to finding an affordable college choice for your teen.
TEASERES El final del invierno y el comienzo de la primavera es una época emocionante y muy estresante en el proceso de planificación de los estudios universitarios.
TEASERIMAGE 71D9C2E0-2436-11E7-BDE80050569A4B6C
TITLE Making an Affordable College Choice
TITLEES Cómo elegir una universidad asequible
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 909D5680-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Mother Daughter Walking and Talking

3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2flNyHp
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>What are college admissions officers looking for in the volunteering and service section of your student’s application?</p> <p>Turns out it’s not quantity or prestige, but rather, <em>meaning</em>.</p> <p>In fact, many educators and deans of admission at some of the country’s most selective schools contributed to or endorsed a report published last January by the <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/">Making Caring Common Project</a> at the Harvard Graduate School of Education: <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/20160120_mcc_ttt_report_interactive.pdf"><em>Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern For Others And the Common Good Through College Admissions</em></a>.</p> <p>Harvard Lecturer Richard Weissbourd was the lead author of the report. He says finding a sustained, meaningful service experience is something all young people should have, not just for college applications, but for life.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=DB033AA0-609E-11E6-A4B10050569A5318">RELATED: Adding Caring to Your Kids College Application</a></p> <p>As service and volunteering tend to be on the minds of many people during this time of year, here are three ways parents can encourage our kids to find meaningful ways to give back.</p> <p><strong>1. </strong><strong>Help your kid find their authentic voice and passions.</strong></p> <p>The first step is having a conversation, or more likely, many conversations, with your kid about what really makes them tick. Taking the time to listen to your kid is not only a great chance for bonding, but an opportunity to learn about the person they are becoming.</p> <p>“Let your kid take initiative,” Weissbourd says. “Help guide them, but listen to their input and what they have to say. Ask your child to imagine a variety of service experiences and how they fit into them.”</p> <p>There are countless service experiences that take many different forms, ideologies, political perspectives, and faiths. While sometimes it may seem like your student has to get involved in everything, it is really an exciting moment for your kid to discover what their values are, Weissbourd says. Taking a step back to recognize this will be extremely beneficial in the long run.</p> <p>“It’s a really important ethical parenting moment and you really have to come to terms with what’s important to you,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>We all want what’s best for our kids. Sometimes we dream they will attend the college we went to, or that they will have everything we didn’t, or they will love to volunteer at an organization we’re passionate about. But our expectations of our kids shouldn’t cloud our understanding of what they need to thrive, Weissbourd says.</p> <p>“Too often kids think about what colleges want and how do I fit that,” Weissbourd said. “Parents have to help kids find what works for them and fits them.”</p> <p><strong>2. </strong><strong>Look for quality in service opportunities over quantity.</strong></p> <p>This sentiment is entwined in so many aspects of life, and it remains true for service, too.</p> <p>“It’s not the number of activities you do, it’s the quality of engagement,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>One practical way to help your kid find their own quality service opportunities is to actually limit your child in the number of activities they take part in. Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">suggests</a> asking the questions: “Why is this activity meaningful to you? What goals does it achieve? What have you learned about yourself, others, and your communities?” These questions force your child to pick what is most valuable to them and to think about why that is.</p> <p>Another way to emphasize quality is to not think about college applications at all! Some parents may scoff at this idea, but it will actually benefit your kid to choose activities simply by what they are passionate about.</p> <p>Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">advises</a> parents to “Encourage your children to choose activities that they have a legitimate interest in—not those that they think admission officers will value.”</p> <p>Ironically, this is what ends up shining through the most on the college application, Weissbourd says.</p> <p>And an added benefit? When your child is more aware of their own passions and values, they will be so much more prepared for the college application process.</p> <p><strong>3. </strong><strong>Encourage your kid to find community with their service.</strong></p> <p>When engaging in service, use the model, “Do with, not for,” Weissbourd says. It is a slippery slope between service for the greater good, and service for appearance sake.</p> <p>“[As a culture] we have demoted concern for others, concern for the common good and ethical engagement in the college admissions process,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>Parents can help kids by encouraging their students to get involved in service that has a lot of diversity. Explain to your kids that you are not a “savior,” but rather forming community with people, often times different from yourself, for a greater cause.</p> <p>Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">says</a>, “Experiences in diverse groups are not only important for your children ethically and emotionally, but can enable your children to develop key cognitive skills, including problem-solving skills and group awareness, that are key to success in work and life.”</p> <p>And mostly importantly, talk to your kid about what makes working within a diverse community both challenging and rewarding.</p> <p>“Parents work hard to raise kind and empathetic kids,” Weissbourd says. “What’s challenging is to raise kids who are kind and empathetic to people outside of their immediate circle of concern. These service experiences play a big part in that. It can be a really meaningful rite of passage.”</p> <p> </p> <p><em>This piece is part of the Parent Toolkit’s Week of Giving. Click <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A17F9E20-516C-11E3-839E0050569A5318">here</a> to read more inspirational stories.</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Follow the Parent Toolkit on </strong><a href="http://bit.ly/2bQX6cp" target="_blank"><strong>Facebook</strong></a><strong>, </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/educationnation" target="_blank"><strong>Twitter</strong></a><strong>, and </strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/theparenttoolkit/" target="_blank"><strong>Instagram</strong></a><strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p>
BODYES <p>¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?</p> <p>No se trata de cantidad ni de prestigio, sino de significado.</p> <p>De hecho, muchos educadores y decanos de admisión en algunas de las instituciones más selectivas del país contribuyeron o respaldaron un informe publicado en enero por Making Caring Common Project de Harvard Graduate School of Education: Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern For Others And the Common Good Through College Admissions (Cambio de rumbo: Una preocupación inspiradora por el otro y el bien común a través de las admisiones universitarias).</p> <p>Richard Weissbourd, profesor de Harvard, fue el autor principal de este informe. Asegura que encontrar una experiencia de servicio sostenida y significativa es una vivencia que todos los jóvenes deberían tener, no solo para ingresar en una universidad, sino para su vida.</p> <p>Como el servicio y el voluntariado suelen estar muy presentes en la cabeza de muchas personas en esta época del año, aquí encontrarás tres formas en que los padres pueden incentivar a sus hijos a encontrar formas de ayudar que sean significativas.</p> <h4>1. Ayuda a tu hijo a encontrar su identidad y pasiones verdaderas.</h4> <p>El primer paso sería tener una conversación, en realidad, muchas conversaciones con tu hijo sobre lo que realmente le interesa. Tomarte el tiempo para escuchar a tu hijo no es solo una gran oportunidad de unión entre ambos, sino también la posibilidad de conocer en qué persona se está convirtiendo.</p> <p>“Deja que tu hijo tome la iniciativa”, sugiere Weissbourd. “Oriéntalo, pero escucha lo que tiene para decirte. Pídele que imagine una serie de experiencias de servicio y cómo se vería en ellas”.</p> <p>Hay innumerables experiencias de servicio que toman diversas formas, ideologías, perspectivas políticas y creencias religiosas. Si bien, a veces, parece que tu hijo debe participar en todo, es un momento ideal para que descubra cuáles son sus valores, sostiene Weissbourd. Tomarse un tiempo para reconocer esto será extremadamente beneficioso a largo plazo.</p> <p>“Es un momento realmente importante en términos de ética en cuanto al rol de ser padre o madre, y debes tener en claro qué es relevante para ti”, agrega Weissbourd.</p> <p>Todos queremos lo mejor para nuestros hijos. A veces soñamos con que asistan a nuestra universidad, o que tengan todo lo que no tuvimos, o que les encantará trabajar como voluntarios en una organización que nos apasiona. Pero las expectativas que depositemos en nuestros hijos no deberían nublar nuestra opinión de lo que ellos necesitan para avanzar, comenta Weissbourd.</p> <p>“Los jóvenes suelen detenerse en lo que buscan las universidades y cómo podrían adaptarse a eso”, explica Weissbourd. “Los padres tienen que ayudar a sus hijos a encontrar aquello que funcione y se adapte a ellos”.</p> <h4>2. Busca calidad por sobre cantidad en las oportunidades de servicio.</h4> <p>Este concepto se entrelaza en innumerables aspectos de la vida, y el servicio no es la excepción.</p> <p>“No se trata de la cantidad de actividades que hagas, sino de la calidad del compromiso”, explica Weissbourd.</p> <p>Una manera práctica de ayudar a tu hijo a encontrar sus oportunidades de dar un servicio de calidad es limitar la cantidad de actividades en las que participa. Making Caring Common sugiere hacer estas preguntas: “¿Por qué esta actividad es significativa para ti? ¿Qué objetivos cumple? ¿Qué aprendiste de ti, de otros y de tus comunidades?”. Estas preguntas obligan a tu hijo a elegir aquello que sea más valioso para él y a pensar en por qué lo es.</p> <p>Otra forma de enfatizar la calidad es no pensar en las solicitudes universitarias. Algunos padres podrían reírse de esta idea, pero así tu hijo podrá elegir actividades solo teniendo en cuenta lo que le apasiona.</p> <p>Making Caring Common les aconseja a los padres que “incentiven a sus hijos a elegir actividades en las que tengan un interés legítimo, no aquellas en las que creen que valorarán los responsables de las admisiones”.</p> <p>Irónicamente, esto es lo que termina destacándose en las solicitudes universitarias, describe Weissbourd.</p> <p>¿Otro beneficio? Cuando tu hijo es más consciente de sus pasiones y valores, estará mucho más preparado para el proceso de admisión universitaria.</p> <h4>3. Incentiva a tu hijo a encontrar a su comunidad en el servicio elegido.</h4> <p>Cuando elija un servicio, ten presente la frase “Haz con, no por”, sugiere Weissbourd. Hay una línea muy delgada entre involucrarse en un servicio para el bien común o hacerlo por las apariencias.</p> <p>“[Como cultura] hemos menospreciado el valor de la preocupación por el otro, por el bien común y por el ejercicio ético en el proceso de admisiones universitarias”, afirma Weissbourd.</p> <p>Los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos estimulándolos a que participen en actividades que tengan que ver con la diversidad. Explícale a tu hijo que no eres un “salvador”, pero sí que formas parte de una comunidad con personas que suelen ser diferentes a ti y que se unen por una causa mayor.</p> <p>Making Caring Common agrega: “Las experiencias que tu hijo pueda vivir en grupos diversos no solo son importantes desde una óptica ética y emocional, sino que pueden ayudarlo a desarrollar habilidades cognitivas clave, como la capacidad de resolver problemas y tener conciencia de grupo, fundamentales para triunfar en el trabajo y en la vida”.</p> <p>Y, lo más importante, habla con tu hijo de lo desafiante y gratificante que resulta trabajar dentro de una comunidad diversa.</p> <p>“Los padres se esfuerzan para criar jóvenes generosos y empáticos”, considera Weissbourd. “El desafío está en criar jóvenes que sean generosos y empáticos con las personas que están fuera de su círculo más cercano. Estas experiencias de servicio tienen un rol muy importante al respecto. Pueden ser un ritual de transición de vital importancia”.</p> <p><em>Este artículo es parte de la sección Week of Giving de Parent Toolkit. Haz clic aquí para leer otras historias inspiradoras. </em> </p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,03CEEDAC-5056-9A4B-6C55C606D8A092FF,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
CMLABEL 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:52.363
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:28:25.39
DESCRIPTION Volunteering and service may help with college applications, but it enhances lives.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit on how to help high schoolers find meaning in service.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Here are some ways that you can help your high schooler find meaning in service:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0AA89B10-AD11-11E6-89870050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03CEEDAC-5056-9A4B-6C55C606D8A092FF
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-11-26 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER <p>As service and volunteering tend to be on the minds of many people during this time of year, here are three ways parents can encourage our kids to find meaningful ways to give back.</p>
SHORTTEASERES ¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Service looks good on a college application, but this Harvard educator explains why quality is the key.
TEASERES ¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?
TEASERIMAGE 4E7A7C10-1944-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
TITLEES 3 formas para orientar a un estudiante de secundario a encontrar el significado en ayudar al prójimo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Explore some ways you can help your high schooler find meaning in service:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Social and Emotional Development

Research shows that those with higher social-emotional skills have better attention skills and fewer learning problems, and are generally more successful in academic and workplace settings. Like math or English, these skills can be taught and grow over time.

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is knowing your emotions, strengths and challenges, and how your emotions affect your behavior and decisions.

Self-Management

Self-management is controlling emotions and the behaviors they spark in order to overcome challenges and pursue goals.

Social Awareness

Social awareness is understanding and respecting the perspectives of others, and applying this knowledge to social interactions with people from diverse backgrounds.

Relationships

The ability to interact meaningfully with others and to maintain healthy relationships with diverse individuals and groups contributes to overall success.

Responsible Decision-Making

Responsible decision-making is the ability to make choices that are good for you and for others. It is also taking into account your wishes and the wishes of others.

Recommended

dad and sad son

Why Parents Should Apologize When They Lose Their Cool

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1HRXS3j
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>All parents will lose your cool at times. Why? Because you are human. You cannot handle unlimited amounts of stress, disappointment, and unmet expectations. Another reason is that our emotional brain systems, which are linked to our identity, lead us to feel badly, or inadequate, when it might appear that our children are not turning out as we would like. Rightly or wrongly, these kinds of strong feelings can lead to angry outbursts. </p> <p>But what does one do afterwards? Can hurtful words be erased? In large part, the answer is, yes.</p> <p>An effective parental apology involves a deep understanding of our child’s feelings, a great deal of self-control, and good social skills. What it does for children is immense. It reassures them about their worth and their value in the world. It lets them know that their parents care enough about them to talk to them in a serious way and admit that they made a mistake. It allows children to learn humility, a companion of empathy. Finally, it alleviates the stress of uncertainty, shame, and doubt that children feel, over having provoked or, in their eyes, deservedly caused, parental over or under-reaction.</p> <p><span class="white"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=9214C140-32E9-11E4-AB0A0050569A5318">Learn more about how you can enhance your social and emotional skills.</a></span></p> <p>Apologizing does not mean that you forget whatever your child did that was upsetting. Actually, it means that you clarify that some of what you said was hurtful and had to do with your own frustration. But there is a part of the message you want your child to get; here are some examples.</p> <p>In each case, the opening lines are something like:</p> <p>“I know used a tone of voice/yelled/said some things in a way that I should not have. I apologize for that. There was a lot going on and it got to me. So let me be clear about what I really wanted to say….”</p> <p>“When you tell me you are going to be in one place and then you go to another, that is wrong. I feel as if you don’t trust me. I know you can keep track of what you tell me and you can remember to tell me where you are. So I expect that from you.”</p> <p>“It makes me very unhappy when you hit your brother. It is not a kind thing to do. There are many times that you get along well with your brother, and I know that you can act this way much more often.”</p> <p>As you can see, the apology follows the formula, “I was wrong to say what I did, it was the result of my stress, but here is what I want to make sure you remember and here is the strength I know you can bring with you into situations that might occur in the future…” You might also want to be clear about consequences as a result of what happened, or what will happen if the problem repeats itself.</p> <p>Remember, your goal is to be more educational than punitive and to get the behavior in question to change. Another way to address these challenges between you and your child in the future is to get on the same wavelength, as you will likely have more positive results this way. The 4C’s of Emotionally Intelligent Parenting, Clarify, Coordinate, Choose, and Care, are tools that can help you make your relationship more harmonious:</p> <p><strong>Clarify.</strong> One or both parents need to make a commitment to clarify what is happening with their kids. First, each parent must be clear. What is the issue here? What are the emotional issues involved for each child? What do I really think about presents? About school work? Why do I feel this way? Is this really what I believe or am I trying to impress someone, show someone something, or make a point? What do I want my kids to learn most of all from this situation? And am I showing my confidence in them?</p> <p><strong>Coordinate.</strong> Once each parent is clear, then it is time to compare views and find common ground. Where there is common ground, kids can feel a great deal of psychological safety. This is where they can be reached, and can thrive. </p> <p><strong>Choose.</strong> Once there is some coordination, then choices must be made. “This is what we are going to do.” You need to take charge. There may be times where these choices can be informed by conversations with children, and this is especially true as they get older, but there are many times whenyou just have to decide and move on. This is a great favor to your children.  Uncertainty, lack of clarity, and parents who do not act like parents are frustrating, anxiety-provoking, and frightening for kids. The complaints that children will make about choices parents make are tiny compared to the relief they feel at finally having some clarity and some limits. And this is especially true when they feel both parents are in agreement.</p> <p><strong>Care.</strong> After the choices are made, it’s a good idea for you to show that they care about your child’s feelings. Emotionally intelligent parenting gives us a tool for this: keeping track of what happens. Are things going better as a result of the choices that have been made? Is there enough work time? Is the shopping getting done? Arrange check-in times just to see how things are going.  If necessary, the process can start over, as the new situation is clarified and new ideas are coordinated and new choices made. We show caring through our attention, concern, and follow up just as strongly as through hugs, praise, and little notes of encouragement. It is our way of saying that, as busy as we are and with all the things we are dealing with as adults, we have time and make a priority to see how our children are doing in important matters that a family has identified.</p>
BODYES <p>Todos los padres perderán los estribos en algún momento. ¿Por qué? Porque son seres humanos. Es imposible lidiar con cantidades ilimitadas de estrés, decepción y expectativas insatisfechas. Otro motivo es que los sistemas emocionales del cerebro, que están vinculados con nuestra identidad, nos hacen sentir mal o incompetentes cuando nos parece que nuestros hijos no están haciendo las cosas como querríamos. Para bien o para mal, este tipo de sentimientos pueden conducir a un estallido de ira.</p> <p>Pero ¿qué hacemos después? ¿Podemos hacer desaparecer esas palabras hirientes? En gran parte, la respuesta es sí.</p> <p>La disculpa eficaz de un padre involucra la comprensión profunda de los sentimientos de tu hijo, una gran dosis de autocontrol y buenas habilidades sociales. El resultado que tiene en los niños es muy grande. Les confirma su importancia y valor en el mundo. Les permite saber que sus padres se preocupan por ellos lo suficiente como para hablarles en forma seria y luego admitir que cometieron un error. Les permite a los niños aprender el valor de la humildad, que es compañera inseparable de la empatía. Por último, alivia la incertidumbre, la vergüenza y las dudas que puedan sentir los niños por haber provocado esa reacción en sus padres y que, según ellos entienden, fue merecida.</p> <p>Pedir disculpas no significa que olvidarás lo que haya hecho tu hijo para enojarte. En realidad, significa que aclaras los tantos sobre algo que dijiste que fue hiriente y que estaba relacionado con tu propia frustración. Y esta es la parte del mensaje que quieres que tu hijo entienda; estos son algunos ejemplos.</p> <p>En cada caso, puedes comenzar diciendo:</p> <p>“Sé que usé un tono de voz/grité/dije cosas de una forma en la que no debía, te pido disculpas por eso. Estaban pasando muchas cosas y perdí el control. Quisiera aclarar las cosas, porque en realidad quería decir que... ”</p> <p>“Cuando me dices que estarás en un lugar y después vas a otro, eso está mal. Siento que no confías en mi. Sabes que recuerdo las cosas que me dices y tú puedes recordar decirme donde estás. Eso es lo que espero de ti”.</p> <p>“Me entristece mucho ver que le pegas a tu hermano. No está bien hacer eso. En muchas ocasiones te llevas bien con él, y lo sé porque los he visto”.</p> <p>Como puedes ver, la disculpa tiene una estructura: “Me equivoqué al decir lo que dije, fue por culpa del estrés, pero esto es lo que quiero que recuerdes y esta es la fortaleza que sé que tienes para enfrentar situaciones que puedan ocurrir en el futuro...”. También sería bueno que seas especifico sobre las consecuencias como resultado de lo que ocurrió, o qué ocurrirá si el problema se repite.</p> <p>Recuerda, tu objetivo es más educativo que punitivo, y conseguir que la conducta en cuestión se modifique. Otra forma de enfrentar estos desafíos entre tú y tus hijos es tratar de estar en la misma sintonía, ya que de esta forma es más probable que tengan resultados más positivos. Estas son las cuatro herramientas principales para una crianza emocionalmente inteligente y que te ayudarán a que tus relaciones sean más armoniosas:</p> <p><strong>Aclarar.</strong> Uno o ambos padres tiene que hacer el compromiso de aclarar a sus hijos lo que ocurre. Primero, cada padre debe ser claro. ¿Cuál es el tema en cuestión? ¿Cuáles son los temas emocionales que involucran a cada hijo? ¿Qué pienso en verdad sobre los regalos? ¿Qué pasa con las tareas escolares? ¿Por qué me siento así? ¿Realmente creo en esto o estoy tratando de impresionar a alguien, de demostrar algo? ¿Qué quiero que aprendan mis hijos de esta situación? ¿Estoy mostrando que confío en ellos?</p> <p><strong>Coordinar.</strong> Una vez que los padres son claros, es momento de comparar opiniones y buscar las coincidencias. Cuando hay cosas en común, los niños sienten mayor seguridad psicológica. En este momento es cuando se puede tener mayor llegada a ellos y se pueden desarrollar las cosas.</p> <p><strong>Elegir.</strong> Una vez que se hayan coordinado los temas, entonces se pueden tomas decisiones. “Esto es lo que haremos”. Tú tienes que tomar el control. En ocasiones, estas elecciones pueden informarse a los niños en una conversación, lo cual es especialmente cierto a medida que crecen, pero muchas otras veces solo tienes que decidir y seguir adelante. Esto es un gran favor para tus hijos. La incertidumbre, la falta de claridad y padres que no se comportan como padres pueden generar frustración, asiedad y temor en los niños. Las quejas que puedan tener los niños sobre las decisiones de los padres son pequeñas en comparación con el alivio que sienten al tener las cosas claras y algunos límites. Y esto se comprueba cuando ambos padres están de acuerdo.</p> <p><strong>Cuidar.</strong> Después de las hacer las elecciones, es una buena idea demostrarle a tus hijos que te preocupas por sus sentimientos. La crianza emocionalmente inteligente nos da una herramienta para esto: registrar lo que ocurre. ¿Las cosas están mejor como resultado de las elecciones que se hicieron? ¿Hay suficiente tiempo de trabajo? ¿Se hacen las compras? Organiza los horarios para ver cómo se hacen las cosas. Si es necesario, se puede iniciar el proceso nuevamente, a medida que la nueva situación se aclara, se coordinan nuevas ideas y se toman nuevas decisiones. Demostramos nuestro cuidado y afecto mediante la atención, la preocupación y el seguimiento, de la misma manera que lo hacemos con abrazos, elogios y pequeñas notas de apoyo. Es nuestra forma de decir que, sin importar lo ocupados que estemos con todas las cosas con las que tenemos que lidiar por ser adultos, para nosotros siempre es una prioridad ver cómo les está yendo a nuestros hijos en los temas que son importantes para la familia.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:08:13.653
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:00:26.023
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Why Parents Should Apologize When They Lose Their Cool
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID E2EC9A20-70F6-11E4-98050050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2014-12-01 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER We've all been there - your child lets you down or says something that just pushes your buttons. Before you know it, you've said something you regret. How can you make it right? Dr. Maurice Elias explains.
TEASERES Todos los padres perderán los estribos en algún momento. ¿Por qué? Porque son seres humanos. Es imposible lidiar con cantidades ilimitadas de estrés, decepción y expectativas insatisfechas.
TEASERIMAGE 3471B380-1AE1-11E7-8B500050569A4B6C
TITLE Why Parents Should Apologize When They Lose Their Cool
TITLEES Por qué los padres deben pedir disculpas cuando pierden los estribos
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09713-0793-7966-3CBC318C02159515

mother daughter talk

How to Get Kids to Open Up About Their School Day

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/WmLsML
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Does trying to get your kids to open up about their day feel like an inquisition? Do you feel like you’re giving your kid the third degree to tell you anything about their life? If so, studies show that using different communication techniques can help kids open up and share more about their life. Here’s the typical conversation:</p> <p>You: “What did you learn today?” Kid: “Nothing.”<br /> You: “Do you have any homework? Kid: "Nope."<br /> You: “Did you make a new friend?” Kid: "Yep."<br /> <br /> If this sounds at all familiar, don’t despair. There are ways to get children to talk about their school day and even give us a clue as to what’s going on in their world. The trick is to use a few different communication strategies. Find ones that work best for you and your kid and then practice the same one over and over until they become second nature. Also: expect only a gradual opening up–never an over-night change.</p> <h4>14 Tips to Get Kids to Open Up and Talk More About What’s Going On in Their Lives (and get beyond “Nope,” “Yep,” and “Fine!”)</h4> <p><strong>1. Wait at <em>least </em>a half an hour</strong></p> <p>Kids are generally drained and strained the moment they walk in door. So wait at least 30 minutes to start talking about school. Give your child a chance to decompress and have a snack, take off the backpack, and just breathe.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=C438B4B0-A0CC-11E3-87540050569A5318">Check out the Academic Tips to see how you can support your child's learning this year in school</a></p> <p><strong>2. Don’t turn questions into a third degree</strong></p> <p>What would make you want to open up and tell her all those details? The same rules apply to kids. Big kid turn offs: pushing, prodding, demanding, coaxing, lecturing and threatening.</p> <p><strong>3. Look interested</strong></p> <p>Think of how your best friend asks you about your day. Use her example. Make sure you are relaxed and appear genuinely interested when you speak to your child.</p> <p><strong>4. Ask questions that require more than yes or no</strong></p> <p>“Do you have homework?” “Did you give your speech?” are questions that make your kid only have to answer with a yes or no response. So pose questions that require your child to respond with more than just yes, no, nope, sure, nothing, fine.</p> <p><strong>5. Don’t use the same questions</strong></p> <p>A big kid turn off is hearing your same old predictable: “How was your day?” query. So be creative. Churn up those questions so your kid knows you are interested!</p> <p><strong>6. Stop and listen</strong></p> <p>The nanosecond your child utters ANYTHING related to school, stop  and give your full presence. Catch any little nugget of information and make it seem as though it’s a gold mine. Kids open up more when they think you’re interesting.</p> <p><strong>7. Stretch conversation with “invitation openers” </strong></p> <p>If and when your child shares a detail try using the “stretching method.” Don’t push or prod but instead use these type of comments: “Really?” “Uh-huh?” “I don’t believe it!” “Wow!” They’re not threatening and invite a talker to open up.</p> <p><strong>8. Repeat “talk” portions</strong></p> <p>Try repeating bits of your child’s conversation: Child: “I played on the swing.” You: “You played on the swing.” The trick is to repeat the tidbit in a matter-of-fact but interested way to get your child to open up and add more.</p> <p><strong>9. Make your house kid-friendly</strong></p> <p>Many parents swear they find out more about school from their kids’ friends than from their own child. So invite your child’s friends over. Keep the fridge stocked with food. Set up a basketball court (or whatever you need to keep those kids at your house). And then be friendly (but not intrusive) to the friend. You may find that not only do the friends open up more, but your child will tag onto the friend’s conversation.</p> <p><strong>10. Get on the school website</strong></p> <p>Find out what’s going on in your kid’s school world: read the teacher newsletters, click onto the school calendar, read the school activities schedule and menu. You can then ask specific questions about your kid’s day.</p> <p><em>This blog was originally posted on Michele Borba's website. <a href="http://micheleborba.com/blog/getting-kids-to-open-up-about-their-school-day/">Click here</a> to get more tips and information from Borba.</em></p>
BODYES <p>¿Sientes que estás en una inquisición cuando intentas averiguar cómo le fue a tu hijo en la escuela? ¿Te parece que lo estás sometiendo a un interrogatorio cuando esperas que te cuente algo de su vida? Si es así, te interesará saber que está demostrado que diferentes técnicas de comunicación pueden ayudar para que los niños se abran y compartan más sobre su vida. Esta es la típica conversación:</p> <p>Tú: “¿Qué aprendiste hoy?”. Niño: “Nada”.<br />Tú: “¿Tienes tarea?”. Niño: “Nop”.<br />Tú: “¿Hiciste algún amigo nuevo? ”. Niño: “Sip”.</p> <p>Si esto te suena familiar, no te desesperes. Hay formas para lograr que los niños nos cuenten sobre su día en la escuela y que hasta nos den una pista de lo que está pasando en su mundo. El truco consiste en usar distintas estrategias de comunicación. Encuentra las que funcionen mejor para ti y tu hijo, y ponlas en práctica una y otra vez hasta que las hayas incorporado. Espera un cambio gradual, nunca será de un día para otro.</p> <p><strong>14 consejos para facilitar que los niños se abran y hablen más sobre lo que ocurre en sus vidas (y obtener algo más que solo “Nop”, “Sip” y “¡Bien!”)</strong></p> <p><strong>1. Espera, <em>al menos</em>, media hora</strong></p> <p>Por lo general, los niños están agotados cuando llegan a casa. Por eso, espera al menos 30 minutos antes de hablar sobre la escuela. Dale la posibilidad de relajarse, tomar un refrigerio, quitarse la mochila y tomar un poco de aire.</p> <p><strong>2. No lo conviertas en un interrogatorio</strong></p> <p>¿En qué condiciones te gustaría abrirte y contar detalles sobre una situación? Las mismas reglas se aplican para los niños. Grandes ahuyentadores de niños: insistir, presionar, exigir, persuadir, aleccionar y amenazar.</p> <p><strong>3. Demuestra interés</strong></p> <p>Piensa en cómo te pregunta tu mejor amigo sobre tu día. Usa ese ejemplo. Asegúrate de mostrarte relajado e interesado de verdad cuando hablas con tu hijo.</p> <p><strong>4. Haz preguntas que requieran otra respuesta que no sea solo sí o no</strong></p> <p>“¿Tienes tarea?”, “¿Diste la lección?” son preguntas que llevan a tu hijo a contestar solo sí o no. Entonces formula preguntas que requieran otras respuestas además de “sí”, “no”, “nop”, “claro”, “nada”, “bien”.</p> <p><strong>5. No hagas siempre las mismas preguntas</strong></p> <p>Un gran ahuyentador de niños es la vieja pregunta predecible: “¿Cómo estuvo tu día?”. Sé creativo. ¡Renueva las preguntas para que tu hijo sepa que estás interesado!</p> <p><strong>6. Tómate un momento y escucha</strong></p> <p>En el nanosegundo en el que tu hijo menciona ALGO relacionado con la escuela, presta mucha atención. Captura esa pequeña pepita de información y haz que parezca una mina de oro. Los niños se abren más cuando ven interés.</p> <p><strong>7. Estira la conversación con “fórmulas de invitación”</strong></p> <p>Cuando tu hijo comparta algún dato, intenta usar el “método de estiramiento”. No le insistas, pero haz este tipo de comentarios: “¿En serio?”, “¿Sí?”, “¡No lo puedo creer!”, “¡Guau!”. No son amenazantes e invitan a un diálogo.</p> <p><strong>8. Repite partes de la charla</strong></p> <p>Prueba repetir partes de la conversación. Niño: “Jugué en el columpio”. Tú: “Jugaste en el columpio”. El truco consiste en repetir una parte de modo interesante para que tu hijo se abra y cuente más.</p> <p><strong>9. Haz que tu casa sea lugar de reunión con sus amigos</strong></p> <p>Muchos padres aseguran que obtienen más información de la escuela a través de amigos de sus hijos que de sus propios hijos. Así que invita a tu casa a los amigos de tu hijo. Llena el refrigerador de comida. Arma una pequeña cancha de básquetbol (o lo que haga falta para retener a esos niños en la casa). Muéstrate amigable (no invasivo) con sus amigos. Verás que no solo los amigos cuentan más, sino que también tu hijo se sumará a la conversación.</p> <p><strong>10. Visita el sitio web de la escuela</strong></p> <p>Mantente al tanto de lo que está ocurriendo en la escuela de tu hijo: lee los boletines informativos de los maestros, haz clic en el calendario de la escuela, lee el programa de actividades y el menú. Así podrás hacerle preguntas específicas a tu hijo sobre su día.</p> <p><em>Este blog fue publicado por primera vez en el sitio web de Michele Borba. <a href="http://micheleborba.com/blog/getting-kids-to-open-up-about-their-school-day/">Haz clic aquí</a> para obtener más consejos e información de Borba.</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:07:59.237
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:57:49.053
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL How to Get Kids to Open Up About Their School Day
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 3F4DF880-3539-11E4-B65A0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2014-09-05 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER There are ways to get children to talk about their school day and even give us a clue as to what’s going on in their world. The trick is to use a few different communication strategies.
TEASERES ¿Sientes que estás en una inquisición cuando intentas averiguar cómo le fue a tu hijo en la escuela?
TEASERIMAGE 828A6A80-2437-11E7-BDE80050569A4B6C
TITLE How to Get Kids to Open Up About Their School Day
TITLEES Qué hacer para que los niños hablen sobre su día en la escuela
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

obnoxious teen

Risk-taking and the Teen Brain

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/10OIKTs
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>During adolescence, your child’s body matures and she becomes more self-sufficient and independent. These years also bring dramatic hormonal fluctuations, greater peer pressure, increased access to drugs, alcohol, sex, and the risk of unsafe driving practices. The problem is that the part of the brain that will in later years guide her logical thinking, judgment, prioritizing, and risk-assessment has yet to literally “get it together.” This can be a setup for disaster.</p> <p>The neural networksin the brain that will ultimately guide your child’s self-control and goal-directed behavior are called <em>executive functions</em>. These circuits are located in the prefrontal cortex, which is the last part of the brain to mature.</p> <p>Until your teen’s brain matures, which won’t happen until she’s well into her twenties, she may be more impulsive and less logic-driven. Decisions you consider unreasonable and behaviors you know are dangerous may not be seen that way by your teen because of her still-developing brain. This body over brain influence puts her at risk for engaging in perilous behaviors, such as driving while talking on her cell phone, texting, or when under the influence of drugs or alcohol.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Learn more about how you can support your teen's social and emotional development.</a></p> <p>Teenagers are three to four times more likely to die from risk-taking and accidents than non-elderly adults due to lapses in judgment and illogical decision-making. Adolescence is a critical time for you to help your teen build the self-awareness to resist and avoid high-risk behavior. Here are some strategies that can help you improve your adolescent’s judgment while her executive functions are still under construction.</p> <p><strong>Give Responsibilities:</strong> Give her opportunities to make choices, explore options, and learn from both the successes and authentic consequences of her choices. This means selecting responsibilities or decisions for her that are challenging, but where failure would not have harmful outcomes. If she asks for your advice, offer to be a supportive listener but not a director. The goal is for her to develop his judgment, so don’t jump in with corrections or advice. That will deprive her of owning the learning experience. Don’t chastise her if her outcome is unsuccessful. Rather, encourage her insights into what went wrong and what she might do differently next time.</p> <p><strong>Goal-Planning:</strong> Your adolescent also needs guidance to become aware of the potential consequences of his actions, and to resist making impulsive decisions or those based on peer influence. You can help him build these skill sets by providing opportunities for him to set personal goals and create a plan on how to achieve them. One way to do this is to ask him to write out a schedule of his plans that includes information about progress points and expectations. Join him in revisiting the plan periodically. Be positive and invite him to make adjustments. Explain to him that most professionals know that initial plans are just estimates and they plan for and make adjustments in response to their experiences along the way.</p> <p><strong>Decision-Making:</strong> Involve your teen in family decisions, like planning vacation activities, or coming up with community service ideas. In doing this, she can experience the satisfaction of planning the cost analysis, travel time, and schedule within a designated budget – such as a trip to a waterpark not far from your designated travel route.</p> <p><strong>Critical Analysis:</strong> Get your child involved in analyzing big decisions for the family. For instance, you can ask him to come up with the financial benefits of buying the family car that he wants. As you guide him to reliable consumer resources, he’ll have the “ah-ha” experience that not every advertisement is the absolute truth just because it appears to be presented as a fact.</p> <p><strong>Building Self-Control:</strong> Many teens are passionate about activities like video games and social media platforms, which can reduce their interest in academics, family time, and healthy eating and sleeping habits. If this sounds like your teen, you can use her passion as an opportunity to help your teen build self-control. Collaborate with her on a plan to cut back instead of just prohibiting any time spent at the pursuit. Help her find strategies to resist playing the game or going online whenever she feels like it with a planned schedule for use. With this approach you are building her skills of analyzing and recognizing the triggers or “risk factors” that limit her ability to resist temptation. This impulse control can lead to her decision not to read a text message when driving at a time when that choice literally saves her life.</p> <p><strong>Prioritize and Plan Ahead:</strong> Teachable moments are opportunities for building your child’s awareness of consequences. For example, if your teen forgets to mention he needs a poster board for a project until the night before it’s due, he’s showing his underdeveloped ability to prioritize. A teachable moment is lost if your teen experiences no <em>authentic </em>consequences for his failure to plan. Being grounded or losing privileges can be punishments, but this will not help build his brain’s ability to prioritize. He will learn more if you resist your desire to rescue him from a low grade and have him experience the real world consequences of his actions (or inaction) that are enforced by his teacher. Points off his grade now will have a direct impact on the planning, prioritizing, and goal-directed executive functions skills he needs for his next project and his future success. Just remind yourself these types of consequences will probably increase the likelihood that he will have a useable spare tire when he gets a late night flat on a rural road. </p> <p><em><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318">Judy Willis</a>, M.D., M.Ed. is a neurologist, former classroom teacher, and author of books for educators and parents. She is also one of the experts on the <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Social &amp; Emotional Development</a> section that was recently launched on the Parent Toolkit. </em></p>
BODYES <p>Durante la adolescencia, tu hijo madura y se vuelve más independiente y autosuficiente. Estos años también traen drásticos cambios hormonales, mayor presión de los pares, mayor acceso a las drogas, el alcohol y el sexo, y conductas de manejo imprudente. El problema es que la parte del cerebro que en el futuro guiará el pensamiento lógico, el juicio, el establecimiento de prioridades y la evaluación de riesgos todavía tiene que madurar. Y esto puede ser la receta para el desastre.</p> <p>Las redes neuronales del cerebro que regulan el autocontrol y la conducta orientada a objetivos se llaman <em>funciones ejecutivas</em>. Estos circuitos se encuentran en la corteza prefrontal, que es la última sección del cerebro en madurar.</p> <p>Hasta que el cerebro del adolescente madura, cosa que no ocurre hasta bien entrados los 20, será más impulsivo y menos lógico. Las decisiones que tú consideras irrazonables y las conductas que sabes que son peligrosas no son vistas de este modo por tu hijo adolescente porque su cerebro todavía está en desarrollo. Esta influencia del cuerpo sobre el cerebro los pone en riesgo, ya que ejecutan conductas peligrosas, como conducir mientras hablan por teléfono o envían mensajes de texto, o después de haber consumido drogas o alcohol.</p> <p>Los adolescentes tienen de tres a cuatro veces más probabilidades de morir a causa de la toma de riesgos y de los accidentes que los adultos no ancianos que incurren en lapsus de criterio y toman decisiones ilógicas. La adolescencia es un momento clave para que ayudes a tu hijo a desarrollar el conocimiento de sí mismo para resistirse y evitar las conductas de alto riesgo. Estas son algunas estrategias que pueden ayudarte a mejorar el criterio de tu hijo adolescente mientras sus funciones ejecutivas todavía están en desarrollo.</p> <p><strong>Asignación de responsabilidades:</strong> ofrécele a tu hijo la posibilidad de hacer elecciones, de explorar las opciones y de aprender tanto de los hechos como de las verdaderas consecuencias de sus elecciones. Esto significa seleccionar por ellos las responsabilidades o decisiones que presenten un desafío pero, que si tuvieran un resultado adverso, no serían perjudiciales. Si piden tu consejo, actúa como oyente y no como director. El objetivo es que desarrollen su criterio, de modo que no te precipites haciendo correcciones o dando consejos, ya que esto los privará de la experiencia de aprendizaje. No castigues a tu hijo si el resultado no es exitoso, más bien, aliéntalo a analizar qué fue lo que falló y qué podría hacer diferente la próxima vez.</p> <p><strong>Planificación de objetivos:</strong> tu hijo adolescente necesita un poco de orientación para poder darse cuenta de las posibles consecuencias de sus acciones y para resistirse a tomar decisiones impulsivas o influenciadas por sus pares. Puedes ayudarlo a desarrollar estas habilidades ofreciéndole la posibilidad de establecer objetivos personales y de desarrollar un plan para alcanzarlos. Una forma de lograr esto es pedirle que prepare una lista de sus planes y que incluya información sobre las etapas de progreso y las expectativas. Revisa este plan junto con tu hijo de manera periódica, intenta ser positivo y sugiérele hacer algunos ajustes. Explícale que la mayoría de los profesionales saben que los planes iniciales son solo una estimación, y que se van modificando y ajustando en respuesta al desarrollo de las experiencias.</p> <p><strong>Toma de decisiones:</strong> involucra a los adolescentes en las decisiones familiares, por ejemplo, planificar actividades durante las vacaciones o pensar en ideas para ayudar a la comunidad. Al hacer esto, los jóvenes experimentarán la sensación de satisfacción de analizar costos, planificar los tiempos de viaje y las actividades con un presupuesto limitado, por ejemplo, una visita a un parque acuático cercano al lugar donde viajarán.</p> <p><strong>Análisis crítico:</strong> haz que tus hijos participen en el análisis de las grandes decisiones familiares. Por ejemplo, puedes pedirle que investigue y analice los beneficios financieros de comprar ese auto que tanto quiere. Mientras lo guías y le indicas fuentes de información confiable, tu hijo atravesará la experiencia del descubrimiento, al darse cuenta de que no todas las publicidades son la verdad absoluta solo porque presentan las cosas como un hecho consumado.</p> <p><strong>Desarrollo del autocontrol:</strong> muchos adolescentes son apasionados de los videojuegos y de las redes sociales, lo que puede disminuir su interés en las actividades académicas, la familia, llevar una alimentación saludable o tener buenos hábitos de sueño. Si esto describe exactamente a tu hijo adolescente, puedes usar su pasión como una oportunidad para ayudarlo a desarrollar el autocontrol. En vez de prohibirle que realice esas actividades, consensúen un plan para reducir el tiempo que dedica a ellas. Ayúdale a encontrar estrategias que le permitan resistirse a jugar videojuegos o a conectarse a las redes sociales en cualquier momento, como por ejemplo un plan de actividades. Aplicando este enfoque, lo ayudarás a desarrollar sus habilidades de análisis y a reconocer los disparadores o “factores de riesgo” que limitan su capacidad para resistirse a la tentación. El control de los impulsos le permitirá tomar la decisión de no leer un mensaje de texto mientras está manejando, una elección que, literalmente, salvará su vida.</p> <p><strong>Priorización y planificación:</strong> los momentos que pueden ser aprovechados pedagógicamente son oportunidades que permiten crear conciencia sobre las consecuencias. Por ejemplo, si tu hijo se acuerda de avisarte de que necesita una cartulina para un proyecto la noche anterior a la fecha de entrega, no está mostrando la habilidad de priorizar. Se pierde la oportunidad pedagógica si tu hijo no experimenta las verdaderas consecuencias por su falta de planificación. Perder algunos privilegios o no poder salir con amigos pueden ser formas de castigarle, pero esto no ayudará a que su cerebro desarrolle la capacidad de asignar prioridades. Aprenderá mucho más si resistes tu deseo de salir al rescate para evitar que le pongan una mala nota y le permites experimentar las consecuencias de sus acciones (o inacción) en el mundo real, en este caso en la persona de su maestro. Recibir una nota más baja ahora tendrá un impacto directo en las funciones ejecutivas de planificación, priorización y consecución de objetivos que necesita para su próximo proyecto escolar y su éxito en el futuro. Solo tienes que recordar que este tipo de consecuencias probablemente incrementará las posibilidades de que contaremos con un neumático de repuesto en buenas condiciones cuando tengamos una pinchadura en un camino rural en medio de la noche.</p> <p><em>Judy Willis, M.D., M.Ed. es neuróloga, exmaestra y autora de libros para educadores y padres. También es una de las expertas que participa en la sección de Desarrollo social y emocional que hemos incorporado recientemente en Parent Toolkit.</em></p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY andyweishaar_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:08:10.703
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:59:38.723
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Risk-taking and the Teen Brain
LASTUPDATEDBY andyweishaar_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 88BDDE90-4FBF-11E4-90E20050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2014-11-03 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER During adolescence, your child’s body matures and she becomes more self-sufficient and independent. These years also bring dramatic hormonal fluctuations, greater peer pressure, increased access to drugs, alcohol, sex, and the risk of unsafe driving practices.
TEASERES Durante la adolescencia, tu hijo madura y se vuelve más independiente y autosuficiente.
TEASERIMAGE 5F902EF0-2439-11E7-8CD00050569A4B6C
TITLE Risk-taking and the Teen Brain
TITLEES La toma de riesgos y el cerebro de los adolescentes
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Mother Daughter Walking and Talking

3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2flNyHp
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>What are college admissions officers looking for in the volunteering and service section of your student’s application?</p> <p>Turns out it’s not quantity or prestige, but rather, <em>meaning</em>.</p> <p>In fact, many educators and deans of admission at some of the country’s most selective schools contributed to or endorsed a report published last January by the <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/">Making Caring Common Project</a> at the Harvard Graduate School of Education: <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/20160120_mcc_ttt_report_interactive.pdf"><em>Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern For Others And the Common Good Through College Admissions</em></a>.</p> <p>Harvard Lecturer Richard Weissbourd was the lead author of the report. He says finding a sustained, meaningful service experience is something all young people should have, not just for college applications, but for life.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=DB033AA0-609E-11E6-A4B10050569A5318">RELATED: Adding Caring to Your Kids College Application</a></p> <p>As service and volunteering tend to be on the minds of many people during this time of year, here are three ways parents can encourage our kids to find meaningful ways to give back.</p> <p><strong>1. </strong><strong>Help your kid find their authentic voice and passions.</strong></p> <p>The first step is having a conversation, or more likely, many conversations, with your kid about what really makes them tick. Taking the time to listen to your kid is not only a great chance for bonding, but an opportunity to learn about the person they are becoming.</p> <p>“Let your kid take initiative,” Weissbourd says. “Help guide them, but listen to their input and what they have to say. Ask your child to imagine a variety of service experiences and how they fit into them.”</p> <p>There are countless service experiences that take many different forms, ideologies, political perspectives, and faiths. While sometimes it may seem like your student has to get involved in everything, it is really an exciting moment for your kid to discover what their values are, Weissbourd says. Taking a step back to recognize this will be extremely beneficial in the long run.</p> <p>“It’s a really important ethical parenting moment and you really have to come to terms with what’s important to you,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>We all want what’s best for our kids. Sometimes we dream they will attend the college we went to, or that they will have everything we didn’t, or they will love to volunteer at an organization we’re passionate about. But our expectations of our kids shouldn’t cloud our understanding of what they need to thrive, Weissbourd says.</p> <p>“Too often kids think about what colleges want and how do I fit that,” Weissbourd said. “Parents have to help kids find what works for them and fits them.”</p> <p><strong>2. </strong><strong>Look for quality in service opportunities over quantity.</strong></p> <p>This sentiment is entwined in so many aspects of life, and it remains true for service, too.</p> <p>“It’s not the number of activities you do, it’s the quality of engagement,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>One practical way to help your kid find their own quality service opportunities is to actually limit your child in the number of activities they take part in. Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">suggests</a> asking the questions: “Why is this activity meaningful to you? What goals does it achieve? What have you learned about yourself, others, and your communities?” These questions force your child to pick what is most valuable to them and to think about why that is.</p> <p>Another way to emphasize quality is to not think about college applications at all! Some parents may scoff at this idea, but it will actually benefit your kid to choose activities simply by what they are passionate about.</p> <p>Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">advises</a> parents to “Encourage your children to choose activities that they have a legitimate interest in—not those that they think admission officers will value.”</p> <p>Ironically, this is what ends up shining through the most on the college application, Weissbourd says.</p> <p>And an added benefit? When your child is more aware of their own passions and values, they will be so much more prepared for the college application process.</p> <p><strong>3. </strong><strong>Encourage your kid to find community with their service.</strong></p> <p>When engaging in service, use the model, “Do with, not for,” Weissbourd says. It is a slippery slope between service for the greater good, and service for appearance sake.</p> <p>“[As a culture] we have demoted concern for others, concern for the common good and ethical engagement in the college admissions process,” Weissbourd says.</p> <p>Parents can help kids by encouraging their students to get involved in service that has a lot of diversity. Explain to your kids that you are not a “savior,” but rather forming community with people, often times different from yourself, for a greater cause.</p> <p>Making Caring Common <a href="http://mcc.gse.harvard.edu/files/gse-mcc/files/ttt_parent_tips_for_web.pdf?m=1460560384">says</a>, “Experiences in diverse groups are not only important for your children ethically and emotionally, but can enable your children to develop key cognitive skills, including problem-solving skills and group awareness, that are key to success in work and life.”</p> <p>And mostly importantly, talk to your kid about what makes working within a diverse community both challenging and rewarding.</p> <p>“Parents work hard to raise kind and empathetic kids,” Weissbourd says. “What’s challenging is to raise kids who are kind and empathetic to people outside of their immediate circle of concern. These service experiences play a big part in that. It can be a really meaningful rite of passage.”</p> <p> </p> <p><em>This piece is part of the Parent Toolkit’s Week of Giving. Click <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A17F9E20-516C-11E3-839E0050569A5318">here</a> to read more inspirational stories.</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Follow the Parent Toolkit on </strong><a href="http://bit.ly/2bQX6cp" target="_blank"><strong>Facebook</strong></a><strong>, </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/educationnation" target="_blank"><strong>Twitter</strong></a><strong>, and </strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/theparenttoolkit/" target="_blank"><strong>Instagram</strong></a><strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong> </strong></p>
BODYES <p>¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?</p> <p>No se trata de cantidad ni de prestigio, sino de significado.</p> <p>De hecho, muchos educadores y decanos de admisión en algunas de las instituciones más selectivas del país contribuyeron o respaldaron un informe publicado en enero por Making Caring Common Project de Harvard Graduate School of Education: Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern For Others And the Common Good Through College Admissions (Cambio de rumbo: Una preocupación inspiradora por el otro y el bien común a través de las admisiones universitarias).</p> <p>Richard Weissbourd, profesor de Harvard, fue el autor principal de este informe. Asegura que encontrar una experiencia de servicio sostenida y significativa es una vivencia que todos los jóvenes deberían tener, no solo para ingresar en una universidad, sino para su vida.</p> <p>Como el servicio y el voluntariado suelen estar muy presentes en la cabeza de muchas personas en esta época del año, aquí encontrarás tres formas en que los padres pueden incentivar a sus hijos a encontrar formas de ayudar que sean significativas.</p> <h4>1. Ayuda a tu hijo a encontrar su identidad y pasiones verdaderas.</h4> <p>El primer paso sería tener una conversación, en realidad, muchas conversaciones con tu hijo sobre lo que realmente le interesa. Tomarte el tiempo para escuchar a tu hijo no es solo una gran oportunidad de unión entre ambos, sino también la posibilidad de conocer en qué persona se está convirtiendo.</p> <p>“Deja que tu hijo tome la iniciativa”, sugiere Weissbourd. “Oriéntalo, pero escucha lo que tiene para decirte. Pídele que imagine una serie de experiencias de servicio y cómo se vería en ellas”.</p> <p>Hay innumerables experiencias de servicio que toman diversas formas, ideologías, perspectivas políticas y creencias religiosas. Si bien, a veces, parece que tu hijo debe participar en todo, es un momento ideal para que descubra cuáles son sus valores, sostiene Weissbourd. Tomarse un tiempo para reconocer esto será extremadamente beneficioso a largo plazo.</p> <p>“Es un momento realmente importante en términos de ética en cuanto al rol de ser padre o madre, y debes tener en claro qué es relevante para ti”, agrega Weissbourd.</p> <p>Todos queremos lo mejor para nuestros hijos. A veces soñamos con que asistan a nuestra universidad, o que tengan todo lo que no tuvimos, o que les encantará trabajar como voluntarios en una organización que nos apasiona. Pero las expectativas que depositemos en nuestros hijos no deberían nublar nuestra opinión de lo que ellos necesitan para avanzar, comenta Weissbourd.</p> <p>“Los jóvenes suelen detenerse en lo que buscan las universidades y cómo podrían adaptarse a eso”, explica Weissbourd. “Los padres tienen que ayudar a sus hijos a encontrar aquello que funcione y se adapte a ellos”.</p> <h4>2. Busca calidad por sobre cantidad en las oportunidades de servicio.</h4> <p>Este concepto se entrelaza en innumerables aspectos de la vida, y el servicio no es la excepción.</p> <p>“No se trata de la cantidad de actividades que hagas, sino de la calidad del compromiso”, explica Weissbourd.</p> <p>Una manera práctica de ayudar a tu hijo a encontrar sus oportunidades de dar un servicio de calidad es limitar la cantidad de actividades en las que participa. Making Caring Common sugiere hacer estas preguntas: “¿Por qué esta actividad es significativa para ti? ¿Qué objetivos cumple? ¿Qué aprendiste de ti, de otros y de tus comunidades?”. Estas preguntas obligan a tu hijo a elegir aquello que sea más valioso para él y a pensar en por qué lo es.</p> <p>Otra forma de enfatizar la calidad es no pensar en las solicitudes universitarias. Algunos padres podrían reírse de esta idea, pero así tu hijo podrá elegir actividades solo teniendo en cuenta lo que le apasiona.</p> <p>Making Caring Common les aconseja a los padres que “incentiven a sus hijos a elegir actividades en las que tengan un interés legítimo, no aquellas en las que creen que valorarán los responsables de las admisiones”.</p> <p>Irónicamente, esto es lo que termina destacándose en las solicitudes universitarias, describe Weissbourd.</p> <p>¿Otro beneficio? Cuando tu hijo es más consciente de sus pasiones y valores, estará mucho más preparado para el proceso de admisión universitaria.</p> <h4>3. Incentiva a tu hijo a encontrar a su comunidad en el servicio elegido.</h4> <p>Cuando elija un servicio, ten presente la frase “Haz con, no por”, sugiere Weissbourd. Hay una línea muy delgada entre involucrarse en un servicio para el bien común o hacerlo por las apariencias.</p> <p>“[Como cultura] hemos menospreciado el valor de la preocupación por el otro, por el bien común y por el ejercicio ético en el proceso de admisiones universitarias”, afirma Weissbourd.</p> <p>Los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos estimulándolos a que participen en actividades que tengan que ver con la diversidad. Explícale a tu hijo que no eres un “salvador”, pero sí que formas parte de una comunidad con personas que suelen ser diferentes a ti y que se unen por una causa mayor.</p> <p>Making Caring Common agrega: “Las experiencias que tu hijo pueda vivir en grupos diversos no solo son importantes desde una óptica ética y emocional, sino que pueden ayudarlo a desarrollar habilidades cognitivas clave, como la capacidad de resolver problemas y tener conciencia de grupo, fundamentales para triunfar en el trabajo y en la vida”.</p> <p>Y, lo más importante, habla con tu hijo de lo desafiante y gratificante que resulta trabajar dentro de una comunidad diversa.</p> <p>“Los padres se esfuerzan para criar jóvenes generosos y empáticos”, considera Weissbourd. “El desafío está en criar jóvenes que sean generosos y empáticos con las personas que están fuera de su círculo más cercano. Estas experiencias de servicio tienen un rol muy importante al respecto. Pueden ser un ritual de transición de vital importancia”.</p> <p><em>Este artículo es parte de la sección Week of Giving de Parent Toolkit. Haz clic aquí para leer otras historias inspiradoras. </em> </p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,03CEEDAC-5056-9A4B-6C55C606D8A092FF,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
CMLABEL 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:52.363
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:28:25.39
DESCRIPTION Volunteering and service may help with college applications, but it enhances lives.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit on how to help high schoolers find meaning in service.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Here are some ways that you can help your high schooler find meaning in service:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0AA89B10-AD11-11E6-89870050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03CEEDAC-5056-9A4B-6C55C606D8A092FF
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-11-26 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER <p>As service and volunteering tend to be on the minds of many people during this time of year, here are three ways parents can encourage our kids to find meaningful ways to give back.</p>
SHORTTEASERES ¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Service looks good on a college application, but this Harvard educator explains why quality is the key.
TEASERES ¿Qué buscan los responsables de las admisiones universitarias en la sección de voluntariado y servicio de la solicitud de ingreso de un estudiante?
TEASERIMAGE 4E7A7C10-1944-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE 3 Ways to Help High Schoolers Find Meaning in Service
TITLEES 3 formas para orientar a un estudiante de secundario a encontrar el significado en ayudar al prójimo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Explore some ways you can help your high schooler find meaning in service:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Health and Wellness

Proper nutrition, adequate sleep, and physical activity can all impact academic performance and overall mental and physical wellness.

Nutrition

Motivate your teen to establish healthy eating habits by teaching them how they can select the healthier foods including fruits, vegetables, protein and more.

Physical Health

Support your teen’s growing body by encouraging physical activity and sleep. Learn how much they need, and advice for encouraging healthy behavior.

Recommended

Serious mom & son

Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Mental Health

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1t6GdPj
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p class="Body">Mental health is one of those topics that is so broad and so complicated that many parents don’t know where to start when talking to kids. Some parents have family histories and therefore a reference point and example to draw upon when talking, while others must rely on news reports of tragedies. We spoke with a panel of our experts to get their advice on how to talk to kids about mental health, and how to know when to have those discussions. We’ve compiled their advice as part of our ongoing series on tough talks — making difficult conversations a bit easier.</p> <blockquote>“The way to bridge into the topics is through concern,” explains Rutgers Social-Emotional Learning Lab Director Maurice Elias. “Don’t label the process. I wouldn’t talk about anxiety or depression, I wouldn’t use any of those terms with my child.”</blockquote> <p><span class="white"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Learn more about ways you can nurture your child's social and emotional well-being</a>.</span></p> <p class="Body">And just knowing some of the warning signs of mental health issues, like suicide and depression, can help guide parents as to when to have the conversations.</p> <blockquote>“There are some of the warning signs of suicide and depression: declining school performance, loss of pleasure in social activities, changes in appetite or sleep, agitation or irritability, and substance abuse,” explains Center for Adolescent Research and Education director Stephen Wallace. “Just as we teach our children to look both ways before they cross the street or to brush their teeth before bedtime, we need to arm them with the truth about depression and suicide.”</blockquote> <p>The truth as told by statistics is staggering. According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide is the number three cause of death for youth ages 10 to 24, and in the past year, 17 percent of high school students surveyed said they seriously considered suicide. And yet, many parents and kids don’t talk about mental health issues together.</p> <blockquote>"Many kids who experience depression think they will always feel bad, and that is definitely not the case," explains Wallace. "This is why I feel that it is absolutely necessary for parents to tell their children that there will be better days.”</blockquote> <p>With the transition to and through adolescence, many teens appear more moody and emotional. How are parents to know when a moody teenager has moved from simply being a moody teenager into an area that is cause for concern? Parenting expert and education psychologist Michele Borba tells parents “No one knows your child better than you. Trust your instincts. If you think something is wrong, you’re probably right.” She also recommends using a measurement she calls the “too index.”</p> <blockquote>“Look at your kid’s behavior. You know their normal behavior and moodiness and his normal obnoxiousness,” Borba explains. “But is it lasting too long, becoming too intense and spilling over into too many other areas, like the classroom, social world; and are teachers talking about it? And your household is becoming too troublesome and you’re walking on eggshells. How long? Every day for at least two weeks is a huge warning sign. Too long, too much, too often.”</blockquote> <p>There may be less obvious clues about your child’s emotional state. Kansas City-based pediatrician Dr. Natasha Burgert recommends monitoring your child’s online searches and web browsing history for warning signs like searching “what is depression.”</p> <blockquote>“I have kids that learn about the easiest pills to take to make you fall asleep. Or how to cut themselves on a YouTube video,” says Dr. Burgert</blockquote> <p>She also points out that while your teen may be searching and looking for advice, oftentimes that advice is coming from fellow teenagers — not a professional. If you are concerned your child does have a mental health problem, like anxiety or depression, Dr. Burgert recommends seeing a professional sooner rather than later.</p> <blockquote>“There’s nothing worse than having a patient come in and say we’ve seen this for about a year and we just came in and found a knife,” says Dr. Burgert.</blockquote> <p>It might be hard to start the discussion with your child but our experts overwhelmingly recommend speaking up sooner rather than later. One of the best strategies is to approach concerns about mental health as though it is equivalent to concerns about other health issues like diabetes or asthma. You may want to point out what you’re seeing and note your concern or worry. If you start the conversation with your concerns, your child may feel it is less of an attack and more a genuine care for their wellbeing.</p> <blockquote>“I would start with ‘I’ve noticed….’” explains school counselor Shari Sevier. “‘I’ve noticed you’re in your room a lot, what is going on?’ Ask more open ended questions than yes/no. Because open-ended questions can get them talking.”</blockquote> <blockquote>&lt;p"&gt;<em>“</em>The next thing you want to say is that you’re willing to talk about it,” Rutgers Social-Emotional Learning Lab Director Maurice Elias says. “That’s where it has to start in the beginning. I think that it’s not realistic to expect your child to immediately want to open up and talk about their issues and problems.”</blockquote> <p>It’s not just depression that can affect teenagers. Anxiety is another contributor to mental health issues for teens. According to the National Institutes of Mental Health, 8 percent of adolescents have an anxiety disorder. It’s not surprising when you look at the statistics found by the American Psychological Association — where teens report being more stressed out than adults.</p> <blockquote>“There is a perception about the right courses, the right schools and that can cause tremendous anxiety and if they don’t achieve they feel like failures,” explains Sevier.  “We, as parents, need to be careful about pressure. It’s fine to say, ‘Do you feel like I’m putting too much pressure on you?’”</blockquote> <p>There are many ways to help children and teens with stress, from helping them find coping strategies that work for them to cutting back on the amount of activities and extracurricular activities they’re signed up for. Sleep can also be a big contributor to a child’s sense of stress, so trying to keep your teen on a healthy sleep schedule can also help relieve stress.</p> <p>Above all, your child needs your guidance that no matter where they are right now, it will get better. And you can help him or her get better by finding professional help through a counselor or therapist and supporting your child through the difficult time. Even if your child does not have a diagnosed mental health condition, continuing to talk with your child will go a long way to supporting his or her overall mental health. While it may be especially challenging to get teens to open up,  our experts say don’t discount the effect your willingness to talk will have on them.</p> <blockquote>“They need to hear from us that someday, something bad will happen, and it will get better and people can help you," says Wallace. "Parents are afraid to raise the issue of depression and suicide because they think it’s contagious, the healthy way to deal with it is to talk about it.”</blockquote> <p><em>This is the fourth post in our week-long series — Tough Talks— where we’ve surveyed a handful of our Parent Toolkit experts to see what they recommend for parents to make tough conversations go more smoothly. Tomorrow we’ll tackle the topic of drugs and alcohol. </em></p> <p><em>If you or someone you know would like more information about the issue, please visit <a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/teenmentalhealth.html">http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/teenmentalhealth.html</a>. If you or someone you know needs help, please call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). </em></p>
BODYES <p>Charlas difíciles: cómo hablar con tus hijos sobre la salud mental</p> <p>La salud mental es uno de esos temas tan amplios y complejos, que muchos padres no saben por dónde comenzar. Algunos padres tienen antecedentes familiares y, por lo tanto, un punto de referencia y un ejemplo al cual recurrir cuando hablan sobre estos temas. Otros padres deben depender de los reportajes y noticias que se publiquen. Hablamos con nuestros expertos para pedirles consejo sobre cómo hablar a los niños sobre la salud mental y cuál es el mejor momento para iniciar esas charlas. Hemos recopilado sus consejos como parte de nuestra serie permanente de artículos sobre temas difíciles para allanar el camino a los padres.</p> <blockquote>“Una buena forma de encarar estos temas es desde la preocupación”, explica Maurice Elias, Director del laboratorio de aprendizaje socio-emocional Rutgers. “No hay que etiquetar los procesos. Yo no hablaría de ansiedad o depresión, no usaría ninguno de esos términos con mi hijo”.</blockquote> <p>Conoce más formas en las que puedes contribuir al bienestar social y emocional de tus hijos.</p> <p>Reconocer algunas de las señales de alerta sobre los problemas de salud mental, como el suicidio o la depresión, puede servir como guía para los padres para saber cuándo es el momento indicado para entablar estas conversaciones.</p> <blockquote>“Estas son algunas de las señales de alerta del suicidio y de la depresión: el rendimiento escolar que decae, las actividades sociales ya no resultan placenteras, cambios en el apetito o en el sueño, nerviosismo o irritabilidad, y consumo de drogas”, explica Stephen Wallace, director del Centro de investigación y educación para adolescentes. “Así como le enseñamos a nuestros hijos que deben mirar a ambos lados antes de cruzar la calle o a cepillarse los dientes antes de ir a dormir, tenemos que ser sinceros y hablar con la verdad sobre la depresión y el suicidio”.</blockquote> <p>Las estadísticas son impactantes. Según los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades, el suicidio es la tercera causa de muerte entre los jóvenes de 10 a 24 años. El año pasado, el 17% de los estudiantes secundarios encuestados dijeron que habían pensado seriamente en suicidarse. A pesar de esto, muchos padres e hijos no conversan sobre estos temas.</p> <blockquote>“Muchos adolescentes que están transitando una depresión creen que siempre se sentirán mal, y eso no es para nada real”, explica Wallace. “Por eso creo que es absolutamente necesario que los padres les expliquen a sus hijos que todo mejorará”.</blockquote> <p>Durante la adolescencia, y en la transición hacia ella, muchos jóvenes parecen estar más malhumorados y sensibles. Pero ¿cómo hace un padre para saber cuándo un adolescente de carácter cambiante ya pasa a un estado de ánimo por el que deberíamos preocuparnos? La psicóloga experta en crianza y educación, Michele Borba, dice a los padres: “Nadie conoce a sus hijos mejor que ustedes. Confíen en sus instintos. Si creen que algo anda mal, probablemente tengan razón”. También recomienda usar un patrón de referencia que ella llama el “índice demasiado”.</p> <blockquote>“Analiza la conducta de tu hijo. Tú conoces su comportamiento normal, sus cambios de humor y su nivel normal de fastidio”, explica Borba. “Pero si dura demasiado tiempo, se intensifica demasiado y comienza a influir en otras áreas, como el salón de clases o su grupo social; si los maestros te lo hacen notar, si estar en casa se está volviendo demasiado problemático y andas con pies de plomo... deberías preguntarte cuánto tiempo hace que tu hijo está así. Si ha estado así todos los días, durante al menos dos semanas, es una gran señal de advertencia. Demasiado tiempo, demasiada intensidad, demasiada frecuencia”.</blockquote> <p>También existen indicios un poco menos evidentes sobre el estado emocional de tu hijo. La Dra. Natasha Burgert, pediatra de Kansas City, recomienda vigilar las búsquedas en línea y el historial de navegación para detectar síntomas, como por ejemplo si busca “qué es la depresión”.</p> <blockquote>“Tengo pacientes que saben cuál es la mejor píldora para dormir o qué es la autolesión con solo mirar un video en YouTube”, cuenta la Dra. Burgert.</blockquote> <p>También destaca que es posible que tu hijo esté buscando asesoramiento, pero que, muchas veces, esos consejos provienen de otros adolescentes, y no de profesionales. Si te preocupa que tu hijo padezca algún tipo de problema emocional, como ansiedad o depresión, la Dra. Burgert recomienda consultar con un profesional lo antes posible.</p> <blockquote>“No hay nada peor que atender a un paciente y que te cuenten que hace alrededor de un año que está así, y que de pronto, un día, lo encontraron con cuchillo”, dice la Dra. Burgert.</blockquote> <p>Hablar sobre estos temas con tus hijos puede ser difícil, pero nuestros expertos recomiendan en forma unánime que conviene hacerlo cuanto antes. Una de las mejores estrategias para abordar cualquier inquietud sobre los trastornos emocionales es hacerlo como si se tratara de cualquier otro problema de salud, como la diabetes o el asma. Puedes mencionar lo que ves y expresar tu interés o preocupación. Si comienzas la charla expresando tu interés, tu hijo no sentirá que lo estás atacando, sino que realmente te preocupas por su bienestar.</p> <blockquote>“Por ejemplo, se puede usar la frase “Noté que...”, explica la consejera escolar Shari Sevier. “Noté que pasas mucho tiempo en tu habitación ¿que está pasando?” Haz preguntas más abiertas para que la respuesta no sea simplemente sí o no. Este tipo de preguntas te ayudará para que comiencen a hablar”. <br /> “Lo siguiente es decirles que estás dispuesto a hablar sobre el tema”, aporta Maurice Elias, Director del laboratorio de aprendizaje socio-emocional Rutgers. “Allí es cuando tienes que comenzar de a poco y por el principio. No es realista esperar que tu hijo te cuente de inmediato todos sus problemas y comparta todas sus preocupaciones”.</blockquote> <p>Pero la depresión no es lo único que puede afectar a los adolescentes. La ansiedad es otra cara de los trastornos emocionales de los adolescentes. Según el Instituto Nacional de la Salud Mental, el 8% de los adolescentes padece algún tipo de trastorno de ansiedad. Lo cual no es sorprendente cuando se analizan las estadísticas de la Asociación Estadounidense de Psicología, donde se muestra que los adolescentes están más estresados que los adultos.</p> <blockquote>“La percepción que tienen sobre cuáles son las clases correctas, las escuelas adecuadas, y temas similares puede generar una ansiedad tremenda; y si no logran alcanzar los objetivos se sienten unos fracasados”, explica Sevier. “Como padres, debemos tener mucho cuidado con la presión que ejercemos. Debemos preguntarles “¿Te parece que te estoy presionando demasiado?”</blockquote> <p>Hay muchas formas en las que podemos ayudar a los niños y adolescentes con estrés; desde ayudarlos a encontrar técnicas y estrategias que les permitan lidiar con los problemas, hasta reducir la cantidad de actividades extracurriculares en las que participan. El sueño es un factor determinante en la sensación de estrés. Trata de que tu hijo duerma la cantidad de horas necesarias y así lo ayudarás a aliviar el estrés.</p> <p>Pero sobre todo, tu hijo necesita de tu guía. No importa en qué estado se encuentre ahora, todo mejorará. Puedes ayudarlo buscando el asesoramiento profesional de un consejero o terapeuta y acompañando a tu hijo en este momento difícil. Incluso si tu hijo no padece ninguna enfermedad mental diagnosticable, seguir hablando con él sobre estos temas será muy beneficioso para su salud mental. Si bien es muy difícil conseguir que los adolescentes se abran y hablen, nuestros expertos aconsejan no descartar el efecto que puede causar en ellos tu predisposición para conversar.</p> <blockquote>"Necesitan escuchar de nuestra propia boca que si bien pueden pasar cosas malas, todo tiene solución y hay gente que puede ayudarlos”, dice Wallace. “Los padres tienen miedo de traer a colación el tema de la depresión y el suicidio porque creen que es contagioso, pero la mejor forma, y la más saludable, para lidiar con estos temas es hablar sobre ellos”.</blockquote> <p><em>Esta es la cuarta publicación de nuestra serie semanal, Charlas difíciles, donde consultamos a nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones para que los padres puedan hablar en forma más cómoda sobre estos temas espinosos. Mañana trataremos el tema de las drogas y el alcohol.</em></p> <p><em>Si tú o alguien que conoces desea obtener más información sobre este tema, pueden visitar <a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/teenmentalhealth.html">http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/teenmentalhealth.html</a>. Si tú o alguien que conoces necesita ayuda, comunícate con la línea nacional de ayuda de prevención de suicidios al 1-800-273-TALK (8255).</em></p>
CATHTML F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
CMLABEL Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Mental Health
CREATEDBY christinafisher_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED [empty string]
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:43:58.53
DESCRIPTION Mental health is a crucial topic to talk about with kids. But where and when should you start?
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Mental health is a crucial topic to talk about with kids. But where and when should you start?
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Mental Health
LASTUPDATEDBY christinafisher_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID E03FE400-5A29-11E4-A1220050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-10-23 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Talk to Your Child About Mental Health
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER Mental health is a crucial topic to talk about with kids. But where and when should you start?
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Mental Health
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Mental health is one of those topics that is so broad and so complicated that many parents don’t know where to start when talking to kids. Some parents have family histories and therefore a reference point and example to draw upon when talking, while others must rely on news reports of tragedies. We spoke with a panel of our experts to get their advice on how to talk to kids about mental health, and how to know when to have those discussions. We’ve compiled their advice as part of our ongoing series on tough talks — making difficult conversations a bit easier.
TEASERES La salud mental es uno de esos temas tan amplios y complejos, que muchos padres no saben por dónde comenzar.
TEASERIMAGE 7330A4F0-2144-11E7-B3920050569A4B6C
TITLE Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Mental Health
TITLEES Charlas difíciles: cómo hablar con tus hijos sobre la salud mental
TWITTERTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about how to talk to your child about mental health:
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET #MentalHealth is a crucial topic to talk about with kids. But where and when should you start? (via @EducationNation)
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Father Son Talking

Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1sXEcTP
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Deciding when and how to talk to kids about alcohol and drug use can be a big decision. With all the other difficult conversations parents have with kids, this one might not be the most pressing on the agenda. But how your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have a life-long effect and serious consequences. To continue our series on these tough talks, we talked to a panel of our Parent Toolkit experts for their advice.</p> <blockquote>“The average age that many children start being exposed to alcohol is 13, some at 12; and now evidence is showing that this might be much earlier,” says Stephen Wallace, director of the Center for Adolescent Research and Education. “It’s important for parent to talk about these issues at different junctures, especially when these behaviors typically occur.”</blockquote> <p><span class="white"><span class="white"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Learn more about ways you can nurture your child's social and emotional well-being</a>.</span></span></p> <p>According to the Centers for Disease Control, 19 percent of high school students admitted to drinking more than a few sips of alcohol before the age of 13. When asked if they’d had at least one drink of alcohol in their lifetime, that number jumps to 66 percent. Our experts overwhelmingly recommend talking about alcohol as soon as possible, and many recommend starting in the later elementary years.</p> <blockquote>“There really is no guarantee that your child will not drink,” says parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba. “But you can produce a child who is less likely to binge drink or abuse alcohol at a younger and younger age. And here’s the secret – it’s called hands-on parenting.”</blockquote> <p>Part of that hands-on parenting is identifying your family’s values and making sure that as a role model, you stick to those values, says Borba. Children will learn from you at an early age, whether you need a drink after a rough day at work, or have to stock the fridge before having company come over. And beyond simply modeling responsible behavior, you should also communicate your values with your child. Just because you talked to them once, Borba says, doesn’t mean it’s going to stick. It needs to be an on-going conversation.</p> <blockquote>“In my research, I found that many boys have never talked to their parents about these issues,” explains Wallace. “Research shows that parents who do communicate their expectations have children who are more likely to meet those expectations.”</blockquote> <p>Try to work the conversations into every day interactions so they feel more natural. Wallace says a car ride is a perfect time to start a conversation; you essentially have a captive audience. Before bed works well too----anytime when you have more than 5 minutes to actually talk to each other. You can use lyrics in songs, or other things you pick up from your child’s culture, as a jumping off point for the conversation.</p> <blockquote>“Kids need to understand that this is something that adults do. If it’s something you want to do as an adult, you can do it,” explains Maurice Elias, director of the Rutgers Social-Emotional Learning Lab. He points out that the conversation may be slightly different if you live in a state that has recently legalized marijuana, like Colorado. Often, kids don’t see the risk involved with drugs that have recently been made legal. And nationwide, according to the CDC, 41 percent of high school students have tried marijuana at least once. Even in Colorado and other states, there’s still an age requirement for use.</blockquote> <blockquote>“It’s a different conversation. Kids have to understand that there’s a legal age that you can do this and that’s the law,” he says. “And if the law changes, then the age changes.”</blockquote> <p>Above all, the conversation needs to continue as your child ages and starts experimenting. Dr. Elias explains that parents should try to have a certain level of understanding, drawing on their own experience if necessary. Sometimes just remembering what it was like when you were growing up can have a profound effect on your ability to relate to your child. It’s likely that even if you didn’t experiment growing up, you had friends who did. When having the talk with your child, the overall agreement among our experts is that “just say no” isn’t a realistic conversation.</p> <blockquote>“If you close the door, and just say no, you run the risk of them saying yes,” explains education consultant Jennifer Miller. “Co-creating social rules together is the best policy. You want to respect your teen enough to want them to formulate their thoughts, but at the same time you need to set limits on what they should and shouldn’t do.”</blockquote> <p>These limits can include requiring that the parents be home when he visits friends and enforcing a curfew. Dr. Borba says role-playing with your teens about what to say if he doesn’t want to drink or use drugs can be extremely helpful for teens when they are trying to stand up to peer pressure. And offer an “out” for your child – a code word or text that means “I need an excuse to leave” or “you need to pick me up.” It could be a text of just “11111” or a quick call of “I think I got food poisoning.” This allows your child to remove themselves from a situation by contacting you without needing to explain to peers what is happening.</p> <blockquote>“You need to know that peer pressure will trump values at home,” says Borba. “Give the teen a comeback line, even if they have to lie and say they’re taking cold medicine or something.”</blockquote> <p>And don’t forget the power of speaking with your child’s friends’ parents and guardians.</p> <blockquote>“The best defense is a good offense,” Borba says. “Team up with your kids’ friends’ parents. Ideally, you all come up with the same rules.”</blockquote> <p>If you all share similar values about your children’s use or abstinence of alcohol and drugs, you can work together to monitor each other’s kids and even enforce the same rules across the board so your child can’t say “everyone else’s parents let them do it.”</p> <blockquote>“For us, normally my husband will tell my son that he can blame it on him,” says parent advisor and mother of two Mercedes Sandoval. “My husband doesn’t care if his friends think he’s mean.”</blockquote> <p>While there may be a temptation to be the “cool” parent, at the end of the day you’re still the parent, reminds Borba. Not only do your choices and strictness or lenience affect your child, but it can also affect you. Borba recommends monitoring what happens in your home, meaning no closed doors, and if you suspect a child’s been drinking, take their car keys. They may ultimately be your responsibility whether or not they’re your child.</p> <p>When it comes to talking with your child, one of the best approaches is to frame the conversation in a way that focuses on you and the family, and not just overtly preventing your child from using alcohol or drugs. </p> <blockquote>“These talks should be brief and to the point,” says Wallace. “Parents should use ‘I’ statements instead of ‘you’ statements. Instead of ‘you seem like you’re going out with your friend a lot,’ say ‘I notice that there are a lot of nights that you are out late with your friends.’”</blockquote> <p>Wallace explains that “you” statements can seem accusatory whereas “I” statements are about coming from a place of concern. Kids will often respect the conversation more if it is born out of your care and concern, rather than feeling like a lecture.</p> <p>At the end of the day, the most important thing is to continue to talk with your child. Keep the lines of communication open and sometimes just listen when your child needs someone to confide in. And if they don’t confide in you, try to make sure there’s an older sibling, family member, or trusted friend that they can go to. Having a support system will help your child navigate the difficult adolescent years and will help to keep them out of trouble.</p> <blockquote>“The number one issue for parents is to make sure their relationship is the absolutely most important thing they do preserve,” explains Dr. Elias. “The relationship with the child is still the most critical issue that in the long run will keep your child on the right path.”</blockquote> <p class="Body"><em>This is the last post in our week-long series — Tough Talks— where we’ve surveyed a handful of our Parent Toolkit experts to see what they recommend for parents to make tough conversations go more smoothly. </em></p> <p><em>If you or someone you know would like more information about the issue, please visit</em><em> <a href="http://www.drugfree.org/">http://www.drugfree.org/</a>.</em></p>
BODYES <p>Hablar con tus hijos sobre el consumo de drogas y alcohol es una decisión muy importante, especialmente cuando tienes que elegir el momento y cómo hacerlo. Y si consideramos todos los temas difíciles que los padres tienen que charlar con sus hijos, esta charla probablemente no sea la más urgente en el orden del día. Pero la relación que desarrolle tu hijo con el alcohol y las drogas tendrá importantes consecuencias para el resto de su vida. Para continuar con nuestra serie de charlas sobre temas difíciles, recurrimos al asesoramiento de nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit.</p> <blockquote>“En promedio, muchos niños comienzan a tener contacto con el alcohol a partir de los 13 años, algunos a los 12 y nuevas estadísticas y evidencias demuestran que podría ser mucho antes”, cuenta Stephen Wallace, director del Centro de investigación y educación para adolescentes. “Es importante que los padres hablen sobre estos temas en las diferentes etapas críticas de la vida de los hijos, especialmente en las edades donde normalmente comienzan a ocurrir estas conductas”.</blockquote> <p>Conoce más formas en las que puedes contribuir al bienestar social y emocional de tus hijos.</p> <p>Según los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades, el 19% de los estudiantes de escuela secundaria admitieron haber tomado más que algunos sorbos de alcohol antes de cumplir los 13 años. Y al preguntarles si habían tomado al menos una vez un trago de una bebida alcohólica en su vida, la cifra se eleva al 66%. Nuestros expertos son unánimes en su recomendación: debes hablar con tus hijos sobre el alcohol lo antes que puedas. Algunos incluso recomiendan hacerlo durante los últimos años de la escuela primaria.</p> <blockquote>“No existe ninguna garantía de que tu hijo no beberá”, aclara la Dra. Michele Borba, experta en crianza. “Pero puedes criar a tus hijos para que tengan menos chance de ser bebedores empedernidos ni abusen del consumo de alcohol a edades cada vez más tempranas. Y ese es el secreto: hay que hacerse cargo de la crianza de los hijos”.</blockquote> <p>Parte de esta premisa es identificar los valores familiares y asegurarse de que, como modelo a seguir, tú te apegues a esos valores, explica Borba. Los niños aprenden de ti, desde pequeños, ya sea que tomes un trago después de un día difícil en el trabajo o que compres bebidas y llenes el refrigerador cuando esperas visitas. Además de enseñarle conductas responsables, también debes comunicar tus valores a tus hijos. Solo porque los menciones una vez, aclara Borba, no significa que se hayan grabado a fuego. Tiene que ser un tema de conversación permanente.</p> <blockquote>“Durante mis investigaciones descubrí que muchos niños nunca hablaron con sus padres sobre estos temas”, explica Wallace. “Las investigaciones demuestran que los padres que comunican sus expectativas tienen hijos más propensos a cumplir con esas expectativas”.</blockquote> <p>Intenta incluir estas conversaciones en tus interacciones cotidianas para que sean más naturales. Wallace sugiere que un paseo en auto es la ocasión ideal para iniciar una conversación de este tipo ya que tienes una audiencia que no puede escapar. Antes de ir a dormir también puede ser un buen momento... de hecho, cualquier ocasión en la que tengan más de 5 minutos para charlar. Como un disparador de la charla puedes recurrir a las letras de canciones u otras cosas que les interesen a tus hijos</p> <blockquote>“Los niños necesitan comprender que es algo que hacen los adultos. Si es algo que quieres hacer cuando seas adulto, puedes hacerlo”, explica Maurice Elias, Director del laboratorio de aprendizaje socio-emocional Rutgers.</blockquote> <p>Aunque señala que la conversación podría ser un poco diferente si vives en un estado en el que recientemente se haya legalizado la marihuana, como por ejemplo en Colorado. Muchas veces los jóvenes no ven los riesgos asociados con las drogas que se han legalizado recientemente. Y según CDC, en todo el país, el 41% de los estudiantes secundarios han probado la marihuana al menos una vez. Pero en Colorado y en los demás estados, debes ser mayor de determinada edad para consumir.</p> <blockquote>“Es una conversación diferente. Los jóvenes deben comprender que hay un límite legal de edad para poder hacerlo, y hay que respetar la ley”, aclara. “Si la ley cambia, entonces el límite de edad cambiará”.</blockquote> <p>Pero, sobre todo, la conversación debe continuar a medida que tu hijo crezca y comience a experimentar. El Dr. Elias explica que los padres deberían intentar adquirir un cierto nivel de comprensión, haciendo uso de su propia experiencia si fuera necesario. A veces, el recordar cómo eran las cosas cuando tú eras niño puede tener un gran efecto en tu habilidad para relacionarte con tu hijo. Es probable que si tú no experimentaste con drogas, seguramente tuviste amigos que lo hicieron. Nuestros expertos están de acuerdo en que plantear el tema desde la perspectiva del “solo di no” no es realista.</p> <blockquote>“Si cierras la puerta, y solo le dices que no, corres el riesgo de que ellos digan sí”, explica Jennifer Miller, consultora en educación. “Crear juntos las reglas es la mejor política. Respeta a tus hijos adolescentes lo suficiente para que se sientan cómodos y expresen sus ideas, pero al mismo tiempo pon límites a lo que deben y no deberían hacer”.</blockquote> <p>Estos límites pueden ser exigir que los padres estén en casa cuando vayan de visita a casa de amigos y que cumplan con el horario de regreso. La Dra. Borba aconseja ensayar juegos de rol con tus hijos para practicar qué deben decir si no quieren beber alcohol o consumir drogas. Esto puede ser extremadamente útil para los adolescentes cuando deben enfrentarse a la presión de sus pares, y también dales una “salida”: una palabra o mensaje en clave que signifique “necesito una excusa para irme” o “ven a buscarme”. Puede ser un mensaje de texto “11111” o una llamada rápida avisando que “creo que me cayó mal la comida”. Esto le permitirá a tu hijo alejarse de una situación incómoda recurriendo a tu ayuda y sin tener que explicar a sus amigos lo que ocurre.</p> <blockquote>“Debes saber que la presión de los pares echará por tierra los valores que les enseñes en tu casa”, dice Borba. “Ofrécele a tu hijo una respuesta ingeniosa, aún si tiene que mentir y decir que tiene que tomar un remedio o algo así”.</blockquote> <p>Y no olvides lo importante que es hablar con los padres o tutores de los amigos de tus hijos.</p> <blockquote>“La mejor defensa es una buena ofensiva”, explica Borba. “Debes aliarte con los padres de los amigos de tus hijos. Lo ideal es que todos sigan las mismas reglas”.</blockquote> <p>Si comparten los mismos valores con respecto al consumo o abstinencia de alcohol y drogas, pueden colaborar entre todos para vigilar a sus hijos y hasta hacer que cumplan con las mismas reglas, entonces tus hijos no pondrán como excusa que “los otros padres los dejan hacerlo”.</p> <blockquote>“En mi caso, mi marido le dice a mi hijo que puede echarle la culpa a él”, cuenta Mercedes Sandoval, asesora y madre de dos. “A mi marido no le importa si sus amigos piensan que es malo”.</blockquote> <p>Si bien existe la tentación de querer ser un papá cool, Borba nos recuerda que, al fin y al cabo, seguimos siendo los padres. Nuestras elecciones y nuestra severidad o indulgencia no solo afectan a nuestros hijos, también nos puede afectar a nosotros. Borba recomienda controlar lo que ocurra en tu casa, nada de andar con las puertas cerradas. Y si sospechas que alguno de los chicos estuvo bebiendo, quítale las llaves del auto. También son tu responsabilidad, no importa si es tu propio hijo o no.</p> <p>Cuando se trata de hablar con un hijo, una de las mejores formas es encarar la conversación de manera que se centre en ti y en la familia, no solo en evitar abiertamente que tu hijo consuma drogas o alcohol.</p> <blockquote>“Deben ser conversaciones breves y concisas”, aclara Wallace. “Los padres deberían usar la primera persona; por ejemplo, en vez de decir “estás saliendo mucho con tu amigo”, puedes decir “noté que van varias noches que sales hasta tarde con tus amigos”.</blockquote> <p>Wallace explica que el usar la segunda persona en tus charlas puede sonar como que estás haciendo una acusación. En cambio, si usas la primera persona, todo lo que digas se originará desde un lugar de genuina preocupación. Los niños respetan mucho más una conversación si perciben que nace desde tu preocupación e interés por su bienestar, que si perciben que los estás aleccionando.</p> <p>Porque, a final de cuentas, lo más importante es que puedas continuar hablando con tu hijo. Mantén las líneas de comunicación abiertas. Cuando tu hijo necesite confiar en ti para contarte algo, solo escúchalo. Si no se siente cómodo contándotelo a ti, asegúrate de que pueda recurrir a un hermano mayor, a un miembro de la familia o a un amigo de confianza. Contar con una red de apoyo le ayudará a tus hijos a navegar las difíciles aguas de la adolescencia y mantenerse alejados de los problemas.</p> <blockquote>“La cuestión primordial para los padres es asegurarse de que su relación con los hijos sea lo más importante para proteger”, explica el Dr. Elias. “La relación con los hijos es fundamental para que, a la larga, tu hijos se mantengan en el sendero correcto”.</blockquote> <p><em>Esta es la última publicación de nuestra serie semanal, Charlas difíciles, donde consultamos a nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones para que los padres puedan hablar en forma más cómoda sobre estos temas espinosos.</em></p> <p><em>Si tú o alguien que conoces desea obtener más información sobre este tema, pueden visitar <a href="http://www.drugfree.org/">http://www.drugfree.org/</a>.</em></p>
CATHTML F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4675857-5056-9A4B-6CDDB56B04581B11,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5
CMLABEL Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol
CREATEDBY coreysnyder_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED [empty string]
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:43:58.297
DESCRIPTION How your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have serious consequences. We talked to a panel of our Parent Toolkit experts for their advice.
DESCRIPTIONES Hablar con tus hijos sobre el consumo de drogas y alcohol es una decisión muy importante, especialmente cuando tienes que elegir el momento y cómo hacerlo.
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about talking to your kids about drugs and alcohol:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT A panel of Parent Toolkit experts offers advice on starting this tough but important conversation.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol
LASTUPDATEDBY coreysnyder_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 0D969620-5AC4-11E4-A1220050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-10-24 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs & Alcohol
SEOTITLEES Cómo hablar sobre las drogas y el alcohol
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER How your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have a life-long effect and serious consequences.
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE How Do You Talk to Your Kids About Drugs & Alcohol?
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Deciding when and how to talk to kids about alcohol and drug use can be a big decision. With all the other difficult conversations parents have with kids, this one might not be the most pressing on the agenda. But how your child approaches alcohol and drugs can have a life-long effect and serious consequences. To continue our series on these tough talks, we talked to a panel of our Parent Toolkit experts for their advice.
TEASERES Hablar con tus hijos sobre el consumo de drogas y alcohol es una decisión muy importante, especialmente cuando tienes que elegir el momento y cómo hacerlo.
TEASERIMAGE F99933D0-1FDD-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE Tough Talks: How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs and Alcohol
TITLEES Charlas difíciles: cómo hablar con tus hijos sobre las drogas y el alcohol
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Check out expert advice on how to have this tough but important conversation about drugs & alcohol @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Teenage Girl With Phone

Your Child's Online Behavior Is a Reflection of Offline Parenting

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1LJzkOG
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Raising children in a digital society can be challenging. Today kids are exposed to technology and are sometimes given their very own keypads in their first years of life.</p> <p>Generations earlier, the big talk was about the birds and the bees. Maybe parents would discuss this with us only a few times. A handful at the most -- sometimes not even that much in our adolescent years. Sex was (and is) a topic that many parents want to talk about as briefly as possible and then walk away.</p> <p>When it comes to the digital world, there is no walking away. The reality for today’s youth is that their online reputation will someday determine their college admission and very possibly their future employer. Every keystroke, post, and comment counts.</p> <p>Your child's online social skills are as critical as their offline people skills.</p> <h4>Where do you begin?</h4> <p>In tech terms -- by <em>chatting</em>. The tech talk is not a conversation you have once or twice, it's an ongoing discussion since the web is changing (as are your children) on a daily basis.</p> <p>Unlike the sex talk, talking to your child about their cyber-life has to be done on a <em>regular</em> basis. It should be as common as, "How was your day at school?"</p> <div style="position: relative; padding-bottom: calc(56.25% + 50px); height: 0;"><iframe style="position: absolute; width: 100%; height: 100%;" src="http://www.today.com/offsite/my-kid-would-never-cyberbully-or-would-they-471111747965" width="300" height="150" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <h4>Short chats are better than no chats.</h4> <p>Whether you are riding in the car or sharing a meal, be sure you take ten minutes or more to talk about their digital lives.</p> <p>The Internet is evolving every day, not only for our children but for adults too, so this can be a two-way conversation. Encourage them to show you new apps or websites they’ve discovered, and <em>you </em>can show them what you have learned as well.  Are you frustrated with your computer, tablet, or mobile device? Who better to teach you easier ways to work with new technology than your teenager?</p> <p>Keep in mind, cyberspace is the 21st Century playground for our youth and teens. Not everyone they meet on this playground has good intentions. Just as you would discuss their offline friends and social activities, chat with them about the friends they mingle with online and the websites they visit. Building that relationship of communication and trust at home will empower them in the cyber-world. Again, it’s why your offline parenting skills are critical to helping your child make better digital choices.</p> <h4>Think CHAT:</h4> <p><strong>C </strong>- Communication is key. Offline parenting will help online safety. Never stop talking about your child's daily cyber life. It is just as important as how their day was at school.</p> <p><strong>H </strong>- Help is always a call/text away. Be sure your child knows you are available to them. Note that the number one reason children don't report cyberbullying to their parents is fear of losing their lifeline to their friends -- the Internet. They should never have to fear your judgment, especially if they fall victim to online harassment. Make sure they know their safety is always your priority and that you are on their side.</p> <p><strong>A</strong> - Action plans. Talk to your child about action plans for cyberbullying. You are your child's advocate and you will be there to help them implement steps to prevent online cruelty. Starting with the child knowing to tell a parent or adult, and continuing with learning how to block and report.</p> <p><strong>T </strong>- Treat others as you want to be treated. It is the most important rule in real life and on the Internet. Always treat people with <strong><em>kindness</em></strong>. Make it a top priority.</p> <p>With short chats, you can learn how to better protect your children from cyberbullying in a way that works for them and for you. Through daily check-ins, you can empower them to make better digital decisions when you aren't around. Teach them the phrase “when in doubt, click out,” so they know what to do when they feel uncomfortable in a chatroom, on a website, or using an app.</p> <p>It is imperative to understand that in today's society the online world is as important to our children’s lives as their daily offline world. We must also treat it that way. Talking to them on a daily basis about their virtual lives, even if it is only for a few minutes, is just as important as getting their homework done on time.  You don't have to be a tech-geek or social media super-star, just be a caring parent.</p>
BODYES <p>Criar hijos en una sociedad digital es todo un desafío. Hoy en día los niños están expuestos a la tecnología y, muchas veces, reciben sus propios dispositivos en sus primeros años de vida.</p> <p>Con las generaciones anteriores, la gran discusión era cómo se hablaba a los niños sobre la cigüeña, las semillitas y los repollos. Tal vez algunos padres hablaran sobre este tema un par de veces. Y algunos otros, con suerte, traían el tema a colación durante nuestra adolescencia. El sexo fue (y es) un tema sobre el cual los padres desean hablar lo menos posible y, después, desentenderse de todo.</p> <p>Pero cuando se trata de la era digital, no hay forma de escaparse. La realidad para los jóvenes de hoy es que, algún día, su reputación en línea será determinante para ingresar a una universidad y, muy probablemente, para un futuro trabajo. Cada pulsación de una tecla, cada publicación y cada comentario cuentan.</p> <p>Las habilidades sociales en línea de tus hijos son tan importantes como las habilidades sociales en el mundo real.</p> <p><strong>Pero, ¿por dónde comenzar?</strong></p> <p>Para usar un término tecnológico: chateando. Hablar sobre la tecnología no es una conversación casual de un par de veces. Es una discusión permanente porque la web cambia todos los días, al igual que tus hijos.</p> <p>A diferencia de la charla sobre sexo, hablar con tus hijos sobre la vida cibernética es algo que debes hacer en forma habitual. Debería ser tan común como cuando les preguntas “¿cómo te fue hoy en la escuela?”</p> <p><strong>Es preferible una charla corta a ninguna charla.</strong></p> <p>No importa si están en el auto o comiendo, asegúrate de reservar al menos diez minutos para charlar sobre sus vidas digitales.</p> <p>La Internet evoluciona día a día, no solo para los niños sino también para los adultos, así que esta es una convesarción en la que todos están en tema. Anímalos para que te muestren las aplicaciones o sitios web nuevos que hayan descubierto, y tú también puedes mostrarles lo que has aprendido. ¿Usar tu computadora, tablet o dispositivo móvil es frustrante? ¿Quién mejor que tus hijos adolescentes para mostrarte formas más fáciles de lidiar con las nuevas tecnologías?</p> <p>Ten en cuenta que el ciberespacio es el patio de juegos para los niños y adolescentes del siglo 21. Y no todas las personas que conocen en este patio de juegos tienen buenas intenciones. Así como hablarían sobre sus amigos y actividades sociales en la vida real, habla con ellos sobre los amigos con los que alternan en línea y los sitios web que visitan. Forjar una relación de confianza y buena comunicación en casa los fortalecerá y les dará las herramientas necesarias para el cibermundo. Una vez más, tus habilidades como padre son fundamentales para ayudar a tus hijos a tomar buenas decisiones digitales.</p> <p><strong>Piensa en un CHAT:</strong></p> <p><strong>C:</strong> comunicación, esa es la clave. La educación que les des en tu casa ayudará a que estén más seguros en el mundo digital. No dejes de hablar a diario con tus hijos sobre sus actividades en la red. Es tan importante como preguntarles cómo les fue en la escuela.</p> <p><strong>H:</strong> hacer, accionar. Prepara un plan de acción y habla con tus hijos sobre el ciberacoso. Eres el defensor de tus hijos y siempre estarás ahí para ayudarlos a tomar medidas para evitar y defenderse de los ataques en línea. Es primordial que los niños sepan que deben recurrir a sus padres o a un adulto, y luego que aprendan a bloquear y reportar esos ataques.</p> <p><strong>A:</strong> ayuda. Con solo llamar o enviar un mensaje de texto recibirán ayuda. Asegúrate de que tus hijos sepan que siempre pueden recurrir a ti. Ten en cuenta que el principal motivo por el que los niños no cuentan a sus padres que son víctimas de ciberacoso es porque tienen miedo de perder su conexión con sus amigos: la Internet. Nunca deberían temer que sus padres los juzguen, especialmente si son víctimas de acoso en línea. Asegúrate de que sepan que su seguridad siempre será tu prioridad y que estás de su lado.</p> <p><strong>T:</strong> trata a los demás como quieres que te traten a ti. Es la regla más importante a seguir, tanto para la vida cotidiana como en Internet. Siempre debes ser <em><strong>amable</strong></em> con las personas; debe ser una prioridad.</p> <p>En unas pocas charlas breves puedes aprender cómo proteger a tus hijos del ciberacoso en una forma que sea útil tanto para ellos como para ti. Con breves conversaciones diarias, les darás las herramientas que les permitirán tomar mejores decisiones en el mundo digital si tú no estás cerca. Enséñales que “si tienen dudas, hagan clic y salgan”, para que sepan qué hacer si no se sienten cómodos en un salón de chat, en un sitio web o al usar una aplicación.</p> <p>Es fundamental comprender que, en la sociedad actual, el mundo en línea es tan importante para la vida de nuestros hijos como su mundo real. Y debemos tratar el tema con la misma importancia. Hablar con tus hijos en forma cotidiana sobre sus vidas virtuales, aunque sea por algunos minutos, es tan importante como mandarlos a hacer la tarea. No es necesario ser un mago de la tecnología o una superstrella de las redes sociales, simplemente debes ser un padre que se preocupa por sus hijos.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,03D8C832-5056-9A4B-6C28465592F5DE32,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:29:09.107
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:28:56.473
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Your Child's Online Behavior Is a Reflection of Offline Parenting
LASTUPDATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 90E2D430-6D1A-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D8C832-5056-9A4B-6C28465592F5DE32
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-10-12 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Raising children in a digital society can be challenging. When it comes to the digital world, there is no walking away. The reality for today’s youth is that their online reputation will someday determine their college admission and very possibly their future employer. Every keystroke, post, and comment counts.
TEASERES Hoy en día los niños están expuestos a la tecnología y, muchas veces, reciben sus propios dispositivos en sus primeros años de vida.
TEASERIMAGE 90761030-1AEC-11E7-8B500050569A4B6C
TITLE Your Child's Online Behavior Is a Reflection of Offline Parenting
TITLEES La conducta en línea de tus hijos es el reflejo de tu crianza
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 9F1B6C60-6D1A-11E5-B4220050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Sodium

What’s the Deal with Sodium?

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/191lrsT
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1xxCPf7
BODY <p>Why is too much sodium in a child’s diet a problem? This video explains and tells you where the most sodium in a child’s diet is found. The answer might surprise you. </p>
BODYES <p>&iquest;Por qu&eacute; es importante reducir la cantidad de sodio en la dieta de sus hijos? Este video explica esto y &nbsp;tambi&eacute;n incluye informaci&oacute;n sobre en donde se encuentra la mayor cantidad de sodio en la dieta de un ni&ntilde;o. La respuesta podr&iacute;a sorprenderle.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-03-17 16:53:59.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:13.977
DESCRIPTION Why is too much sodium in a child’s diet a problem? The answer might surprise you.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit about why too much sodium in a child's diet is a problem.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/122468039?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/122468157?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" height="281" width="500" frameBorder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/122468039
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/122468157
FACEBOOKTEXT Too much sodium could negatively affect your child's diet. Learn why:
FACEBOOKTEXTES ¿Por qué es importante reducir la cantidad de sodio en la dieta de sus hijos? Este video explica esto y también incluye información sobre en donde se encuentra la mayor cantidad de sodio en la dieta de un niño. La respuesta podría sorprenderle.
LABEL What’s the Deal with Sodium?
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID BBEB28E0-CCE7-11E4-8E8A0050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2015-03-17 16:53:00.0
SEOTITLE What’s the Deal with Sodium?
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE What’s the Deal with Sodium?
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE What’s the Deal with Sodium?
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Why is too much sodium in a child’s diet a problem? This video from the ParentToolkit.com Healthy Habits video series explains and tells you where the most sodium in a child’s diet is found. The answer might surprise you.
TEASERES ¿Por qué es importante reducir la cantidad de sodio en la dieta de sus hijos? Este video explica esto y también incluye información sobre en donde se encuentra la mayor cantidad de sodio en la dieta de un niño. La respuesta podría sorprenderle.
TEASERIMAGE 90D1C2F0-18B6-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE What’s the Deal with Sodium?
TITLEES ¿Cuál es el problema con el sodio?
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES ¿Por qué es importante reducir la cantidad de sodio en la dieta de sus hijos? La respuesta podría sorprenderle
TWITTERTWEET Video: Why too much sodium in a child's diet is a problem via @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 8456B1B0-9B06-11E3-A6F30050569A5318
2 3E44A7D0-9B07-11E3-A6F30050569A5318

Financial Literacy

Understanding how to manage finances is an important part of your teen’s growth and ultimate independence. Like any skill, financial literacy can be taught.

Saving & Spending

Use these strategies to teach and motivate your teen to establish responsible saving and spending habits.

Paying for College

Discover information, tips and advice on how you and your teen can take advantage of programs, scholarships and more help to pay for college.

Recommended

Budgeting

Make College Costs Manageable for the Entire Family

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1wSJaFK
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Applying to college can be as daunting for parents as it is 12th graders–only for different reasons. While students focus on finding a place with the programs and activities they like, as parents we worry about whether we can afford college. We don’t want to let our children down, but we also must live within our family’s budget. Frequent news about the high cost of college and millions of graduates burdened with debt add to our anxiety.  </p> <p>Not to worry. There are things we can all do to make college costs manageable. At uAspire, a national organization which helps thousands of students every year find ways to pay for college, we have learned that understanding what colleges really cost and how to apply for financial aid can make a huge difference.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=7A63AEE0-20A6-11E3-8EC10050569A5318#simple2">Find out how your teen's high school counselor can help you prepare for college. </a></p> <p>Here are a few key facts:</p> <p>- College costs vary enormously depending on where your child goes and how much financial aid she receives. While a few institutions cost more than $60,000, the average cost is much lower - $18,400 for an in-state student at a public, four-year college, $10,700 at a public, two-year college, and $40,000 at a private, four-year college.</p> <p>- Lots of financial aid is available for students who need help with college costs. Last year, students received a total of $238 billion in aid from the federal and state governments, colleges and universities, and other sources.</p> <p>- Most students actually pay less than the published cost of college. How much less depends on their family’s income and the amount of aid they receive.</p> <p>- Borrowing to pay for college is a good investment as long as your child takes advantage of lower-interest student loans offered by federal and state governments and limits the total amount borrowed. College graduates earn much more than people with only a high school diploma, have better health and more time to spend with their children, and participate more actively in their communities.</p> <p>The most important thing you can do now is to apply for financial aid. Here are the steps you need to take:</p> <p>1. Check the web sites of the colleges to which your child is applying to learn how to apply for financial aid. Look under “Future Students,” “Admissions,” or “Tuition and Fees” for information about what forms you need to complete and the “Priority” deadline for filing these forms. All colleges require students to complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Some private colleges also require the CSS (College Scholarship Service) Profile.</p> <p>2. Plan to file your income tax returns as early in January as possible because the FAFSA and Profile ask for information from these returns.</p> <p>3. Complete the FAFSA online at <a href="http://www.fafsa.gov">www.fafsa.gov</a> and Profile at css.collegeboard.org. List the colleges to which your child is applying in alphabetical order so that college staff won’t know which is your first-choice school. If you need assistance completing the forms, call 1-800-433-3243 for FAFSA help and 305-829-9793 for Profile help. There is no need to pay someone to help you.</p> <p>4. Submit your completed forms before the Priority deadlines. Students who apply after this deadline often receive less financial aid than they would have if they applied before.</p> <p>It’s important that your child applies to one college that is a good financial “fit” with your family income as well as a good match with his academic and social interests. It needs to be a place where he can afford to make up the difference between the money you and he can contribute and what it will cost for him to go. A good financial fit can also be a college where he is a top applicant academically, making him likely to receive a merit scholarship. Keep in mind a recent Gallup poll that found employers care more about a person’s knowledge and job skills than where he graduated from college. </p> <p>It’s good to talk with your child now about how much you can afford to pay toward college expenses each year. This information will help you determine which colleges are affordable options after subtracting the financial aid your child receives. It’s easier to have this conversation now than later.</p> <p>Now also is the time to research and apply for scholarships from private organizations. You can search for scholarships at <a href="http://www.FinAid.org">www.FinAid.org</a>. School guidance offices and public libraries also have information about private scholarships.</p> <p>Taking these steps will go a long way toward making college costs manageable for you and your child. Good luck!</p> <p><em>Bob Giannino is the Chief Executive Officer of </em><a href="https://www.uaspire.org/"><em>uAspire</em></a><em>, a national leader in providing college affordability services to young people and families. uAspire partners with high schools, community organizations, and colleges to provide advice to more than 10,000 young people and their families every year.</em></p>
BODYES <p><span lang="ES">Por diversas razones, postularse para ser admitido en una universidad es tan abrumador para los padres como para los alumnos de 12.º grado. Mientras los estudiantes se dedican a buscar un lugar con los programas y actividades que les gusten, los padres nos preocupamos por la financiación de la educación universitaria.  No queremos decepcionar a nuestros hijos, pero también debemos ceñirnos al presupuesto familiar. Las noticias que nos llegan sobre los altos costos de la universidad y los millones de graduados que acarrean el peso de una deuda se suman a nuestra ansiedad.  </span></p> <p><span lang="ES">Pero no hay que preocuparse. Existen diversas medidas que podemos tomar para que los costos sean más manejables. En uAspire, una organización nacional que ayuda a miles de estudiantes cada año a encontrar formas de pagar sus estudios universitarios, hemos descubierto que conocer el costo real de la universidad y cómo solicitar ayuda financiera puede ser una gran diferencia.</span></p> <p><span lang="ES"><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=7A63AEE0-20A6-11E3-8EC10050569A5318#simple2">Conoce cómo el consejero escolar de tu hijo puede ayudarte a prepararte para la universidad.</a></span></p> <p><span lang="ES">Estos son algunos datos clave:</span></p> <ul> <li>Los costos universitarios varían enormemente dependiendo de la institución a la que asista tu hijo y el nivel de asistencia financiera que reciba. Si bien algunas universidades cuestan más de US$ 60,000, el costo promedio es mucho menor: US$ 18,400 por estudiante en una universidad pública estatal para una carrera de cuatro años; US$ 10,700 por estudiante en una universidad pública para una carrera de dos años, y US$ 40,000 en una universidad privada para una carrera de cuatro años.</li> <li>Existe una gran variedad de opciones de ayuda financiera para los estudiantes que la necesitan. El año pasado, se otorgaron US$ 238 mil millones en asistencia del gobierno federal, gobiernos estatales, universidades e instituciones académicas de enseñanza superior, y otras fuentes.</li> <li>La mayoría de los estudiantes en realidad paga menos que el costo publicado. Cuánto menos dependerá de los ingresos familiares y de la cantidad de ayuda que reciban.</li> <li>Tomar un préstamo para pagar la universidad es una buena inversión siempre y cuando tu hijo pueda acceder a los préstamos para estudiantes con baja tasa de interés ofrecidos por el gobierno federal o estatal y limite el monto total solicitado. Los graduados universitarios ganan mejores salarios que las personas que solo cuentan con el título de la escuela secundaria, tienen mejor salud y más tiempo para pasar con sus hijos, y participan en forma más activa en sus comunidades.</li> </ul> <p>Lo más importante que puedes hacer ahora es solicitar ayuda financiera. Estos son los pasos que deberás tomar:</p> <ol> <li>Consulta los sitios web de las universidades a las que se postula tu hijo para buscar información sobre ayuda financiera. Busca en las secciones “Futuros estudiantes”, “Ingreso” o “Matrícula y cargos” la información necesaria sobre los formularios que debes completar y la fecha límite “prioritaria” para presentarlos. Todas las universidades exigen que los estudiantes completen el formulario Free Application for Federal Student Aid, (FAFSA, Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes). Algunas universidades privadas también exigen el perfil College Scholarship Service (CSS, Servicio de Becas Universitarias).</li> <li>Planifica presentar tus declaraciones de impuestos lo antes posible, de preferencia en enero, ya que en los formularios FAFSA y CSS debes incluir información que figura en ellas.</li> <li>Completa el formulario FAFSA en línea en<span class="apple-converted-space"> </span><a href="http://www.fafsa.gov/">www.fafsa.gov</a><span class="apple-converted-space"> </span>y el perfil CSS en css.collegeboard.org. Indica en orden alfabético las universidades a las que se postula tu hijo, para que el personal de la universidad no sepa cuál es tu primera opción. Si necesitas ayuda para completar los formularios, puedes llamar al 1-800-433-3243 (FAFSA) y al  305-829-9793 (CSS). No es necesario pagar a nadie para que te ayude.</li> <li>Envía los formularios completos antes de la fecha límite prioritaria. Los estudiantes que presentan su solicitud pasada esta fecha límite habitualmente reciben menos ayuda financiera que si hubieran hecho la presentación a tiempo.</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p>Es importante que tu hijo se postule a una universidad que esté en sintonía con tus ingresos familiares y que también se ajuste a sus intereses académicos y sociales. Debe ser un lugar donde él pueda cubrir la diferencia entre el dinero que tú y él pueden aportar y lo que costará. Una universidad que se ajuste a tus posibilidades financieras también puede ser aquella en la que tu hijo sea uno de los postulantes de mayor nivel académico, y por eso pueda llegar a recibir una beca al mérito. Una encuesta reciente realizada por Gallup muestra que a los empleadores les importan más los conocimientos y habilidades laborales de una persona que la universidad de la que se graduaron. </p> <p>Es importante que hables con tu hijo sobre cuánto dinero dispones para cubrir los gastos universitarios cada año. Esta información te permitirá seleccionar las universidades que sean una opción asequible después de deducir el monto de ayuda financiera que recibirá tu hijo. Es preferible tener esta conversación ahora y no cuando ya sea tarde.</p> <p>Ahora es el momento también para informarse y postularse para recibir becas de organizaciones privadas. Puedes buscar las becas disponibles en <a href="http://www.finaid.org/">www.FinAid.org</a>. Las oficinas de orientación de las escuelas y las bibliotecas públicas también ofrecen información sobre becas privadas.</p> <p>Seguir estos pasos te será de gran ayuda para que los costos sean mucho más manejables, tanto para ti como para tu hijo. ¡Buena suerte!</p> <p><em>Bob Giannino es el Director ejecutivo de</em><em> </em><a href="https://www.uaspire.org/"><em>uAspire</em></a><em>, líder nacional en servicios de financiación para jóvenes y familias. uAspire se asocia con escuelas secundarias, organizaciones comunitarias y universidades para ofrecer asesoramiento a más de 10,000 jóvenes y sus familias cada año.</em></p> <p> </p>
CATHTML 30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7B4A16-5056-9A4B-6CB315AFE94D0D7D,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:27:58.393
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:00:47.053
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Make College Costs Manageable for the Entire Family
LASTUPDATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 89385520-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68
PTOPIC F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA
PUBLISHDATE 2014-12-08 11:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Applying to college can be as daunting for parents as it is for 12th graders–only for different reasons. While students focus on finding a place with the programs and activities they like, as parents we worry about whether we can afford college. We don’t want to let our children down, but we also must live within our family’s budget. Not to worry. There are things we can all do to make college costs manageable.
TEASERES Por diversas razones, postularse para ser admitido en una universidad es tan abrumador para los padres como para los alumnos de 12.º grado.
TEASERIMAGE E70627B0-1FC8-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE Make College Costs Manageable for the Entire Family
TITLEES Costos universitarios más manejables para toda la familia
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 909D5680-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

university campus

Making an Affordable College Choice

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1Ea5XPc
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Late winter and early spring are both exciting and stressful times in the college planning process. For many parents, excitement about acceptance letters is tempered by concerns about whether they can afford their child’s first-choice college. While scholarships are great resources that can help your teen pay for his education, they may not cover all of the costs involved, and financial aid can be a good option to help you offset some of these expenditures. If you haven’t already applied for financial aid, it’s important that you take action as soon as possible because it may provide you with the funding that you need to afford your child’s college education. UAspire is committed to helping parents find an affordable path to a postsecondary education for their children, and we have a great number of <a href="https://www.uaspire.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/FAFSA-Checklist.Flowchart.Final-Template-2012-2013-school-year.pdf">resources</a> to help you navigate the financial aid process.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=89385520-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318">Find out more about applying for financial aid and managing college costs.</a></p> <p>If you have already submitted your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), a deeper understanding of the financial aid awards your child receives and what you will be responsible for paying is a key step in deciding which college he should attend. Essentially there are two ways families pay for college – with gift aid that does not have to be repaid, or through self-financing, which means funds provided by your family from savings, current income, loans and other sources. </p> <p>Financial aid awards typically consist of three types of aid:</p> <p><strong>- Gift aid</strong> includes grants from the federal and state governments and college funds awarded based on the student’s demonstrated financial need. Scholarships come from colleges and are awarded based on merit such as outstanding academic achievement.</p> <p><strong>- Loans</strong> come from various sources. Most are Federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans. Subsidized loans are for students from lower income families; the federal government pays the interest on these loans while the student is in college. Unsubsidized loans are available to all students and require students to pay the interest while in college. </p> <p><strong>- Federal work-study</strong> is money that students have to earn, usually through a job on campus. The student is responsible for finding the job, and colleges do not guarantee a job for every student who receives an award.</p> <p>Making sense of award letters can be challenging. Colleges do not describe the same types of aid using the same terms. Further complicating matters is that the amount of gift aid, loans and work-study differs from one college to another, making it hard to compare awards and determine what the student will actually have to pay at each college. </p> <p>Determining college costs involves subtracting the gift aid the student receives from the direct cost of attendance, which consists of tuition and fees, room and board. Scholarships students receive from their high school or a private organization should also be subtracted. This calculation provides the “net” cost for a student to attend a particular college and makes it easy to compare the direct costs of different colleges. Going a step further and subtracting the loans awarded to students from the net cost results in an estimate of what families will have to pay for their child’s first year. You will also need to budget for books, supplies, transportation and incidentals. You have more control over these costs than the direct costs charged by colleges. You may want to consider having your child attend a college close to home or live at home to limit incidental expenditures and reduce costs.</p> <p>Most colleges bill students twice a year. Half of the balance is due in the summer before they enroll and the balance before the second semester is billed in January.  If you can’t cover what your child owes from your income or savings, you have several options. Colleges offer payment plans that allow parents to spread college costs over ten months, usually beginning in May after the student has committed to enrolling. The federal government and some states also offer parent loans, the interest rates for which can be much lower than other types of loans. In addition, some private lenders offer parent loans. Generally, private loans have higher costs and less flexible repayment terms than those offered by federal and state agencies. In choosing a particular loan, it is important to compare the differences in interest rates, origination fees, and repayment terms. </p> <p>Making an informed financial decision about college will benefit you and your teen.  If you both take time to understand the various options for paying for college and the long-term implications of each one, you can help your teen make a college choice that works for both of you. In doing so, your teen will feel that the college she attends fits her needs and interests, and is a choice that is affordable for the entire family. You will also be allowing her to focus on her studies instead of having to worry about the stresses of paying for college on her own. At the same time, you can rest assured that whatever accommodations you may need to make for your child’s education are reasonable and not unduly burdensome.  In the long term, a carefully considered decision will reduce financial stress on the family and help prevent the possibility of your child leaving college before completing a degree. It will also allow her to get a good start toward achieving her career and life goals, which is priceless.</p> <p><em>Bob Giannino is the Chief Executive Officer of <a href="https://www.uaspire.org/">uAspire</a>, a national leader in providing college affordability services to young people and families. uAspire partners with high schools, community organizations, and colleges to provide advice to more than 10,000 young people and their families every year.</em></p>
BODYES <p>El final del invierno y el comienzo de la primavera es una época emocionante y muy estresante en el proceso de planificación de los estudios universitarios. Para muchos padres, la emoción de recibir la carta de aceptación se ve nublada por su preocupación sobre si podrán pagar la universidad que sea la primera opción de su hijo. Si bien las becas son un excelente recurso que ayuda a pagar la educación de tu hijo, no siempre cubren todos los costos, y la ayuda financiera puede ser una buena opción para ayudarte a cubrir algunos de estos gastos. Si aún no has solicitado ningún tipo de ayuda financiera, es importante que lo hagas cuanto antes porque podría proporcionarte los fondos que necesitas para pagar los estudios universitarios de tu hijo. El compromiso de UAspire es ayudar a los padres a encontrar un camino asequible para la educación terciaria de sus hijos, y contamos con una gran cantidad de recursos para ayudarlos en el proceso de solicitar ayuda financiera. </p> <p><em>Encuentra más información sobre cómo solicitar ayuda financiera y el manejo de los costos.</em> </p> <p>Si ya has presentado la Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes (FAFSA, Free Application for Federal Student Aid), es fundamental que conozcas en profundidad el tipo de ayuda financiera que recibirá tu hijo y qué gastos serán tu responsabilidad para decidir a qué universidad debe asistir tu hijo. Básicamente, existen dos formas en que las familias pagan los estudios universitarios: mediante una subvención que no debe reembolsarse o mediante financiación propia, es decir, fondos provenientes de los ahorros familiares, ingresos actuales, préstamos u otras fuentes. </p> <p>La asistencia financiera suele dividirse en tres tipos:</p> <ul> <li>Subvenciones no reembolsables otorgadas por el gobierno federal y/o estatal y becas universitarias otorgadas según las necesidades financieras comprobadas del estudiante. Las becas otorgadas por las universidades se entregan según el mérito, como por ejemplo, logros académicos sobresalientes.</li> <li>Préstamos que pueden obtenerse de varias fuentes. La mayoría son Préstamos Federales Directos con y sin subsidio. Los préstamos con subsidio se otorgan a los estudiantes de familias de ingresos más bajos. El gobierno federal paga los intereses del préstamo mientras el estudiante asiste a la universidad. Los préstamos sin subsidio están disponibles para todos los estudiantes y estos deben pagar los intereses mientras asisten a la universidad. </li> <li>El Programa Federal de Estudio y Trabajo ofrece puestos de trabajo a los estudiantes, en general en el campus. El estudiante tiene la responsabilidad de buscar un trabajo y las universidades no garantizan un puesto para cada estudiante que participe en este programa.</li> </ul> <p>Comprender las cartas de otorgamiento de becas puede ser todo un desafío. Las universidades no describen el mismo tipo de ayuda usando la misma terminología. Y para complicar más las cosas, el monto de la subvención, préstamo o beca para trabajo-estudio varía de una universidad a otra. De manera que es muy difícil hacer una comparación y poder dilucidar cuánto deberá pagar el estudiante.</p> <p>Para determinar los costos de la universidad debes restar el monto de ayuda financiera que recibe el estudiante al costo directo de asistencia, que está formado por los gastos de matrícula y cargos, alojamiento y comida. También debes restar cualquier beca que reciba el estudiante de su escuela secundaria o de una organización privada. Este cálculo permite conocer el costo “neto”para que el estudiante asista a una universidad en particular y hace más sencillo comparar los costos directos de diferentes instituciones. Si avanzamos un paso más y restamos al costo neto el monto del préstamo estudiantil otorgado, obtendremos un estimado de lo que la familia deberá pagar por el primer año de universidad de su hijo. También deberás contar con un presupuesto para los libros de texto, transporte y contingencias; aunque tendrás mayor control sobre estos gastos que sobre los costos directos que cobran las universidades. También sería prudente evaluar la posibilidad de que tu hijo asista a una universidad más cerca de casa o que siga viviendo en casa para limitar los gastos imprevistos y reducir los costos. </p> <p>La mayoría de las universidades emiten su factura dos veces por año. La mitad del monto debe saldarse durante el verano anterior a la inscripción. El saldo restante se factura en enero y debe cancelarse antes del inicio del segundo semestre. Si no puedes pagar la deuda con tus ingresos o ahorros, tienes varias opciones. Las universidades ofrecen planes de pago que dividen los costos en diez pagos mensuales que, generalmente, comienzan en mayo luego de que el estudiante se ha comprometido a inscribirse. El gobierno federal y algunos estados también ofrecen préstamos para padres, y las tasas de interés pueden llegar a ser mucho menores que las de otros tipos de préstamos. Algunos prestamistas privados también ofrecen préstamos para padres. Por los general, los préstamos privados tienen costos más altos y condiciones de pago menos flexibles que los préstamos ofrecidos por las agencias federales y estatales. Al elegir un préstamo, es importante comparar las tasas de interés, los gastos de emisión y las condiciones de pago. </p> <p>Tomar una decisión informada en temas financieros será beneficioso para todos. Si dedican tiempo a analizar las diferentes opciones que existen para pagar la universidad y las consecuencias a largo plazo que acarrea cada una podrás ayudar a tu hijo a elegir una universidad que se ajuste a las expectativas de ambos. También le permitirá a tu hijo concentrarse en sus estudios en vez de tener que preocuparse por tener que pagar la universidad solo. Al mismo tiempo, tendrás la seguridad de que sin importar la deuda que debas contraer para garantizar la educación de hijo, será razonable y no excesivamente onerosa. En el largo plazo, una decisión analizada con prudencia reducirá la carga financiera sobre la familia y evitará la posibilidad de que tu hijo tenga que abandonar la universidad antes de graduarse. También le permitirá a tu hijo dar el primer paso para poder alcanzar sus metas profesionales, lo cual es invaluable. </p> <p>Bob Giannino es el Director ejecutivo de uAspire, líder nacional en servicios de financiación para jóvenes y familias. uAspire se asocia con las escuelas secundarias, organizaciones comunitarias y universidades para ofrecer asesoramiento a más de 10.000 jóvenes y sus familias cada año.</p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:13.273
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:04:11.383
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Making an Affordable College Choice
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 27661C90-BEBC-11E4-AF9C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2015-03-02 11:30:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Understanding how financial aid works and what your family will be responsible for paying is key to finding an affordable college choice for your teen.
TEASERES El final del invierno y el comienzo de la primavera es una época emocionante y muy estresante en el proceso de planificación de los estudios universitarios.
TEASERIMAGE 71D9C2E0-2436-11E7-BDE80050569A4B6C
TITLE Making an Affordable College Choice
TITLEES Cómo elegir una universidad asequible
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 909D5680-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Hand Coins

What’s the Best Approach to Giving Kids Allowance?

struct
ABlogPosts
array
1 6D9CDD50-DEF8-11E4-BD580050569A5318
2 A575CF40-DEF6-11E4-BD580050569A5318
3 3CC1D540-DEF4-11E4-BD580050569A5318
4 A8F5C3B0-DEF5-11E4-BD580050569A5318
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1Hk0hEe
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Welcome to Parenting Perspectives, a place where Parent Toolkit experts debate the important parenting and education issues of the day. Join us as we tackle these key issues and help you navigate the nuanced world of parenting. If you have a question for our experts, feel free to submit it using our “<a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=82D4AAD8-29E2-11E3-8F610050569A5318">Contact Us</a>” form or email us at <a href="mailto:ParentToolkit@nbcuni.com">ParentToolkit@nbcuni.com</a>. We would love to hear from you!</p> <p>April is Financial Literacy Month, and to commemorate the occasion, our experts are focusing on the topic of allowance. The question is: <em>What’s the best approach for parents to take when it comes to giving children allowances? </em>Here is what our experts have to say<em>:<br /></em></p>
BODYES <p>Bienvenido a Parenting Perspectives, un lugar donde los expertos de Parent Toolkit debaten sobre temas importantes relacionados con la crianza y la educación. Acompáñanos mientras abordamos estos temas clave y te ayudamos a navegar por este mundo conflictivo que es la crianza. Si tienes una pregunta para nuestros expertos, envíala a través de nuestro formulario “Contáctanos” o por email a ParentToolkit@nbcuni.com. ¡Nos encantaría que te comuniques con nosotros!</p> <p>Abril es el Mes de la Educación Financiera, y para celebrarlo, nuestros expertos se centrarán en el tema de las mesadas. La pregunta es: ¿Cuál es el mejor enfoque que pueden adoptar los padres a la hora de darles dinero a sus hijos? Esto es lo que tienen para decir nuestros expertos:   </p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7EC350-5056-9A4B-6C16E476AF30DBF4
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-18 13:40:12.933
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:24:25.303
DESCRIPTION Experts answer your questions on how to navigate the nuanced world of parenting. Here, we discuss the best approach to giving kids allowance.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like these blog posts from experts discussing the best approach to giving kids allowance.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Experts answer your questions on how to navigate the nuanced world of parenting. Here, we discuss the best approach to giving kids allowance.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL What’s the Best Approach to Giving Kids Allowance?
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 92D0C2F0-DEFB-11E4-BD580050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7EC350-5056-9A4B-6C16E476AF30DBF4
PTOPIC F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA
PUBLISHDATE 2015-04-09 17:01:00.0
SEOTITLE What’s the Best Approach to Giving Kids Allowance?
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER April is Financial Literacy Month, and to commemorate the occasion, our experts are focusing on the topic of allowance. The question is: What’s the best approach for parents to take when it comes to giving children allowances? Here is what our experts have to say.
SHORTTEASERES Bienvenido a Parenting Perspectives, un lugar donde los expertos de Parent Toolkit debaten sobre temas importantes relacionados con la crianza y la educación.
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE What’s the Best Approach to Giving Kids Allowance?
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Parent Toolkit's Parenting Perspectives is a place to debate the important parenting and education issues of the day. April is Financial Literacy Month, and to commemorate the occasion, our experts are focusing on the topic of allowance. The question is: What’s the best approach for parents to take when it comes to giving children allowances? Here is what our experts have to say.”
TEASERES Bienvenido a Parenting Perspectives, un lugar donde los expertos de Parent Toolkit debaten sobre temas importantes relacionados con la crianza y la educación.
TEASERIMAGE CA6F68E0-1970-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
TITLE What’s the Best Approach to Giving Kids Allowance?
TITLEES ¿Cuál es el mejor enfoque respecto de las mesadas?
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET What’s the Best Approach to Giving Kids Allowance? via @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlogSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC0971F-9E78-135D-DE1F1D50844E67E4
2 C60D4D00-249E-11E3-AD580050569A5318
3 42715070-2A8B-11E3-823F0050569A5318
4 EDC09720-C4F7-9B57-ED926CFAC5272578

father son college

Paying for College: What You Need to do Now Before Your Teen Starts College in the Fall

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1Iu7m1W
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Getting ready to send my son to college a few summers ago, I felt excited to see him start a new chapter of his life, but felt sad about the prospect of no longer sharing nightly meals or daily conversations with him. While dealing with such feelings, parents may find it hard to help their child focus on the tasks they need to complete before they leave for campus in the fall. Because many of these tasks involve finances, however, parental support is essential.  Here are some items to talk about with your child before they starts college in the fall.</p> <h4><strong>Paying College Bills</strong></h4> <p>Most colleges no longer mail paper bills. Instead, they send bills to a secure online student portal a month or two before the start of each semester. Information about the student’s financial aid award is also available here. Keep in mind that the bill will be reduced only by the gift aid that the student received, if any. Students will still need to apply for loans through their financial aid office and earn work-study awards once they get to campus.</p> <p>Students can give parents access to their bill by following the directions on the institution’s website under “student accounts” or “paying bills.” Payments are usually due a month before the next semester begins and it’s important to pay on time to avoid hefty late fees. Most parents <strong>pay bills with a check or money order</strong> because colleges charge a 2-3% convenience fee for using a credit card. Some parents also <strong>use low-cost payment plans</strong> to spread college costs over a 10-month period starting as early as May of their child’s senior year of high school. Such plans charge a one-time fee, usually under $100, but no interest.  Most institutions provide a link to available payment plans on their websites under “paying for college.”</p> <p>Most colleges require first-year students living on campus to buy a meal plan. While a few institutions charge a fixed amount for meals, most offer a variety of plans, ranging from 10 to 21 meals per week. Parents need to talk with their child about how many meals they are likely to eat.</p> <h4>Loans</h4> <p>The majority of students and families today borrow to help pay for college. Most financial aid award packages include Federal Direct (also called Stafford) student loans. Federal loans have fixed interest rates that are lower than most private loans, making them a preferable option. Parents who need additional funds can choose from an array of loans offered by the federal government, commercial lenders, state agencies, and some colleges. Because interest rates, repayment terms, and eligibility requirements vary greatly, it is critical to compare different options. The College Board has a <a href="https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/pay-for-college/loans/parent-debt-calculator">parent debt calculator</a> to help families determine how much education debt they can afford.</p> <h4>Student Health Insurance</h4> <p>Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, everyone in the United States is required to have health coverage that qualifies as Minimum Essential Coverage. Students under the age of 26 have several different options, like coverage under a parent’s plan, a private health plan through the Marketplace or a catastrophic health plan. For college students, a lot of universities and colleges around the country offer student health insurance plans as an option for coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Even if you have access to a student health plan through a university, you can still buy a health plan through the Marketplace.</p> <h4>Textbook costs</h4> <p>Textbook expenses vary depending on a student’s major and what courses they end up taking. Students have multiple options for reducing these costs including buying or renting used printed books or using digital books. Because of the high demand for used textbooks, students should buy books as soon as possible after  registering for courses. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Rent-Textbooks/b?ie=UTF8&amp;node=5657188011">Amazon</a> has helpful information about what’s involved with renting books.</p> <h4>On-Campus Jobs</h4> <p>On-campus jobs, including work-study, go fast. Students who want to work on campus should contact their Student Employment Office during the summer and start applying for jobs early. Students should limit their work hours to 15-20 hours a week to have time to keep up with their studies.</p> <p>Parents can take several steps to make this list of tasks easier to manage. First, they can attend parent workshops held in conjunction with their child’s college orientation program. They can also check their child’s college portal frequently for reminders about deadlines, missing documents, valuable campus resources, and upcoming informational events. While it may never make up for the loss of cherished time together during childhood, actively supporting students throughout the summer before college allows parents to ensure the success of one of the most important transitions in their child’s life. </p>
BODYES <p>Hace algunos veranos me estaba preparando para enviar a mi hijo a la universidad. Estaba muy emocionado por verlo iniciar esta nueva etapa en su vida, pero también estaba triste porque ya no compartiríamos nuestras charlas cotidianas o la cena. Al estar lidiando con este torbellino de emociones, los padres no nos damos cuenta que tenemos que ayudar a nuestros hijos a concentrarse en las cosas que deben hacer antes de partir hacia el campus a comienzos del otoño. Como muchas de estas tareas son de índole financiera, el apoyo de los padres es fundamental.  Estos son algunos temas sobre los que debes hablar con tu hijo antes de que comiencen las clases.</p> <h4>Pagar las facturas de la universidad</h4> <p>La mayoría de las universidades ya no envían las factura por correo. En cambio, lo hacen a través de un portal en línea para estudiantes, donde por medio de una conexión segura se envían las facturas uno o dos meses antes del inicio de cada semestre. La información sobre el otorgamiento de ayuda financiera también se encuentra aquí. Ten en cuenta que la factura solo se reducirá si se le ha otorgado ayuda financiera al estudiante. Los estudiantes deben solicitar su préstamo por intermedio de la oficina de ayuda financiera y tratar de obtener becas para trabajo-estudio cuando llegan al campus.</p> <p>Los estudiantes pueden habilitar el acceso a su cuenta para los padres siguiendo las instrucciones que encontrarán en el sitio web de la institución, en las secciones “cuentas de estudiantes” o “pago de facturas”. En general, los pagos vencen un mes antes del inicio del próximo semestre y es importante pagar a tiempo para evitar los cuantiosos cargos por mora. La mayoría de los padres <strong>paga las facturas con un cheque o giro postal</strong> porque las universidades cobran entre un 2% y 3% de recargo por servicio si se paga con tarjeta de crédito. Algunos padres prefieren los<strong> planes de pago de bajo costo</strong>, que dividen los costos en 10 cuotas mensuales que se comienzan a pagar en el mes de mayo mientras se cursa el último año de la escuela secundaria. Este tipo de planes cobra un cargo único de procesamiento, por lo general menor a US$ 100, pero no aplica intereses.  La mayoría de las instituciones incluyen en sus sitios web un enlace a los planes de pagos disponibles. Generalmente en la sección “Pagar la universidad”.</p> <p>La mayoría de las universidades exigen que los estudiantes de primer año que viven en el campus compren un plan de comidas. Si bien algunas instituciones cobran un monto fijo por las comidas, la mayoría ofrece una variedad de planes que incluyen de 10 a 21 comidas por semana. Los padres deben analizar con sus hijos cuántas comidas es probable que tomen.</p> <h4>Préstamos</h4> <p>Actualmente, la mayoría de los estudiantes y de las familias toman préstamos para pagar la universidad. La mayoría de los paquetes de ayuda financiera incluyen los Préstamos Federales Directos, también llamados Préstamos Stafford. Los préstamos federales tienen una tasa de interés fija que es inferior a la ofrecida por la mayoría de los préstamos privados, por lo tanto son la opción más buscada. Los padres que necesitan fondos adicionales pueden elegir entre una variedad de préstamos ofrecidos por el gobierno federal, prestamistas comerciales, agencias estatales y algunas universidades. Debido a las grandes diferencias que existen entre las tasas de interés, condiciones de pago y requisitos, es de vital importancia que comparen las diferentes opciones. El College Board ofrece una <a href="https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/pay-for-college/loans/parent-debt-calculator">calculadora para padres</a> que le permite a las familias hacer una estimación del nivel de endeudamiento que pueden afrontar.</p> <h4>Seguro médico para estudiantes</h4> <p>A partir de la entrada en vigencia de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible, todos los habitantes en los Estados Unidos deben contar con una cobertura médica que se define como Cobertura Esencial Mínima. Los estudiantes menores de 26 años tienen diferentes opciones, como la cobertura dentro del plan de los padres, un plan médico privado del Mercado de Cobertura Médica o un plan de deducible alto (también llamado “plan para catástrofes”). Para los estudiantes de nivel terciario, muchas universidades e instituciones académicas de enseñanza superior ofrecen planes de seguro médico en línea con las directivas de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible. Incluso si tienes acceso a un plan médico para estudiantes con una universidad, puedes adquirir uno en el mercado.</p> <h4>Costo de los libros de texto</h4> <p>Estos gastos varían mucho según la carrera elegida y las materias que se cursen. Los estudiantes cuentan con varias opciones para reducir estos costos, por ejemplo el comprar o alquilar libros usados o usar libros digitales. Debido a la gran demanda de libros de texto usados, se recomienda que los estudiantes compren los libros lo antes posible tras haberse anotado en una clase. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Rent-Textbooks/b?ie=UTF8&amp;node=5657188011">Amazon</a> ofrece información muy útil sobre el proceso de alquiler de libros.</p> <h4>Trabajar en el campus</h4> <p>Los puestos de trabajo en el campus, al igual que las becas para trabajo-estudio, se cubren rápidamente. Los estudiantes que deseen trabajar en el campus deben comunicarse con la Oficina de Empleos para Estudiantes durante el verano y postularse con anticipación. El límite es de 15-20 horas de trabajo semanales para tener tiempo para el estudio. </p> <p>Los padres también pueden tomar algunas medidas para que esta lista de tareas sea mucho más fácil de manejar. En primer lugar, pueden asistir a los talleres para padres que ofrece el programa de orientación de cada universidad. También pueden consultar con frecuencia el portal de la universidad para ver los recordatorios sobre fechas límites, documentación pendiente, recursos útiles en el campus y otros eventos informativos. Si bien nunca podrán recuperar el tiempo perdido durante la infancia de los hijos, apoyar en forma activa a los estudiantes durante el verano antes de comenzar la universidad, le permitirá a los padres garantizar el éxito de una de las transiciones más importantes en la vida de sus hijos. </p>
CATHTML 5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,03C3BA21-5056-9A4B-6C6DDCB7285C3372,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:29.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:09:48.533
DESCRIPTION We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child before they start college.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child before they start college. Learn more.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child before they start college. Learn more.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Paying for College: What You Need to do Now Before Your Teen Starts College in the Fall
LASTUPDATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 1AB462D0-15ED-11E5-959C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2015-06-22 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Paying for College: What You Need to do Now
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Paying for College: What You Need to Do Now
SHORTTITLEES Pagar la universidad
SOCIALTITLE Paying for College: What You Need to do Now
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER While dealing with sadness of sending a child off to college, parents may find it hard to help their student focus on the tasks they need to complete before they leave for campus in the fall. We've compiled a list of important items to talk about with your child about before they start college.
TEASERES Hace algunos veranos me estaba preparando para enviar a mi hijo a la universidad.
TEASERIMAGE 449B8590-193A-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Paying for College: What You Need to do Now Before Your Teen Starts College in the Fall
TITLEES Pagar la universidad: qué debes saber antes de que tu hijo comience las clases en otoño
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET What you need to know about paying for college - take some tips via @EducationNation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 909D5680-7CB6-11E4-96B50050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

College and Career

There’s perhaps no bigger change than graduating high school. No matter the path, there are still ways to support your child’s journey to adulthood.

Recommended

graduate

Guide to Continuing Education After High School: Sorting Through the Options

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Continuing education after high school is a path that many students take. However, what may seem natural for some students may be completely wrong for others. Gone are the days of specific grade-by-grade guidelines of where your student should be in their studies. The options can seem overwhelming. Once your teen has decided to pursue education after high school, you may have a lot of questions. What is right for them? Is there a difference between colleges and universities? How do I know if my teen should pursue an associate or bachelor’s degree? And what does technical education even mean? Let’s break it down. </p>
BODYES <p>Sin embargo, lo que puede parecer natural para algunos estudiantes, puede ser completamente incorrecto para otros. Han quedado atrás los días de las pautas específicas de grado por grado respecto del nivel de estudios en que tu hijo debería estar. Las opciones pueden parecer abrumadoras. Una vez que tu hijo adolescente haya decidido continuar estudiando después de la escuela secundaria, es posible que tengas muchas preguntas. ¿Cuál es la correcta para tu hijo? ¿Existe una diferencia entre los <em>colleges</em> y las universidades? ¿Cómo sé si mi hijo adolescente debe estudiar para obtener un título técnico (<em>associate degree</em>) o de grado (<em>bachelor degree</em>)? ¿Y qué significa incluso la educación técnica? Vayamos por partes. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD,092B9C9E-5056-9A4B-6C782E9EDBBACE5D,D5F2F091-5056-9A4B-6CE6BBB8DA5492EA
CMLABEL Guide to Continuing Education After High School: Sorting Through the Options
CREATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-29 14:21:07.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:06.743
DESCRIPTION Making the decision to pursue continued education can lead to a lot of questions. What is right for your student?
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT The possibilities are endless, here’s what to consider.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Guide to Continuing Education After High School: Sorting Through the Options
LASTUPDATEDBY jamief_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 79B82090-14AC-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-29 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Guide to Continuing Education After High School
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Guide to Continuing Education After High School
SHORTTITLEES Guía para continuar con la educación después de la escuela secundaria
SOCIALTITLE Kids unsure what to do after high school?
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Once your teen has decided to pursue education after high school, you may have a lot of questions.
TEASERES Continuar con la educación después de la escuela secundaria es un camino que toman muchos estudiantes.
TEASERIMAGE 53DD47A0-22C2-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE Guide to Continuing Education After High School: Sorting Through the Options
TITLEES Guía para continuar con la educación después de la escuela secundaria: análisis de opciones
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Making the decision to pursue continued education can lead to a lot of questions. What is right for your student?
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 E713E2A0-14AC-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
2 FAF70C80-1942-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
3 1DC61CF0-14AD-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
4 28E3CDB0-13F6-11E7-9E040050569A4B6C
5 4C1DF960-14AD-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
6 5924EF60-14AD-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
7 AC71AB70-1978-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
8 D0FB7E50-14AD-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
9 F9F37830-14AD-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
10 E6EEA0D0-31CB-11E7-94800050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Family of three

Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” While this is nothing to be ashamed about—in fact sharing real-life experiences can provide really important wisdom to your kids—the world looks different today than it did when you were in college. In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted. Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.</p>
BODYES <p>Como padre, probablemente hayas comenzado una oración diciendo: “Cuando yo estudiaba…” Si bien no es nada de lo debas avergonzarte —de hecho compartir experiencias de la vida real puede aportarles sabiduría importante a tus hijos— el mundo es diferente hoy de lo que era <em>cuando</em> <em>tú estabas en la universidad</em>. En realidad, todo el enfoque hacia la vida, el trabajo y el amor ha sufrido un cambio drástico para los adultos jóvenes. A continuación se tratan algunos cambios importantes para tener en cuenta mientras tu hijo adolescente parte hacia la universidad. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CMLABEL Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-03-31 17:35:32.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:05.713
DESCRIPTION As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about the important changes to recognize about the current college scene:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT As a parent, you’ve probably started a sentence with “When I was in school…” Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LEGACYTYPE [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID F6F12A30-1659-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-03-31 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Why College Is Not the Same as It Used to Be
SEOTITLEES La universidad no es lo mismo que cuando yo estudiaba
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted.
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER In reality, the entire approach to life and work and love for young adults has dramatically shifted.
TEASERES En realidad, todo el enfoque hacia la vida, el trabajo y el amor ha sufrido un cambio drástico para los adultos jóvenes.
TEASERIMAGE 32BFD5F0-2151-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE Why College Is Not the Same as When I Was in School
TITLEES Por qué la universidad no es lo mismo que cuando yo estudiaba
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Here are some important changes to recognize as your teen heads off to college (via @EducationNation)
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceEditorialSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAEItems
array
1 E7617100-165A-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
2 8C7BAD40-165B-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
3 23331550-1983-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
4 CFDC0F30-165B-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
5 15C19560-165C-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
6 4B660930-165C-11E7-89C40050569A4B6C
7 0617E400-1B1D-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 31FB78E0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
2 42715070-2A8B-11E3-823F0050569A5318
3 A2B84030-2A93-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Guy in Library

Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College? How to Know

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>There are a variety of ways in which teens can be <a href="/benchmarks/what-if-my-teen-is-not-ready-for-college"><em>college-ready</em>;</a> and many ways they might not be. They may have perfect grades, but cannot do their own laundry. They may have all the confidence in the world, but struggle to write an essay. Certain <a href="/advice-lists/8-life-skills-your-teen-needs-before-moving-out">life skills</a> are extremely important for your teen to have before living on their own, but to succeed in college, your teen needs to be academically ready to take on the demanding coursework. According to the <a href="http://cscsr.org/Journal.html">Journal of College Retention</a> from the Center for the Study of College Student Retention, only 50% of students who enter higher education actually earn a bachelor’s degree. Ensuring that your student is academically prepared is the first step toward the ultimate goal of seeing them start and complete their college education. Here’s what your teen needs in order to be academically prepared for college:</p>
BODYES <p>Existen diversas maneras en que los adolescentes pueden estar <a href="/benchmarks/what-if-my-teen-is-not-ready-for-college">preparados para la universidad</a>; y muchas maneras en las que podrían no estarlo. Es posible que tengan calificaciones perfectas, pero no sepan lavarse la ropa. Es posible que tengan toda la confianza del mundo, pero que tengan dificultades para escribir un ensayo. Hay determinadas <a href="/advice-lists/8-life-skills-your-teen-needs-before-moving-out">habilidades de la vida</a> que es muy importante que tu hijo tenga antes de vivir solo, pero para tener éxito en la universidad, tu hijo necesita estar académicamente preparado para hacer frente a un exigente programa de estudios.  Según el  <a href="http://cscsr.org/Journal.html">Journal of College Retention</a> del Centro para el Estudio de Retención de Estudiantes Universitarios, solo el 50% de los estudiantes que ingresan en el sistema de educación superior obtienen, en efecto, un título de cuatro años. Asegurarte de que tu hijo esté académicamente preparado es el primer paso hacia la meta máxima de verlo comenzar y terminar su educación universitaria. A continuación se indica lo que tu hijo necesita para estar académicamente preparado para la universidad:</p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45FAA2F-5056-9A4B-6CEE346B20D7951A,F46095CF-5056-9A4B-6C8ACFDFB72EAE6E,2B652CD7-5056-9A4B-6C50422D2FDBFE56,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD
CREATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-04 18:07:50.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-07-28 09:49:42.153
DESCRIPTION Ensuring that your student is academically prepared is the first step toward the ultimate goal of seeing them start and complete their college education.
DESCRIPTIONES Existen diversas maneras en que los adolescentes pueden estar preparados para la universidad.
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit on how to tell if your child is ready to take on college academics:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Here’s how to tell.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College? How to Know
LASTUPDATEDBY estapk_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 23331550-1983-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-04 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College?
SEOTITLEES ¿Está mi hijo académicamente preparado para la universidad?
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES ¿Está mi hijo académicamente preparado para la universidad?
SOCIALTITLE Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College?
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER There are a variety of ways in which teens can be college-ready; and many ways they might not be.
TEASERES Existen diversas maneras en que los adolescentes pueden estar preparados para la universidad; y muchas maneras en las que podrían no estarlo.
TEASERIMAGE A6E36320-204D-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE Is My Teen Academically Prepared for College? How to Know
TITLEES ¿Está mi hijo académicamente preparado para la universidad? Cómo averiguarlo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Is your teen ready for the rigor of college academics? This guide will help you tell (via @EducationNation)
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceTipSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAdviceTipItems
array
1 4444DA70-1984-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
2 51685920-1984-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
3 34008050-1FB1-11E7-80C10050569A4B6C
4 7BAB2280-1984-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
5 17FE5C60-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
6 2BD3E020-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
7 40C6E1D0-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
8 4A55EF20-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
9 5C91E720-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
10 6A5C0610-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
11 7B1D6C00-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
12 93E2D270-1985-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
13 0CCF3070-1981-11E7-BCD00050569A4B6C
aFiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 F89E37B0-220B-11E3-A33B0050569A5318
2 7F360C40-220B-11E3-A4E40050569A5318
3 B757E830-2A87-11E3-823F0050569A5318
4 C60D4D00-249E-11E3-AD580050569A5318

classroom

Countering the Community College Stigma

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Community college is a great opportunity for all students, including the most high-performing ones. However, if your teen is considering going to a community college, they may encounter some negative stigma. Your teen should recognize community college as a valuable option after high school. Encourage your student to explore and visit community colleges when they are deciding what education they want to pursue. Here are some of the ways you can talk to your student about considering community college and offsetting the stigma. Start a conversation with these questions:</p> <blockquote> <p> “How are community colleges more or less challenging than four-year colleges?”</p> </blockquote> <p>You can start by talking directly to your teen about the stigma of community colleges being less challenging than four-year schools. Ask your student why they may have these misconceptions. Talk with your student about the academic rigor at community colleges, which can be just as good, and sometimes better, than the curriculum at four-year colleges. Stephen J. Handel, Associate Vice President of Undergraduate Admissions for the University of California system, says parents and students need to take community college seriously and not underestimate their rigor or value. Community colleges often have small class sizes and a lot of opportunities to work directly with the professors. Some community colleges offer honors programs, which add more rigor to the classroom experience and workload. Some departments, professors and programs will be stronger than others, so additional research should be done to find out more about each school. You should explore programs with your student to get a sense of what they want the most out of their experience in college and beyond.</p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <p>“Who goes to community colleges? Can you see yourself exploring this option?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Share information about who attends community colleges with your student so they learn more about the student body. Community colleges make up the largest sector of American postsecondary education, enrolling <a href="http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Documents/AACCFactSheetsR2.pdf">45-percent</a> of all U.S. undergraduates. They also enroll a much more diverse student body than most four-year colleges, with first-generation students, single parents, and students with disabilities making up a significant portion of the <a href="http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Documents/AACCFactSheetsR2.pdf">student</a> population. The range of students who attend community colleges is a great way for students to be exposed to many different people and learn to interact with all walks of life. Just like four-year institutions, students can develop strong ties and meaningful relationships that can last a lifetime. Encourage your student to consider how they might fit in at a community college.</p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <p>“How does the cost of community college differ from a four-year college or university?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Perhaps the greatest draw for many students (and parents!) considering community college is the cost. As a parent, you need to have a conversation with your teen about money and <a href="/topics/financial-literacy#paying-for-college">paying for college</a>. This conversation can take many forms, and if your student is considering community college, it is a good idea to highlight the financial benefits of community college. This can be especially important for students who are paying for college themselves. Handel says community colleges can be a huge bargain, with tuition and fees often much lower than four-year colleges and universities. As a result, community colleges are worth exploring for all students, not just those with financial barriers. Talk about the value of the education compared to the price tag. Experts agree; it is a myth to say that community colleges are “less than” four-year institutions because they are less expensive. Community colleges are cheaper for many reasons, including local district support and lower overhead costs. Because they are not research institutions and do not have graduate-level facilities, overhead costs like rent, building maintenance, utilities, and marketing costs are much lower.</p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <p>“How could starting at a community college help you achieve your goals in attending your dream school?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Your teen might not know the answer to this question, but it may get them thinking about their options. If your teen has a specific college or university in mind, but the cost or application requirements are barriers to getting there, a community college is a great place to start. Some students know they want to eventually go to a four-year college, and starting by earning an associate degree at a two-year college can be a good option to getting there. You can talk to your teen about community college as a pathway to their goals. Handel says students who have a plan coming in to community college are more likely to be successful in navigating the path of <a href="/advice-lists/5-ways-to-make-transferring-from-a-two-year-college-to-a-four-year-college-easier">transferring from a two-year to a four-year institution</a>. By saving money and establishing their academic competitiveness, your student will be taking important steps at a community college to achieving their goals.</p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <p>“What kind of careers could you explore through a community college education?”</p> </blockquote> <p>For some students, community college makes more sense than four-year colleges or universities for the careers they want to pursue. Talk to your teen about the different programs community colleges offer and the careers they can lead to. Your teen may not realize that a community college education is the best fit for their specific career path. And some teens might not even realize certain jobs exist! Talk to a school counselor about these different options early. With your teen, explore a wide range of jobs and career paths, and the education needed to get there. Check out the <a href="/advice-lists/top-9-highest-paying-jobs-that-require-an-associate-degree">top nine highest paying jobs that require an associate degree</a>.</p> <p> </p> <blockquote> <p>“Who do you know that has attended a community college?”</p> </blockquote> <p>By highlighting successful friends or family members who attended community colleges, your student will likely be more inclined to consider it as a valuable option. Consider mentioning some famous celebrities who went to community college, like Morgan Freeman, Steve Jobs, Eddie Murphy, George Lucas, Hallie Berry, and Queen Latifah, to name just <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gobankingrates/20-rich-and-famous-commun_b_7546150.html" target="_blank">a few</a>. If your teen can see some people in their real life and some people they look up to who went to community college, it might make the prospect much more real and exciting to them.</p> <p> </p> <p>These questions are a starting point to the many conversations you’ll likely have about continuing education. Take a look at this <a href="/advice-editorial/guide-to-continuing-education-after-high-school-sorting-through-the-options">guide to education after high school</a> for more information and options. And it never hurts to have options! Encourage your student to research community college programs along with four-year programs and technical programs. Help your teen see that there are a wide range of possibilities for them, and pursing a program at a community college can be a great way to get there.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
BODYES <p>Estudiar en un community college es una excelente oportunidad para todos los jóvenes, incluso los de mejor desempeño académico. Sin embargo, si tu hijo está evaluando asistir a una de estas instituciones, tal vez deba enfrentarse a cierta estigmatización. Debería saber que los <em>community colleges</em> también son opciones válidas para continuar estudiando después de la escuela secundaria. Alienta a a tu hijo para que se informe y visite este tipo de instituciones cuando esté evaluando qué tipo de educación desea continuar. En este artículo te proponemos diferentes formas para que puedas encarar el tema con tu hijo y revertir el estigma de los <em>community colleges</em>. Te sugerimos iniciar una conversación planteando las siguientes preguntas:</p> <blockquote> <p>“¿Por qué crees que un <em>community college</em> es menos exigente que una carrera universitaria de 4 años?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Puedes iniciar la charla abordando directamente el mito de que una carrera en un <em>community college </em>es menos exigente que una carrera universitaria de 4 años. Pregúntale a tu hijo por qué cree que la gente tiene esta idea equivocada. Explícale que el rigor académico de estos institutos puede ser igual de bueno, e incluso superior,  que el de los planes de estudio de las carreras universitarias tradicionales. Stephen J. Handel, Vicepresidente adjunto de admisiones de pregrado de la Universidad de California, explica que tanto los padres como  los estudiantes deben tomar en serio a los <em>community colleges</em> y no subestimar sus niveles de exigencia ni su valor. Muchas veces el tamaño de las clases es más reducido y esto permite trabajar en forma directa con los profesores. En algunos institutos se ofrecen programas para estudiantes destacados, que son más exigentes en cuanto a las clases y la carga horaria. Algunos departamentos, profesores y planes de estudio serán mejores que otros, por eso recomendamos investigar para conocer más sobre cada institución. Te recomendamos que acompañes a tu hijo en esta investigación para que pueda comenzar a descubrir qué desea para su experiencia educativa.</p> <blockquote> <p>“¿Quién asiste a un <em>community college</em>? ¿Te ves a ti mismo analizando esta opción?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Si alguien que conoces asiste a un <em>community college</em>, compártelo con tu hijo para que pueda conocer más sobre el cuerpo estudiantil. Estos institutos representan el sector más vasto de la educación terciaria en los Estados Unidos, con un <a href="http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Documents/AACCFactSheetsR2.pdf">45%</a>  de los inscritos entre todos los estudiantes de pregrado. También reciben a un cuerpo estudiantil con mayor diversidad que las universidades tradicionales. La <a href="http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Documents/AACCFactSheetsR2.pdf">población</a> estudiantil está conformada en gran parte por estudiantes de primera generación, padres solteros y estudiantes discapacitados. La variedad de estudiantes que asiste a estas instituciones es una excelente forma de exponer a tu hijo a diferentes realidades y que pueda interactuar con personas de distintos orígenes. Al igual que en las universidades tradicionales, los estudiantes pueden desarrollar amistades y relaciones que durarán para toda la vida. Pídele a tu hijo que analice cómo se sentiría él en un <em>community college</em>.</p> <blockquote> <p>“¿Cuál es la diferencia económica entre un <em>community college</em> y una carrera universitaria de 4 años?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Tal vez el el costo sea el principal atractivo de un <em>community college</em> para muchos estudiantes (¡y para sus padres!). Es necesario que hables con tu hijo sobre este tema y <a href="/topics/financial-literacy#paying-for-college">el pago de la educación</a>. Esta conversación puede darse de varias formas, pero si tu hijo está pensando en asistir a un <em>community college</em> es una buena idea destacar los beneficios financieros que representa. Esto puede ser de particular importancia para los estudiantes que pagan ellos mismos sus estudios. Handel explica que estas instituciones pueden ser una excelente propuesta, ya que la matrícula y los cargos suelen ser mucho más bajos que los de las universidades tradicionales. De este modo, los <em>community colleges</em> son una opción que vale la pena ser tenida en cuenta por todos los estudiantes, no solo por aquellos con obstáculos financieros. Habla con tu hijo del valor de la educación comparada con la etiqueta del precio. Los expertos concuerdan en que es un mito que los <em>community colleges</em> “son menos” que las universidades tradicionales porque son más económicos. El que sean más asequibles se debe a muchas razones, entre ellas la ayuda que reciben de los distritos locales y los costos generales menores. Como no son instituciones de investigación y no ofrecen servicios adicionales a los graduados, los costos de renta, mantenimiento, servicios públicos y publicidad son mucho menores.</p> <blockquote> <p>“¿Cómo puede ayudarte que estudies en un <em>community college</em> a alcanzar tu objetivo de asistir a la universidad que siempre quisiste?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Tal vez tu hijo no lo sepa, pero lo hará pensar en las opciones disponibles. Si tu hijo tiene pensado asistir a una universidad específica, pero el costo o los requisitos para postularse son un obstáculo para ese objetivo, un <em>community college</em> es un buen punto de partida. Algunos estudiantes saben que, eventualmente, querrán cursar una carrera universitaria de 4 años, y conseguir un título técnico (asociate degree) en 2 años es una buena alternativa para alcanzar ese objetivo. Habla con tu hijo sobre la posibilidad de considerar un <em>community college</em> como una alternativa para alcanzar sus objetivos. Handel aclara que los estudiantes de estas instituciones que tienen un plan en  mente, en general, son más exitosos al <a href="/advice-lists/5-ways-to-make-transferring-from-a-two-year-college-to-a-four-year-college-easier">transitar el cambio hacia una carrera de cuatro años</a>. Al ahorrar dinero y determinar su competencia académica, tu hijo estará dando grandes pasos hacia el cumplimiento de sus objetivos.</p> <blockquote> <p>“¿Qué tipo de carreras te interesan entre las que se ofrecen en los <em>community college</em>s?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Para algunos estudiantes, por el tipo de carreras que les interesan, los <em>community colleges</em> son mucho más convenientes que las universidades tradicionales. Habla con tu hijo sobre los diferentes programas que ofrecen los <em>community colleges</em> y para qué carreras pueden servirle. Tu hijo tal vez no sepa que una institución de este tipo es la mejor opción para sus intereses específicos. Incluso, es posible que algunos jóvenes tal vez desconozcan la existencia de ciertas especializaciones. Consulta con un consejero escolar sobre estas diferentes opciones, y analiza con tu hijo la variedad de carreras y ámbitos de trabajo a los que podría acceder. Conoce <a href="/advice-lists/top-9-highest-paying-jobs-that-require-an-associate-degree">los nueve trabajos mejor pagos que requieren un título técnico</a>.</p> <blockquote> <p>“¿A quién conoces que haya asistido a un <em>community college</em>?”</p> </blockquote> <p>Al destacar la experiencia exitosa de amigos o familiares que hayan asistido a <em>community colleges</em>, es probable que tu hijo se sienta más inclinado a considerarlo como una opción valiosa. También puedes hacer referencia a varias celebridades que hayan cursado sus estudios en <em>community colleges</em>, como por ejemplo Morgan Freeman, Steve Jobs, Eddie Murphy, George Lucas, Hallie Berry y Queen Latifah, por mencionar <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gobankingrates/20-rich-and-famous-commun_b_7546150.html" target="_blank">algunos</a>. Si tu hijo ve que tanto las personas comunes de su vida cotidiana como los ídolos que admira fueron a una institución de este tipo, podría considerarlo como una perspectiva más factible y emocionante.</p> <p> </p> <p>Estas preguntas son solo un disparador para que puedas conversar con tu hijo sobre sus planes de seguir estudiando. Echa un vistazo a esta <a href="/advice-editorial/guide-to-continuing-education-after-high-school-sorting-through-the-options">guía para la educación</a> después de la escuela secundaria para más información y para conocer otras opciones. ¡Siempre es bueno contar con varias opciones! Anima a tu hijo a informarse sobre los programas disponibles en los <em>community colleges</em>, en las universidades tradicionales y en los institutos técnicos. Ayuda a tu hijo a descubrir la gran cantidad de posibilidades que existen, y que estudiar en un <em>community college</em> puede ser un excelente punto de partida para alcanzar sus metas.</p> <p> </p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,2B875370-5056-9A4B-6C0470D5C53122DD
CMLABEL Countering the Community College Stigma
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-13 12:47:30.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:43:58.047
DESCRIPTION Explore some of the ways you can talk to your student about considering community college and offsetting the stigma with these conversation starters.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT From Parent Toolkit, check out these ways you can talk to your student about considering community college and offsetting the stigma with these conversation starters.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Explore some of the ways you can talk to your student about considering community college and offsetting the stigma with these conversation starters.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Countering the Community College Stigma
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID E06DA860-2068-11E7-92430050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-06 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Countering the Community College Stigma
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES Revertir el estigma de los community colleges
SOCIALTITLE Countering the Community College Stigma
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Explore some of the ways you can talk to your student about considering community college and offsetting the stigma.
TEASERES Te proponemos diferentes formas para que puedas encarar el tema con tu hijo y revertir el estigma de los community colleges.
TEASERIMAGE C796BF20-22C0-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE Countering the Community College Stigma
TITLEES Revertir el estigma de los community colleges
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Explore ways to talk to your student about community college and offsetting the stigma via @EducationNation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 B753A180-1EFD-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
2 C60D4D00-249E-11E3-AD580050569A5318
3 B757E830-2A87-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Girl with Books

12 Questions Answered for Parents of Students Considering Community Colleges

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>The community college path is beneficial for many students. Community college students make up <a href="http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Documents/AACCFactSheetsR2.pdf">45-percent</a> of all U.S. undergraduates. But as a parent, you may have a lot of questions about whether the community college path is right for your young adult. Just like four-year institutions, community colleges differ greatly from school to school.</p>
BODYES <p>Para muchos estudiantes, continuar con su educación en un <em>community college</em> es beneficioso. El alumnado de estos institutos representa el <a href="http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Documents/AACCFactSheetsR2.pdf">45%</a> de todos los estudiantes de grado en los Estados Unidos. Pero como padre, tal vez tengas muchas preguntas que te hagan dudar de si este camino es el adecuado para tu hijo. Al igual que las universidades tradicionales, los <em>community colleges</em> también tienen sus diferencias. </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45BB30F-5056-9A4B-6C70FB2942D474FA,2B7D7952-5056-9A4B-6C874B339B7CDD68,F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50,D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD
CREATEDBY coreysnyder_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-04 16:52:56.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:36.43
DESCRIPTION As a parent, you may have a lot of questions about whether the community college path is right for your young adult.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit. 12 Questions About Community College Answered:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT As a parent, you may have a lot of questions about whether the community college path is right for your young adult.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL 12 Questions Answered for Parents of Students Considering Community Colleges
LASTUPDATEDBY coreysnyder_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID 12 Questions Answered for Parents of Students Considering Community Colleges
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID AC71AB70-1978-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC D5EF7F98-5056-9A4B-6C46BCB929D420BD
PTOPIC F45D032C-5056-9A4B-6CFC2984D8AE9F50
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-04 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 12 Questions About Community College Answered
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 12 Questions About Community College Answered
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER As a parent, you may have a lot of questions about whether the community college path is right for your young adult.
TEASERES Para muchos estudiantes, continuar con su educación en un community college es beneficioso.
TEASERIMAGE E57FA430-1FC7-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE 12 Questions Answered for Parents of Students Considering Community Colleges
TITLEES 12 preguntas de padres cuyos hijos están pensando en estudiar en un community college
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET As a parent, you may have a lot of questions about whether the community college path is right for your young adult.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceListSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAdviceListItems
array
1 51B93941-1979-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
2 65368AE0-1979-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
3 8BF81CC0-1979-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
4 79B82090-14AC-11E7-872B0050569A4B6C
5 AB52B170-1979-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
6 BD428540-1979-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
7 D4082410-1979-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
8 1957ABD0-197A-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
9 30CFAAB0-197A-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
10 C47DC4E0-1934-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
11 62130E50-197A-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
12 836D91B0-197A-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
13 8E82F0E0-197A-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
14 F2A9DF60-13EF-11E7-9E040050569A4B6C
15 A6C56BB0-197A-11E7-A09D0050569A4B6C
aFiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 C60D4D00-249E-11E3-AD580050569A5318
2 B753A180-1EFD-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
3 E0A125B0-3FD8-11E3-A29D0050569A5318
4 B757E830-2A87-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Moving Out

8 Life Skills Your Teen Needs Before Moving Out

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>When high school graduates move out of the house, many parents wonder “Are they ready?” or “Will they be ok?” Ideally, you have been slowly giving your child more and more responsibility over the years, and they are ready to be fully independent before moving out. But in reality, sometimes schedules and other life demands can get in the way of teaching important – if basic—life skills. Here are eight things our experts say every kid should be able to do in order to be a responsible, independent young adult.</p> <p>Can your teen...</p>
BODYES <p>Cuando los hijos se mudan para ir a la universidad muchos padres se preguntan “¿Está preparado?”, “¿Estará bien?”. Lo ideal es que poco a poco, y a medida que tus hijos crecen, les asignes cada vez más responsabilidades y tareas. De esta manera, estarán preparados para ser totalmente independientes antes de irse. Pero la realidad es que las actividades cotidianas y otras exigencias de la vida suelen interponerse en el camino de la enseñanza de estas habilidades clave, si no básicas. Estas son las ocho cosas que, según nuestros expertos, todo adolescente debe ser capaz de hacer para ser un adulto joven responsable e independiente. </p> <p>¿Tu hijo sabe... </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F4633AEF-5056-9A4B-6CFC734C17EE9A78,2B6C3F55-5056-9A4B-6C81272D53A7541E
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-04 10:12:09.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:31:36.757
DESCRIPTION Here are 8 things our experts say every kid should be able to do in order to be a responsible, independent young adult.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about essential skills teens should have before moving away from home:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Here are 8 things Parent Toolkit experts say every kid should be able to do in order to be a responsible, independent young adult.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL 8 Life Skills Your Teen Needs Before Moving Out
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID AF9EF100-1940-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 9F272A50-BC92-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F4633AEF-5056-9A4B-6CFC734C17EE9A78
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-04 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 8 Life Skills Your Teen Needs Before Moving Out
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 8 Life Skills Your Teen Needs Before Moving Out
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Explore what our experts say every kid should be able to do in order to be a responsible, independent young adult.
TEASERES Cuando los hijos se mudan para ir a la universidad muchos padres se preguntan “¿Está preparado?”, “¿Estará bien?”.
TEASERIMAGE BFD913B0-1FD1-11E7-9CA10050569A4B6C
TITLE 8 Life Skills Your Teen Needs Before Moving Out
TITLEES Ocho habilidades clave que tu hijo necesitará para cuando se mude
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Make sure your teen has these skills down before they leave the nest (via @EducationNation)
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceListSeries
VERSIONID [empty string]
aAdviceListItems
array
1 D33A9550-1941-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
2 F52AF010-1941-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
3 0E56B970-1942-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
4 1AB70F30-1942-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
5 C09BDBF0-13F3-11E7-9E040050569A4B6C
6 38203420-1942-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
7 4CACD2E0-1942-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
8 57469970-1942-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
9 68FF7EC0-1942-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
aFiles
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09712-C276-9F15-FD7DB04AFF729B25
2 42715070-2A8B-11E3-823F0050569A5318
3 31FB78E0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

Featured Experts