Looking for Early Education?

Looking for Middle School?

Elementary School

In elementary school, your child experiences many changes, including shifting friendships, a stronger sense of their own beliefs, and more rigorous academics.

Academics

Understanding the concepts your children are learning in school can help you support them at home. Find ways to support them throughout elementary school.

Math

Math is a challenging subject for many students, but it doesn’t have to be. Discover practical uses for math, fun study strategies and more to improve your child’s math skills.

English Language Arts

There are lots of creative ways to improve your child's reading and writing skills. Dig into these helpful strategies below.

Recommended

Painted girl

Guiding Our Children Through School Transitions: Elementary School

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1kWpwnI
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>My daughter recently sent me a picture of my granddaughter when she was two years old. Her comment under the picture was “Tears.” I totally understood her, the baby she loved and protected, the one who was so innocent and full of wonder, was about to “graduate” from kindergarten. Where does the time go? I think every parent of a school-age child wishes that they could turn back time. It’s hard to think of them leaving the nest and heading off to the school bus on that very first day. We see the kids full of smiles and excitement but behind them we see moms and dads fighting back tears. Sitting here writing this, I fast forward 12 years and see those roles exchanged, the kids fight back tears as they leave home for college while mom and dad are full of smiles and excitement knowing their kids are out of the house for a while. How perspectives change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=320465F0-2131-11E3-9EC10050569A5318">RELATED: Check out what your child will be learning this year in Kindergarten.</a></p> <p>Parents and children deal with a number of school transitions throughout life. As parents, we want the best for our kids, and we want them to be happy, successful and fulfilled during their school life. Parents sometimes struggle with how and what to do to make this possibility more of a reality. Here are a few ideas that might keep everyone smiling.</p> <p>Transitioning into Kindergarten</p> <ul> <li> <p>Always, ALWAYS talk positively about going to school. Your child will zero in on your emotions and feelings like a homing pigeon headed back after a long flight. Be positive and excited for this new venture.</p> </li> <li> <p>Learn the ropes. When your local school has parent meetings about the transition into kindergarten, attend! These opportunities will allow you to meet important school personnel, like the principal, teachers, counselor, and nurse. You will also learn about any before-school activities that may be taking place, as well as important dates.</p> </li> <li> <p>Many elementary schools offer a “jump start” program for incoming kindergartners. My best advice would be to make this a priority for your child to attend. These programs allow friendships to begin forming, and they give children a foundation for how school works; the types of things they’ll do each day, expected behavior, routines, etc. Find out the dates of these activities early so you can plan your vacation time around them.</p> </li> <li> <p>Orientation activities usually occur right before school starts. Go! Orientation allows your child the chance to do things like ride the bus, find their way to their classroom, get acquainted or re-acquainted with the teacher and other children, and just generally familiarize themselves with school and the classroom.</p> </li> <li> <p>Set a reasonable bedtime and start a “prep” routine. Being in school half or all day can be a big change for these little guys. They will be exhausted for the first few weeks. Expect crabbiness and whininess. It will pass. Making bedtime a bit earlier, especially during the transition, will be a good idea. It’s also a good idea to set a routine for getting clothing picked out and having the backpack readied each evening. Those things make the mornings much less chaotic.<br /><br /></p> </li> <li> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/138020462" width="600" height="337" frameborder="0"></iframe><br /><br /></p> </li> <li> <p>Be prepared for crying. Not yours, your child’s. I’ll talk about your crying in a minute. If your child starts fussing and crying about going to school, it’s imperative that you hold firm. Of course, talk about their concerns. Address any fears calmly and reasonably. Let the school staff know that this is an issue. School counselors can work magic with situations like this; don’t hesitate to talk with them. Be firm and consistent in taking your child to school each day, regardless of whether or not they want to go. Your child has to see that you are ok with school and you are making it a priority. The teachers and staff are experienced with children who have separation issues. Leave your child when the teacher or staff person tells you to go, and trust that they will take care of things well. Honestly, they will let you know how things are progressing. Once in the car, it’s ok to shed some tears. It’s hard leaving your little one, especially if s/he is upset. Typically, these situations work themselves out, and all is well.</p> </li> <li> <p>Questions or concerns. During the course of the school year, if you have questions or concerns, please contact the school. You want to have the right information, not rumors. Having the right information allows you to make better decisions. Be careful about listening to the stories or advice of other parents as the needs of their child may not be like the needs of your child. Ask your questions, and don’t worry about asking questions. School personnel appreciate it when parents ask clarifying questions. It allows the school the opportunity to give correct information, and it helps to inform your decisions and/or calm your nerves. If something happens in life that may impact your child’s school life, let the teacher or school counselor know. They can be prepared to help your child through whatever may be happening, and make school a safe and secure environment for him/her.</p> </li> <li> <p>Homework and reading with your child. Start early in setting up a specific time and place for your child to do homework. I’d suggest it be at the same time each day and in someplace where there is no TV or other technological distractions. Your presence should be very noticeable. Let your children know that you are there if they need you but, until they say there’s a need, allow your children to do their work on their own. Here’s what I’ve often told parents: “if you step in and do things for your child, the message you may be sending is this: ‘honey, I love you but you are not capable.’” We want to empower our children to do things and attempt to do things on their own. If they make a mistake, it’s ok. That mistake allows them to re-learn, and it teaches them that they don’t have to be perfect. It’s ok to make mistakes. One other suggestion on homework is building in a time for you to read to your child and for him/her to read to you as they learn. Even if there is no homework, make reading together an evening event. Choose fun books, and make this a quality time for learning and togetherness. Reading is a critical skill, so the more practice our children get, the better.</p> </li> </ul> <p>I hope these are helpful tips for you! Stay tuned for tips into the world of <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A0A0E0C0-1365-11E4-98390050569A5318">middle school</a>!</p> <p><em>This piece is part of a series examining how parents can help children through school transitions. Check out some of the other posts about <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=11D8DA50-1360-11E4-98390050569A5318">starting middle school</a>, <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=DD2D6520-1362-11E4-98390050569A5318">transitioning to high school</a> and <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=A0A0E0C0-1365-11E4-98390050569A5318">sending kids off to college</a>. </em></p>
BODYES <p>Hace poco, mi hija me envió una foto de mi nieta cuando tenía dos años. El comentario que aparecía debajo de la foto era: “Lágrimas”. La entendí perfectamente: la bebé a la que ella adoraba y protegía, tan inocente y llena de sorpresas, estaba a punto de “graduarse” del kindergarten. ¿Adónde se va el tiempo? Creo que todos los padres de niños en edad escolar desearían poder volver el tiempo atrás. Es difícil aceptar que dejan el nido y se suben al autobús escolar ese primer día. Observamos a los niños sonrientes y entusiasmados, pero detrás de ellos vemos a mamás y papás que se esfuerzan por contener las lágrimas. Mientras escribo esto, me imagino qué pasará en 12 años cuando los roles se intercambien, serán los hijos quienes traten de no llorar al dejar su casa para comenzar la universidad, y veremos a mamá y papá sonrientes y entusiasmados porque sus hijos estarán un tiempo fuera de casa. Cómo cambia la perspectiva.</p> <p>Tanto padres como niños tienen que lidiar con una serie de transiciones escolares a lo largo de la vida. Como padres, queremos lo mejor para nuestros hijos, deseamos verlos felices, exitosos y satisfechos durante su vida escolar. En ocasiones, los padres deben esforzarse por encontrar la manera de que esto se convierta en realidad. Aquí les dejo unas ideas que tal vez les hagan el camino más fácil.</p> <h5>Transición al kindergarten</h5> <ul> <li>Siempre, SIEMPRE ten palabras positivas sobre la escuela. Tu hijo seguirá tus emociones y sentimientos, enfocado como paloma mensajera que regresa a destino después de un largo vuelo. Muéstrate positivo y entusiasmado por esta nueva aventura.</li> <li>Ponte al tanto de todo. Asiste a las reuniones para padres sobre la transición al kindergarten que realice tu escuela local. Esto te permitirá conocer miembros importantes del equipo escolar, como el director, maestros, consejero y enfermera. También podrás enterarte de actividades previas al comienzo escolar y de fechas importantes.</li> <li>Muchas escuelas primarias ofrecen un programa introductorio para los nuevos alumnos. Mi sugerencia es que tu hijo participe en esta actividad. Estos programas ayudan a que se formen las primeras amistades, y que los niños tengan una idea de cómo funciona la escuela; el tipo de actividades que harán todos los días, la conducta esperada, rutinas, etc. Averigua las fechas de estas actividades con anticipación y así podrás tenerlas en cuenta cuando organices tus vacaciones.</li> <li>Las actividades orientativas suelen desarrollarse justo antes de que comiencen las clases. ¡No se las pierdan! Este período le da a tu hijo la posibilidad de ensayar rutinas, como tomar el autobús, ubicar su aula, conocer a la maestra y a otros niños, o reencontrarse con ellos, y básicamente familiarizarse con la escuela y el salón de clases.</li> <li>Establece un horario razonable para ir a la cama y comienza una rutina de preparación. Estar en la escuela medio día o todo el día puede ser un gran cambio para estos pequeñitos. Las primeras semanas, estarán agotados. Prepárate para llantos y mal humor. Ya se pasará. Adelantar la hora de dormir, sobre todo durante la transición, es una buena idea. También es buena idea establecer una rutina para elegir la ropa y preparar la mochila todas las noches. Así las mañanas serán mucho menos caóticas.</li> <li>Prepárate para los llantos. No tuyos, sino de tu hijo. En un minuto, hablaré de tu llanto. Si tu hijo comienza a quejarse y a llorar por tener que ir a la escuela, es fundamental que te mantengas firme. Por supuesto, conversa sobre sus inquietudes. Ocúpate de sus temores en forma calma y razonable. Avisa en la escuela lo que está pasando. Los consejeros pueden hacer magia en situaciones como esta; no dudes en hablar con ellos. Mantente firme y constante en llevar a tu hijo todos los días a la escuela, sin importar que quiera ir o no. Tu hijo tiene que ver que la escuela es una prioridad. Los maestros y el resto del personal tienen experiencia para ayudar a los niños que tienen dificultades en esta etapa. Deja a tu hijo cuando la maestra u otro integrante del equipo te pidan que te vayas, confía en que saben cómo manejarse. Ellos te mantendrán al tanto de los progresos. Una vez que estés de vuelta en el auto, está permitido derramar algunas lágrimas. No es fácil dejar a tu pequeño, especialmente si se quedó triste. Casi siempre, estas situaciones se resuelven solas y todo sale bien.</li> <li>Preguntas o inquietudes. Durante el transcurso del año escolar, si te surge alguna pregunta o inquietud, comunícate con la escuela. Debes tener la información adecuada, no rumores. De esta forma, podrás tomar mejores decisiones. Ten cuidado cuando escuches historias o consejos de otros padres, porque las necesidades de sus hijos pueden no ser las mismas que las del tuyo. Pregunta lo que necesites y no temas hacerlo. El personal de la escuela valora cuando los padres hacen preguntas para aclarar alguna inquietud. Así la escuela tiene la posibilidad de dar la información correcta, y esto te ayudará a tomar decisiones o aquietar los miedos. Si ocurre algo en la vida familiar que podría afectar la vida escolar de tu hijo, informa a la maestra o al consejero. Así estarán preparados para ayudar a tu hijo en lo que esté atravesando, y hacer de la escuela un espacio seguro para él.</li> <li>Tareas y lecturas con tu hijo. Establece con anticipación un horario y un lugar específicos para que tu hijo haga su tarea. Te sugiero que sea a la misma hora todos los días y en un lugar donde no haya TV u otra distracción tecnológica. Tu presencia es importante. Es bueno que tu hijo sepa que estás allí por si te necesita, pero si no te pide ayuda, deja que se ocupe solo de su tarea. Esto es lo que suelo decirles a los padres: "si intervienes y haces las cosas por tu hijo, el mensaje que le estás dando es: “cariño, te quiero, pero tú no puedes hacerlo”. El objetivo es permitirles a los niños hacer e intentar hacer cosas por sí solos. Si se equivocan, está bien. Ese error les permite volver a aprender, y les enseña que no tienen que ser perfectos, que está bien equivocarse. Otra sugerencia respecto de la tarea es crear un momento en el que tú puedas leerle a tu hijo y que ellos puedan leerte algo a ti mientras aprenden. Aunque no haya tarea, haz de la lectura un espacio diario para ambos. Elige libros divertidos, y convierte este rato en un momento de calidad para el aprendizaje y el vínculo. Leer es una habilidad esencial, por eso cuanto más practique, mejor lo hará.</li> </ul> <p>¡Espero que estos consejos te hayan servido! ¡Síguenos para obtener más consejos sobre el mundo de la escuela intermedia!</p> <p><em>Este artículo es parte de una serie de textos que analizan cómo los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos en las transiciones escolares. Lee otras publicaciones sobre el comienzo de la escuela intermedia, la transición a la escuela secundaria y el ingreso en la universidad.</em></p>
CATHTML 30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,03C3BA21-5056-9A4B-6C6DDCB7285C3372,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:06:02.86
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:56:43.643
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Guiding Our Children Through School Transitions: Elementary School
LASTUPDATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 70BF09F0-135A-11E4-98390050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03C3BA21-5056-9A4B-6C6DDCB7285C3372
PTOPIC F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
PUBLISHDATE 2014-08-11 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Parents and children deal with a number of school transitions throughout life. As parents, we want the best for our kids, and we want them to be happy, successful and fulfilled during their school life. Parents sometimes struggle with how and what to do to make this possibility more of a reality. Here are a few ideas that might keep everyone smiling.
TEASERES Hace poco, mi hija me envió una foto de mi nieta cuando tenía dos años. El comentario que aparecía debajo de la foto era: “Lágrimas”.
TEASERIMAGE E7E37D60-208E-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
TITLE Guiding Our Children Through School Transitions: Elementary School
TITLEES Cómo guiar a nuestros hijos en las transiciones escolares: escuela primaria
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 585F9140-135A-11E4-98390050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

5 minutes to spare elementaary

5 Minutes to Spare: Elementary School

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1EUPj9m
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1YBQy47
BODY <p>Building patience, a love of reading, and healthy eating habits are all tips included in this video on supporting your elementary school student’s overall development.  </p>
BODYES <p>Crear paciencia, el amor por la lectura, y desarrollar hábitos saludables en sus alimentación son los consejos incluidos en este video sobre como apoyar a sus estudiantes de primaria en su desarrollo general.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
CREATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-09-01 18:03:44.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:32.697
DESCRIPTION Building patience, a love of reading, and healthy eating habits are all tips included in this video on supporting your elementary school student.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on tips to support your elementary school student’s overall development.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/138020462?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/138656544?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/138020462
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/138656544
FACEBOOKTEXT Building patience, a love of reading, and healthy eating habits are all tips included in this video on supporting your elementary school student’s development.
FACEBOOKTEXTES Crear paciencia, el amor por la lectura, y desarrollar hábitos saludables en sus alimentación son los consejos incluidos en este video sobre como apoyar a sus estudiantes de primaria en su desarrollo general.
LABEL 5 Minutes to Spare: Elementary School
LASTUPDATEDBY katiekreider_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 4F8A2010-50F5-11E5-8F900050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
PUBLISHDATE 2015-09-01 18:03:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Tips on Supporting Your Elementary School Student
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE 5 Minutes to Spare: Elementary School
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Tips on Supporting Your Elementary School Student
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Building patience, a love of reading, and healthy eating habits are all tips included in this video on supporting your elementary school student’s overall development. Find out more by watching the 5 Minutes to Spare video series on ParentToolkit.com!
TEASERES Crear paciencia, el amor por la lectura, y desarrollar hábitos saludables en sus alimentación son los consejos incluidos en este video sobre como apoyar a sus estudiantes de primaria en su desarrollo general.
TEASERIMAGE 15FBA510-18B5-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE 5 Minutes to Spare: Elementary School
TITLEES 5 Minutos de Sobra: Escuela Primaria
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Crear paciencia, el amor por la lectura, y desarrollar hábitos saludables en sus alimentación son los consejos incluidos en este video sobre como apoyar a sus estudiantes de primaria en su desarrollo general.
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Here's how to build patience, a love of reading, & healthy eating habits for your elementary student
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array [empty]

Kid with backpack

How to Boost Learning: Tap into Your Child’s Natural Strengths

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1G7QcFK
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>We all have some skills that come more naturally than others. Some of us are better at speaking and finding the right word, while some of us are great at solving problems or getting along with a lot of different people. Kids are the same way. Every child has his own strengths and by using those strengths you can help boost overall academic success. There’s actually an entire theory based on this, called multiple intelligences, or MI.  Harvard Professor Howard Gardner introduced the notion of multiple intelligences in his 1983 book, Frames Of Mind, where he wrote that there are eight intelligences that are directly linked to a person’s problem-solving ability. The idea is that if people could identify their strengths and their intelligences, they could apply this knowledge to their learning and help maximize their academic abilities.</p> <p>Professor Gardner identified 8 total intelligences, or eight different ways to solve problems.  The first two are often used in schools and pretty recognizable for most parents; linguistic (reading and writing) and logical-mathematical (mathematics). But there are six other areas where your child’s strengths might lie. They are spatial intelligence (used by architects, and designers,), musical (musicians), bodily-kinesthetic (athletes, surgeons, carpenters), naturalist (veterinarians, farmers, campers), and the two personal intelligences, interpersonal and intrapersonal. The interpersonal intelligence is about knowing and understanding others – think of people who are really good at “working a room” or mediating problems between coworkers. The intrapersonal intelligence is knowing and understanding yourself, which can help with stress and anger management</p> <p>The evidence for MI is around us. If we identify successful and happy adults, we see people who have strengths in many different intelligences; they’re not just people who read and write well (although they may do that). People with a strong intrapersonal intelligence, for example, find ways to capitalize on their strengths and how they learn, and put themselves in positions to achieve. They may do this at work, as part of their vocation, or it may become a hobby, that provides peace of mind and relaxation. People with a strong interpersonal intelligence gravitate to fields in which they are surrounded by others.</p> <p>The New City School, which I lead, began implementing MI in 1988. We saw it as a way to help more students learn and enable students to learn more – and we’ve been right. Students in our school learn to read and write, but there’s more. They also learn to show what they know through their drawings, by building dioramas and by creating poems. Our students tend to our garden and learn math facts by hopping and dancing. We believe in joyful learning. Students should want to go to school. MI helps us achieve that. In too many schools, there’s a narrow road to success; if you’re a good reader and writer, school comes easily. In an MI school, there are many pathways to learn. Reading and writing are intelligences which encompass key skills but other intelligences can also be used in learning.</p> <p>Outside of the school setting, parents play an essential role in helping their children develop their multiple intelligences and abilities. Knowing your child’s intelligences and expanding his MI strengths may lead to success in school; it surely will lead to greater happiness in life. Here are some strategies you can use at home to help improve your child’s learning, problem-solving skills and capacity to excel in school and beyond.</p> <p><strong>Learn the qualities associated with the different intelligences. </strong>In his book, Gardner asserts that there are eight intelligences and eight ways to solve problems. Knowing what they are is a good place to begin to develop your child’s MI further. The <a href="http://www.connectionsacademy.com/blog/posts/2013-01-18/Understanding-Your-Student-s-Learning-Style-The-Theory-of-Multiple-Intelligences.aspx">Connections Academy blog</a> does a wonderful job breaking the intelligences down in a visual way: </p> <p><strong>Identify your own strengths. </strong>Look at the MI graphic and identify your 2-3 strongest intelligences and intelligences where you are the weakest. Edutopia also has a <a href="http://www.edutopia.org/multiple-intelligences-assessment">MI assessment quiz</a> that can give you new insights into your learning preferences. Which intelligences are most obvious in your home and in how you spend your free time? Chances are, you spend most of your time engaging in your strongest intelligences, and you probably avoid the areas that are not your intelligence strengths. That’s only human nature. (I know that I do this!)</p> <p><img src="/images/main/TH-DevelopingMultipleIntelligencesImage.jpg" border="0" /></p> <p>In most households, children naturally pursue and develop the intelligences in which their parents are strongest; children see, hear, and imitate. Kids who grow up in a household with lots of music will learn to appreciate music at a young age and are more likely to enjoy and learn to play music as they get older. Similarly, a child whose parents are painters or sculptors will probably be more comfortable playing with colors and clay at an early age. I suggest, though, that you reflect on your own MI profile and push against it when you think about the kinds of experiences that you want for your child. </p> <p><strong>Use hands-on learning. </strong>It’s beneficial to your child’s learning if youprovide her with opportunities to expand upon her own strengths at home.  You can also try these strategies if you want to expand her develop her abilities in other intelligences. For example,</p> <p>- For those children who have a <strong>linguistic intelligence, or are word smart,</strong> you can set up a reading area or book nook for them to have a space to retire to and focus on their books. Or for younger children, carve out a time to read together, and ask your child to come up with another ending to the story. </p> <p>- For those who are <strong>logical-mathematical, or logic smart,</strong> you can provide them with plenty of age-appropriate puzzles or building block sets. You may also want to watch the weather report with your child and talk about the science and math behind the forecast.</p> <p>- For children who are <strong>musically inclined, or music smart,</strong> try signing them up for a music class or providing them with instruments to play. (even pots and pans can act as drums!) You may also want to play games where family members make up lyrics to the same song together.</p> <p>- For those <strong>visual/spatial learners, or children who are picture smart</strong>, make sure to stock up on items like play-doh, paints, colors or magazine cutouts. You can also ask your child to use multimedia to create a card or collage to send out to family members.</p> <p>- For those who are <strong>bodily kinesthetic intelligent, or body smart</strong>, try playing video games where the entire family can get up and dance, do a relay race outside or take part in a home improvement project together. </p> <p><strong>- If your child is naturalistic, or nature smart, </strong>a garden is a perfect learning activity. It can be a small herb garden for the windowsill, a larger vegetable garden in your backyard or you can join a community garden and tend it to it together.</p> <p>- For those who have <strong>interpersonal intelligence, or people smarts</strong>, try cooking and working on a recipe together where you have to use your collaborative skills to complete this tasty project. You may also want to volunteer at a local food bank together.</p> <p>- For those with <strong>intra personal, or self-smarts,</strong> encourage your child to keep a journal and write his thoughts down regularly, or ask him to start a blog online.</p> <p><strong>Expose your child to the “other” intelligences. </strong>It’s good for parents to consciously give children experiences in the “other” intelligences, those that are less likely to be part of their home. A mom who is a runner or a dad who is a basketball player, both heavily into the bodily-kinesthetic intelligence, may spend so much time working out that they rarely go to museums. If so, they should make a point of taking their child to free cultural events, museums or historical landmarks in their area on a regular basis. Conversely, a history teacher needs to be sure to give her children lots of exposure to music and art. Children are brimming with potential in many different intelligences, and too often they narrow their focus and only want to explore areas in which they are already comfortable. It’s only natural that children will pursue intelligences in which they are raised, but getting them out of their comfort zones – getting them to use and learn in new intelligences – benefits everyone. Who knows, maybe that musical mom has a gardening grace of which she was unaware?</p> <p><strong>Encourage diversity through multiple intelligences. </strong>Most importantly, learning and enjoying a range of intelligences is another form of diversity. It helps to remind us that we are all different and we learn differently, and that’s OK. What counts is that we solve problems, not how they’re solved!</p> <p>Understanding these multiple intelligences and how they contribute to a person’s capabilities can be an essential tool in developing your child’s love of learning and problem-solving abilities. If you can identify your child’s strengths, while also providing him with more ways to learn, you are not only making academics more enjoyable, but you are also arming him with skills that he will need to be successful in school and all of his future endeavors.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=EDC09718-E003-A630-D87B82211234706F">Thomas Hoerr</a> is the head of school at the New City School in St. Louis, MO and author of the book </em><a href="http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/Overview/Becoming-a-Multiple-Intelligences-School.aspx">Becoming A Multiple Intelligences School</a><em>. The New City School faculty has been implementing the theory of multiple intelligences since 1988. If you would like to learn more about MI or want to discuss this topic further with Dr. Hoerr, feel free to reach out to him at </em><em><a href="mailto:trhoerr@newcityschool.org">trhoerr@newcityschool.org</a>.</em></p>
BODYES <p>Todos tenemos algunas habilidades que desarrollamos en forma más natural que otras. Algunos somos mejores para hablar y encontrar la palabra indicada, mientras que otros son geniales resolviendo problemas o interactuando con distintas personas. Con los niños pasa lo mismo. Todos los niños tienen sus puntos fuertes, y utilizando esos puntos puedes ayudar a impulsar un buen desempeño académico. De hecho, existe toda una teoría al respecto llamada "inteligencias múltiples" o IM. El profesor de Harvard, Howard Gardner, introdujo el concepto de inteligencias múltiples en su libro de 1983, "Frames of Mind", donde describió que existen ocho inteligencias vinculadas directamente con la habilidad de una persona de resolver problemas. La idea es que si pudiéramos identificar las fortalezas e inteligencias de nuestros hijos, podríamos aplicar este conocimiento a su aprendizaje y ayudar a maximizar su desempeño académico.</p> <p>El profesor Gardner identificó 8 inteligencias en total, u ocho formas distintas de resolver problemas. Las primeras dos suelen utilizarse en la escuela y son fácilmente identificables para la mayoría de los padres: lingüística (lectura y escritura) y lógico-matemática (matemáticas). Pero existen otras seis áreas en donde podrían residir las fortalezas de tu hijo. Tenemos la inteligencia espacial (utilizada por arquitectos y diseñadores), musical (músicos), corporal-cinestésica (atletas, cirujanos, carpinteros), naturalista (veterinarios, granjeros, campistas), y las dos inteligencias personales: interpersonal e intrapersonal. La inteligencia interpersonal está relacionada con el conocimiento y el entendimiento de otras personas; piensa en aquellas personas que son muy buenas relacionándose con gente desconocida o mediando entre compañeros de trabajo para solucionar un problema. La inteligencia intrapersonal se trata de conocerte y entenderte a ti mismo, lo que puede ayudarte a manejar el estrés y la ira.</p> <p>Hacia donde miremos, podremos observar estas IM. Si nos encontramos con adultos exitosos y felices, veremos que tienen fortalezas en varias inteligencias diferentes; no solo son personas que leen y escriben bien (aunque es posible que lo hagan). Por ejemplo, quienes tienen una marcada inteligencia intrapersonal, encuentran la forma de capitalizar sus puntos fuertes en el aprendizaje, y se colocan en un lugar que les permita lograr sus objetivos. Pueden hacerlo en el trabajo, como parte de su vocación, o puede tratarse de un pasatiempo que les brinda tranquilidad y calma. Las personas que poseen una fuerte inteligencia interpersonal gravitan en campos donde estén rodeados de otras personas.</p> <p>La escuela New City School, que dirijo, comenzó a implementar las IM en 1988. Lo vimos como una forma de ayudar a más estudiantes a aprender y permitirles aprender más; y no nos equivocamos. Los alumnos de nuestra escuela aprenden a leer y a escribir, pero hay más. También aprenden a mostrar lo que saben a través de sus dibujos, creando dioramas y escribiendo poemas. Nuestros estudiantes van al jardín y aprenden matemáticas saltando y bailando. Creemos en un aprendizaje divertido. Los alumnos tienen ganas de ir a la escuela. Las IM nos ayudan a lograrlo. En muchas escuelas hay un camino muy angosto que lleva al éxito; si eres bueno en la lectura y escritura, la escuela te resultará fácil. En una escuela donde se tienen en cuenta las IM, hay muchas formas de aprender. La lectura y la escritura son inteligencias que abarcan habilidades clave, pero también pueden usarse otras inteligencias en el proceso de aprendizaje.</p> <p>Fuera de la escuela, los padres tienen un rol esencial en ayudar para que sus hijos desarrollen inteligencias múltiples y habilidades. Conocer las inteligencias de tu hijo y expandir sus puntos fuertes pueden llevar al éxito académico; y seguramente llevará una mayor felicidad a su vida. Aquí te daré algunas estrategias que puedes usar en tu casa para mejorar la capacidad de aprendizaje de tu hijo, desarrollar habilidades para resolver problemas y destacarse en la escuela y otros ámbitos.</p> <p><strong>Conoce las cualidades relacionadas con las distintas inteligencias.</strong> En su libro, Gardner asegura que hay ocho inteligencias y ocho formas de resolver problemas. Saber cuáles son es un buen comienzo para desarrollar las IM de tu hijo. El blog Connections Academy hace un trabajo maravilloso al dividir las inteligencias de una forma visual:</p> <p><strong>Identifica tus propias fortalezas.</strong> Mira el gráfico de IM e identifica tus 2-3 inteligencias más fuertes y las más débiles. Edutopia también tiene un cuestionario de IM que puede darte nuevos conocimientos de tus preferencias de aprendizaje. ¿Qué inteligencias están más presentes en tu casa y cómo pasas tu tiempo libre? Es probable que pases la mayor parte del tiempo utilizando tus inteligencias más fuertes, y evites aquellas áreas donde la inteligencia no es tan marcada. Es la naturaleza humana. (¡Yo sé que hago eso!).</p> <p>En la mayoría de los hogares, los niños buscan y desarrollan naturalmente las inteligencias en las que sus padres son más fuertes; los niños observan, escuchan e imitan. Un niño que crece en una casa con mucha música aprenderá a apreciarla desde muy pequeño y es probable que disfrute y aprenda a tocar música cuando sea grande. Del mismo modo, un niño cuyos padres son pintores o escultores se sentirá más cómodo jugando con colores y con arcilla desde pequeño. Sin embargo, te sugiero que observes tu propio perfil de IM y que lo dejes a un lado cuando piensas en las experiencias que deseas para tu hijo.</p> <p><strong>Usa un aprendizaje práctico.</strong> Tu hijo se verá beneficiado si le das la oportunidad de expandirse más allá de sus propias fortalezas en casa. Puedes probar estas estrategias si quieres que desarrolle habilidades en otras inteligencias. Por ejemplo:</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- Para esos niños que tienen una <strong>inteligencia lingüística</strong>, <strong>o tienen facilidad con las palabras</strong>, puedes armar un espacio de lectura o una biblioteca para que tengan un lugar donde aislarse y concentrarse en sus libros. O para niños más pequeños, elige un momento para leer juntos, y pídele a tu hijo que invente otro final para la historia.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- Para los que tienen una<strong> inteligencia lógico-matemática</strong>, puedes darles muchos rompecabezas apropiados según la edad o juegos de bloques para armar. También puedes ver el pronóstico del tiempo con tu hijo y conversar sobre la ciencia y matemática que se esconden detrás del pronóstico.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- Para los niños que tienen una i<strong>nclinación por la música</strong>, o <strong>una inteligencia musical</strong>, inscríbelos en una clase de música o dales instrumentos para tocar (¡cualquier olla o sartén puede usarse como batería!). También puedes proponer juegos donde los integrantes de la familia puedan inventar la letra de una misma canción todos juntos.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- Para quienes tienen facilidad para aprender mediante lo <strong>visual/espacial</strong>, <strong>o niños con inteligencia fotográfica</strong>, es necesario que cuentes con pastas para modelar Play-Doh, pinturas, colores o recortes de revistas. También le puedes pedir a tu hijo que use multimedia para crear una tarjeta o un collage para otros integrantes de la familia.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- Para los que tienen una<strong> inteligencia corporal-cinestésica</strong>, prueba con videojuegos donde toda la familia participe y baile, organiza una carrera de relevos en el jardín o hazlo participar en un proyecto de remodelación de tu hogar.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- <strong>Si tu hijo tiene una inteligencia naturalista o es amante de la naturaleza</strong>, un jardín será una actividad perfecta de aprendizaje. Podría ser un pequeño jardín con hierbas en la repisa de la ventana, un jardín más grande de vegetales en el patio o podrían unirse a un jardín comunitario y participar juntos.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- Si <strong>la inteligencia es interpersonal</strong>, intenta cocinar y trabajar en una receta juntos, donde tengas que usar tus habilidades de equipo para completar este sabroso proyecto. También pueden ofrecerse como voluntarios en un banco local de alimentos.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">- Para los que poseen una inteligencia intrapersonal, es bueno incentivarlos para que lleven un diario personal donde escriban sus pensamientos con regularidad, o invítalos a abrir un blog en línea.</p> <p><strong>Expón a tu hijo a "otras" inteligencias.</strong> Es muy beneficioso que los padres les brinden en forma consciente a sus hijos experiencias en "otras" inteligencias, de esas que muy posiblemente no sean parte del hogar. Una mamá que sale a correr o un papá que juega al básquetbol, ambos inmersos en la inteligencia corporal-cinestésica, pasan tanto tiempo entrenando que es probable que no visiten museos. Si lo hacen, deberían llevar a sus hijos a eventos culturales gratuitos, museos o sitios históricos de su zona en forma regular. Por el contrario, una profesora de historia debe asegurarse de poner en contacto a sus hijos con la música y el arte. Los niños están llenos de potencial en muchas inteligencias diferentes, y muchas veces su atención se encuentra acotada y solo quieren explorar áreas en las que ya se sienten cómodos. Es natural que los niños sigan las inteligencias en las que fueron criados, pero sacarlos de sus zonas de confort, estimularlos a usar y aprender nuevas inteligencias, beneficia a todos. ¿Quién sabe? Quizá esa mamá musical tiene un don en la jardinería que ni ella sabía.</p> <p><strong>Incentiva la diversidad a través de múltiples inteligencias.</strong> Aprender y disfrutar una gama de inteligencias es otra forma de diversidad. Nos recuerda que todos somos diferentes y que aprendemos diferente, y eso está BIEN. ¡Lo importante es que resolvemos problemas, no cómo lo hacemos!</p> <p>Entender estas múltiples inteligencias y saber cómo contribuyen con las capacidades de una persona puede ser una herramienta esencial en el desarrollo del amor de tu hijo por el aprendizaje y las habilidades para resolver problemas. Si puedes identificar las fortalezas de tu hijo y, al mismo tiempo, brindarle más formas de aprender, no solo permites que disfrute más de lo académico, sino que también le provees de habilidades que necesitará para ser exitoso en la escuela y en todos sus futuros proyectos.</p> <p><em>Thomas Hoerr es director de New City School en St. Louis, MO, y autor del libro Becoming A Multiple Intelligences School. Los docentes de New City School han estado implementando la teoría de inteligencias múltiples desde 1988. Si deseas aprender más sobre IM o quieres debatir sobre este tema con el Dr. Hoerr, no dudes en contactarlo escribiéndole a trhoerr@newcityschool.org.</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:28:27.907
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:09:52.98
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL How to Boost Learning: Tap into Your Child’s Natural Strengths
LASTUPDATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID CB754E20-070D-11E5-959C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC --
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2015-06-15 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Understanding children’s natural strengths and problem solving abilities, which means recognizing their multiple intelligence or MI, can be the key to boosting their overall success.
TEASERES Todos tenemos algunas habilidades que desarrollamos en forma más natural que otras.
TEASERIMAGE 139D1A30-208D-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
TITLE How to Boost Learning: Tap into Your Child’s Natural Strengths
TITLEES Cómo impulsar el aprendizaje: conoce los talentos naturales de tu hijo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09718-E003-A630-D87B82211234706F

Group Of Happy Kids

Debunking the Belief That All Children Are the Same

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2bue0jL
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Do you ever look at children who are the same age as your child and wonder why your little one hasn’t learned to talk/walk/read/dance/tumble/hit a ball as well or as soon as they have? Or maybe you’ve wondered why your second child isn’t progressing at the same rate as your first one did.</p> <p>It’s an all-too-familiar scenario among parents, particularly these days, when life can feel like one big competition. It seems there’s always someone boasting about how “advanced” their child is, or asking at what age your child accomplished a significant milestone. The pressure can be overwhelming. And since there’s no one easier to scare than a parent, you don’t just wonder, you <em>worry</em> – because the idea that your child might fall behind is terrifying.</p> <p><strong>RELATED: <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=269FB610-3A29-11E6-AEE40050569A5318">“Debunking the Myth That Earlier Is Better”</a></strong></p> <p>The worry is especially persistent when it comes to your child’s schooling. It takes only one report card or parent/teacher conference to make you feel unsettled. Why aren’t your daughter’s grades better than her best friend’s? Why is your son less adept at sitting still than his brother was? Why doesn’t your child seem to be as popular as the kid next door?</p> <p>What you need to know is that, despite the fact that we in this country boast about our individuality and creativity, our schools seem determined to place greater emphasis on conformity. For the most part, that’s always been the case in our education system -- expecting all children in the same grade to master the same work at the same level and pace. But since the inception of No Child Left Behind – and now with Race to the Top and the implementation of the Common Core Standards – I believe it’s only gotten worse. The notion of education as a competition has become increasingly predominant and that creative “box” everyone is always talking about has become increasingly smaller.</p> <p>There’s nothing wrong with standards, or goals, per se. It makes sense to establish a certain level of mastery for children to achieve and to determine what students should be able to do and know over the course of a particular period of time – a school year, for example. But the standards should be realistic. It should be possible for the majority of students to achieve them, each at her or his own pace. That means the standards need to be developmentally appropriate and based on the principles of child development – designed with actual children, who differ greatly from one another, in mind.</p> <p>But I agree with some educators who say they're not. The K-3 standards, for example, <a href="https://flowersforsocrates.com/2015/05/15/developmentally-inappropriate-how-common-core-jeopardizes-the-foundation-of-learning-and-may-harm-some-children-video/">were written by people with little to no knowledge of child development or developmentally appropriate practice</a>. They were written with too little input from people who do have that knowledge, such as teachers and child development experts. In fact, of the 135 people on the committees that wrote and reviewed the K-3 Common Core Standards, <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2013/01/29/a-tough-critique-of-common-core-on-early-childhood-education/">not one was a K-3 teacher or an early childhood professional</a>. Despite that, teachers, who are more and more often being <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2014/03/23/kindergarten-teacher-my-job-is-now-about-tests-and-data-not-children-i-quit/">asked to teach in ways they know to be developmentally inappropriate</a>, are required to adhere to these standards. But if your child isn’t meeting all of them, I don’t believe you should be worried.</p> <p>Educator Justin Tarte has been <a href="http://www.bamradionetwork.com/quoted/viewquote/4483-asking-all-6th-grade-kids-to-master-the-same-concept-at-the-same-time-is-like-asking-all-35-year-olds-to-wear-the-same-size-shirt">quoted</a> as saying, “Asking all 6th-grade kids to master the same concept at the same time is like asking all 35-year-olds to wear the same size shirt.” That sentiment applies for children of every age. </p> <p>Similarly, in an <a href="http://www.bamradionetwork.com/educators-channel/161-how-to-help-children-learn-to-read-well">interview on BAM Radio Network</a>, noted early childhood expert Jane Healy said, “We have a tendency in this country to put everybody into a formula – to throw them all into the same box and have these expectations that they’re all going to do the same thing at the same time.” But that’s as unrealistic an expectation as you can get. We only have to consider the myriad possibilities for genetic combinations, along with various environmental factors, to realize that we can’t begin to envision the diversity in temperament, intellect, skills, and learning styles among a group of 30 children in the same classroom.</p> <p>The study of child development informs us that:</p> <p>- It’s simply not possible for all children to do and know the exact same things at the exact same age.<br />- All children go through the same stages in the same order but they do it at varying rates.<br />- Each domain – cognitive, physical, emotional, social – has its own rate of development.</p> <p>The latter means that your child may be better at sharing (social development) than another but may have less advanced motor skills (physical). Your first child may have spoken at an earlier age than your second (cognitive), but your second child may be less prone to temper tantrums (emotional).</p> <p>If we accept that no two snowflakes are alike, why wouldn’t we accept that no two individuals – even of the same age and gender – are alike? It’s just plain common sense.</p> <p>One of my favorite lines from an <a href="http://www.bamradionetwork.com/parents-channel/131-giving-your-child-the-very-best-head-start">interview with noted educator David Elkind</a> was, “Wrong ideas always seem to catch on more easily than right ones.” The idea that all children are the same is definitely a wrong idea.</p> <h4>What’s a Parent to Do? My advice:</h4> <p>- Avoid comparisons, whether it’s with children outside or within your family (especially aloud, within earshot of your kids). No two children – not siblings, nor even twins – are going to be exactly alike.</p> <p>- Refrain from engaging in conversations with other parents when the topic involves making comparisons. No good can come from such conversations – for you <em>or</em> your child.</p> <p>- Remember that we all have strengths and weaknesses and that applies to children as well. Help your child to understand this important life lesson.</p> <p>- Keep in mind that the idea of all children as “above average” (what’s known as the “<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Wobegon">Lake Wobegon Effect</a>”) is not only mathematically impossible; also, it puts a great deal of pressure on children. They want nothing more than to please the important adults in their lives and if those adults are fond of such labels as “advanced,” “gifted,” or “above average,” they will strive to be those things – even in areas where it’s simply not possible for them to do so. Childhood should be a time of trial and error, not a time to reach for impossible standards.</p> <p>- If your child’s “weaknesses” dominate a report card or parent/teacher conference, make a point of asking what your child does well. Don’t let negativity rule the day.</p> <p>- Understand that our schools give lip service to individuality and creativity but tend to reward conformity. Take pride in your child’s differences and help him or her to take pride in them as well. Steve Jobs and Oprah Winfrey didn’t achieve such heights by being conformists.</p> <p><em>Rae Pica has brought her messages about the development and education of the whole child to parents and educators throughout North America. Her latest book is</em><em> </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1483381846/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1483381846&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=movinlearn-20&amp;linkId=VJYREHYHMHUFALUM" target="_blank">What If Everybody Understood Child Development?: Straight Talk About Bettering Education and Children’s Lives</a><em>. You can learn more about her at</em><em> </em><a href="http://www.raepica.com/" target="_blank"><em>www.raepica.com</em></a><em> </em><em>and follow her at </em><a href="https://twitter.com/raepica1" target="_blank"><em>@raepica1</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><strong>Follow the Parent Toolkit on <a href="http://bit.ly/2bQX6cp" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/educationnation" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="https://www.instagram.com/theparenttoolkit/" target="_blank">Instagram</a>.</strong></p>
BODYES <p><em>Rae Pica, Consultora en educación</em></p> <p>¿Te ha sucedido que ves a otros niños de la misma edad de tu hijo y te preguntas por qué tu pequeño todavía no ha aprendido a hablar/caminar/leer/bailar/dar volteretas/patear un balón o no lo hace tan bien como ellos? O tal vez te preguntas por qué tu segundo hijo no progresa al mismo ritmo que lo hizo el primero.</p> <p>Estos sentimientos son muy frecuentes entre los padres, especialmente en estos días donde la vida puede parecer una gran competencia. Siempre hay alguien haciendo alarde de lo “avanzado” que es su hijo, o que pregunta a qué edad tu hijo alcanzó tal o cual hito del desarrollo, y la presión puede ser apabullante. Y como los padres son muy asustadizos, no solo te haces preguntas, también te preocupas porque te aterra la idea de que tu hijo quede rezagado.</p> <p>Y la preocupación es más persistente cuando se trata de la escolaridad. Ya con solo recibir la libreta de calificaciones o una reunión de padres y maestros te hace sentir intranquilo. ¿Por qué las calificaciones de tu hija no son mejores que las de su mejor amiga? ¿Por qué a tu hijo le cuesta tanto quedarse quieto a diferencia de su hermano mayor?  ¿Por qué tu hijo no es tan popular como el hijo del vecino?</p> <p>Lo que debes saber es que, a pesar de que en nuestro país nos gusta hacer alarde de nuestra individualidad y creatividad, las escuelas parecen estar decididas a enfatizar la conformidad. Y este ha sido siempre el caso en nuestro sistema educativo: esperar que todos los niños del grado dominen la misma tarea al mismo nivel y al mismo ritmo. Pero desde la concepción de la ley No Child Left Behind (Que Ningún Niño se Quede Atrás), y ahora con Race to the Top y la implementación de los Common Core Standards (Estándares Comunes), creo que la situación ha empeorado. La noción de que la educación es una competencia predomina cada vez más,  y la “caja” creativa de la que todos hablan es cada vez más pequeña.</p> <p>Los estándares o los objetivos no tienen nada de malo en sí mismos. Es lógico establecer un cierto nivel de dominio que los niños deben alcanzar y determinar qué cosas deben saber y ser capaces de hacer los estudiantes durante el curso de un período específico de tiempo, por ejemplo, un año escolar. Pero los estándares deben ser realistas. Los estudiantes deberían poder alcanzar los objetivos cada uno a su propio ritmo. Esto significa que los estándares deben ser adecuados en términos de desarrollo y estar basados en los principios del desarrollo de los niños, es decir, pensando en niños reales, que son muy distintos entre si.</p> <p>Pero concuerdo con algunos educadores que plantean que esto no es así. Por ejemplo, los estándares para K-3 fueron desarrollados por personas con escasos o nulos conocimientos sobre el desarrollo infantil o prácticas adecuadas para el desarrollo. Fueron redactados sin consultar con los profesionales que sí poseen esos conocimientos, tales como maestros o expertos en desarrollo infantil. De hecho, de las 135 personas que formaron parte de los comités que redactaron y revisaron los Estándares Comunes para K3, ninguna de ellas era docente de K-3 o experto en primera infancia. A pesar de esto, a los maestros con cada vez más frecuencia se les pide que usen métodos de enseñanza que saben que son inadecuados a nivel de desarrollo, y además deben ceñirse a estos estándares. Pero si tu hijo no cumple con todos ellos creo que no debes preocuparte.</p> <p>El educador Justin Tarte explica que  “pedirle a todos los niños de 6.º grado que dominen el mismo concepto al mismo tiempo es como pedirle a todos los adultos de 35 años que usen la misma talla de camisa”.  Y esta premisa se aplica a los niños de todas las edades.</p> <p>De manera similar, durante una entrevista en BAM Radio Network, la reconocida experta en infancia temprana Jane Healy dijo: “En este país tenemos una tendencia a encuadrar a todos en una misma fórmula, los metemos en la misma caja y tenemos la expectativa de que todos harán lo mismo al mismo tiempo”. Pero esto es una expectativa absolutamente irreal. Solo tenemos que considerar las infinitas posibilidades de combinaciones genéticas y variados factores ambientales para darnos cuenta de que no podemos imaginar siquiera la diversidad de temperamentos, inteligencia, habilidades y estilos de aprendizaje en un grupo de 30 niños que comparten el mismo salón de clases.</p> <p>Los estudios sobre desarrollo infantil demuestran que:</p> <p>- No es posible que todos los niños hagan y sepan exactamente las mismas cosas a la misma edad.</p> <p>- Todos los niños atraviesan las mismas etapas y en el mismo orden, pero cada uno tiene un ritmo diferente.</p> <p>- Cada área de dominio (cognitivo, físico, emocional, social) tiene su propio grado de desarrollo.</p> <p>Esto último significa que tu hijo puede ser mejor que otro niño al momento de compartir (desarrollo social), pero sus habilidades motoras avanzadas pueden ser menores (desarrollo físico). Tu primer hijo puede haber empezado a hablar a una edad más temprana que tu segundo hijo (desarrollo cognitivo), pero tu segundo hijo tal vez tenga menos predisposición a tener rabietas (desarrollo emocional).</p> <p>Si aceptamos que no hay dos copos de nieve idénticos, ¿por qué no podemos aceptar que no hay dos personas iguales, aunque que tengan la misma edad y sean del mismo género? Es puro sentido común.</p> <p>Una de mis frases favoritas de una entrevista que hicieron al reconocido educador David Elkind dice: “Las ideas incorrectas siempre se ponen de moda mucho más fácil que las correctas”. La idea de que todos los niños son iguales es, definitivamente, una idea incorrecta.</p> <h4><em>¿Qué deben hacer los padres?  Mi consejo:</em></h4> <p>- Evita las comparaciones, no importa que sea con niños ajenos o de la familia, especialmente si las haces en voz alta o al alcance del oído de tus hijos.  Ningún niño será exactamente igual a otro, ni entre hermanos y ni siquiera entre gemelos.</p> <p>- Evita participar en conversaciones con otros padres cuando el tema de la charla incluya hacer comparaciones. Nada bueno saldrá de estas conversaciones, ni para ti ni para tu hijo.</p> <p>- Recuerda que todos tenemos fortalezas y debilidades, y esto también es válido para los niños. Ayuda a tus hijos a aprender esta importante lección de vida.</p> <p>- Ten presente que la idea de que todos los niños sean “superiores al promedio” (también conocido como Efecto Dunning-Kruger) no solo es matemáticamente imposible, sino que también impone una gran presión en los niños. Lo que más quieren es complacer a los adultos importantes en sus vidas y si esos adultos son partidarios del uso de etiquetas tales como “avanzado”, “dotado” o “superior al promedio”, los niños se esforzarán por ser así, incluso en áreas donde no es posible para ellos hacerlo. La infancia debería ser una etapa de ensayo y error, no una ocasión para alcanzar estándares imposibles.</p> <p>- Si las “debilidades” de tu hijo predominan en la libreta de calificaciones o en la reunión de padres y maestros, pregunta qué cosas hace bien. No permitas que la negatividad rija tu día.</p> <p>- Ten presente que, de la boca para afuera, las escuelas hablan de la individualidad y la creatividad pero tienden a recompensar la conformidad. Siéntete orgulloso de las diferencias de tu hijo o hija y ayúdalos a que también se sientan orgullosos por eso. Steve Jobs y Oprah Winfrey no llegaron adonde están por ser conformistas.</p> <p><em>Rae Pica lleva mensajes sobre el desarrollo y la educación del niño a padres y educadores en toda América del Norte. </em><em>Su último libro es What If Everybody Understood Child Development?: Straight Talk About Bettering Education and Children’s Lives. Puedes obtener más información sobre ella en www.raepica.com y puedes seguirla en @raepica1.</em></p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,03C29AC8-5056-9A4B-6C6F182736A99C25,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:27.34
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:37:11.997
DESCRIPTION Worried that your child hasn't hasn’t learned to talk, walk, or read as well as other kids their age? Focus on celebrating their individuality instead.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this Parent Toolkit article on how parents and educators can prioritize individuality, rather than conformity, when raising and teaching children.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Parents and educators should remember that no child is created equal when measuring development or academic performance. Here's how to embrace individuality.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Debunking the Belief That All Children Are the Same
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 20D26F50-5E52-11E6-BB590050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC 03C29AC8-5056-9A4B-6C6F182736A99C25
PUBLISHDATE 2016-08-15 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE All Children Are Not the Same - And that's Okay
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES ¿Te ha sucedido que ves a otros niños de la misma edad de tu hijo y te preguntas por qué tu pequeño todavía no ha aprendido a hablar/caminar/leer/bailar/dar volteretas/patear un balón o no lo hace tan bien como ellos?
SHORTTITLE Debunking the Belief That All Children Are the Same
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE All Children Are Not the Same - And that's Okay
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Parents often worry if their kid is at the level they should be in school, health, life...but what if we told you that “standard” really varies?
TEASERES ¿Te ha sucedido que ves a otros niños de la misma edad de tu hijo y te preguntas por qué tu pequeño todavía no ha aprendido a hablar/caminar/leer/bailar/dar volteretas/patear un balón o no lo hace tan bien como ellos?
TEASERIMAGE 70128840-1AF2-11E7-BF710050569A4B6C
TITLE Debunking the Belief That All Children Are the Same
TITLEES Derribar el mito de que todos los niños son iguales
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Parents and educators should embrace children's individuality, rather than forcing them into a one-size-fits-all box:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 FC1FB5B0-BB16-11E6-89870050569A5318

Math girl

To Master Basic Math Facts: Strategize, Then Memorize

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1gf1ixn
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Nothing may be more feared in the minds of young children and their parents than learning the basic math facts. Just hearing the times tables takes many of us back to our own childhoods, staring at a blank page and trying to remember the dreaded 9 x 8 = 72. The good news is that our own children should not have to suffer the same fear. A substantial amount of mathematics education research shows that children do not master their math facts through memorization alone. Instead, true mastery comes from being equipped with quick and effective strategies for finding the solution. By using these strategies, children will always have the mental tools needed to find the correct answer and the confidence to use them.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=67061440-9D6B-11E3-857E0050569A5318"><em>RELATED: Grade-by-Grade Academic Growth Charts</em></a></p> <p>With a strategy-based approach to the basic math facts, children use what they already know to figure out what they don’t know. Rather than racking their brains to remember the answer to a basic math fact, they can simply find a “helping” fact and use it as a jumping- off point. For example, let’s say that your child knows the common fact 5 x 5 = 25. She can then add one more 5 to figure out that 6 x 5 = 30. Think of this as the “one more than” strategy. There are many such strategies that parents can teach their children in order to equip them with the tools they need to master all of their math facts. As a parent, remember that as long as your child can figure out an answer quickly in her head (in about 3 seconds or less), she has mastered the fact and can use it in meaningful ways as part of her daily life.</p> <p>Some of the most common strategies for basic fact mastery include:</p> <p><strong>1.</strong> <strong>Skip Counting</strong> – Perhaps the simplest strategy that children can begin learning at an early age is skip counting, that is, counting by 2s, 5s, 10s, etc. Skip counting is fun to do and children begin to hear patterns in numbers. When paired with a chart (such as Figure 1), they can even begin to see those patterns. For instance, when skip counting by 10s, see if your child notices the pattern that all the numbers end in zero!</p> <p><img src="/images/dmImage/SourceImage/MathBlog-Figure1.jpg" border="0" hspace="5" width="100%" /></p> <p><strong>2.</strong> <strong>Make 10</strong> – A useful way for children to think about numbers is in relationship to 10, which can serve as a mental anchor for them. For instance, when children are learning the math fact 14 – 6 = 8, they don’t need to subtract 6 all at once. Instead, they can first take away 4 from 14 to make 10 and then take away 2 more from 10 to equal 8.</p> <p><strong>3.</strong> <strong>Doubles and Near Doubles</strong> – Many children are already familiar with doubles facts. They know that 3 + 3 = 6, for instance. They can draw upon their knowledge of doubles and simply count one more to figure out near doubles such as 3 + 4 = 7 (illustrated in Figure 2).</p> <p><img src="/images/dmImage/SourceImage/MathBlog-Figure2.jpg" border="0" hspace="5" width="100%" /></p> <p><strong>4. Nines</strong> – Multiplying by 10 is often clear even for young children. Because nine is so close to 10, 9 facts are fairly straightforward to work out mentally. For instance, if a child knows that 10 x 7 = 70, they can take away one 7 to figure out that 9 x 7 = 63. Nines also have lots of patterns to explore together.</p> <p><strong>5.</strong> <strong>Commutative Property</strong> – This is the mathematical way to say, “you can add or multiply numbers in any order and you get the same answer.” Based on this property, if your child knows 3 + 2 = 5, then he can solve 2 + 3 = 5 (illustrated in Figure 3). Taking this approach cuts the number of addition and multiplication facts in half!</p> <p><img src="/images/dmImage/SourceImage/MathBlog-Figure3.png" border="0" hspace="5" width="100%" /></p> <p><strong>6.</strong> <strong>Use Fact Families</strong> – Children know that addition facts are connected to subtraction facts, and multiplication facts are to division facts. Therefore, it is helpful if they learn their basic facts as part of “fact families.” For instance, an addition and subtraction fact family might include 7 + 8 = 15 as well as 15 – 8 = 7. Using this approach, again, cuts the number of math facts in half.</p> <p><strong>7. Make it Real</strong> – Finally, don’t limit your practice of basic math facts to traditional flashcards. Instead, play math games and point out math relationships in real life. For instance, while your child is racing toy cars, you might show him that each car has 4 tires and ask how he could quickly figure out how many tires are on all 6 cars without counting each one. Then, ask him how he came to his solution and make math something that you talk about together every day.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/185479537?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="460" height="258.75" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p><strong>Follow Parent Toolkit on <a href="https://twitter.com/educationnation">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ParentToolkit/">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://www.instagram.com/theparenttoolkit/">Instagram</a>.</strong></p>
BODYES <p>Nada provoca más miedo en los niños y en sus padres que aprender las operaciones matemáticas básicas. El solo hecho de que nos hablen de tablas nos transporta a nuestra propia niñez, mirando fijo una hoja en blanco e intentando recordar el temido 9 x 8 = 72. La buena noticia es que nuestros hijos no tendrán que padecer el mismo miedo. Una gran cantidad de estudios sobre Matemática demuestra que los niños no dominan las operaciones matemáticas solo memorizándolas. En realidad, el verdadero dominio viene de tener estrategias rápidas y efectivas para encontrar la solución. Al usar estas estrategias, los niños siempre contarán con las herramientas mentales que necesitan para encontrar la respuesta correcta y la confianza para usarlas.</p> <p>Con un enfoque basado en estrategias, los niños recurren a lo que ya saben para llegar a lo que desconocen. En lugar de exprimir sus cerebros para recordar la respuesta de una operación matemática, simplemente pueden encontrar una operación “de ayuda” y usarla como punto de partida. Por ejemplo, supongamos que tu hijo sabe que 5 x 5 es 25. Puede sumarle 5 para deducir que 6 x 5 = 30. Esta sería la estrategia “si le sumo”. Existen muchas estrategias que los padres les pueden enseñar a sus hijos para equiparlos con las herramientas que necesitan para dominar todas las operaciones matemáticas. Como padre, recuerda que siempre que tu hijo pueda deducir una respuesta rápidamente (en 3 segundos o menos), ha logrado dominar la operación y puede usarla en su vida diaria.</p> <p>Algunas de las estrategias más frecuentes para dominar las operaciones básicas:</p> <p><strong>1. Contar saltando números</strong> – Quizá la estrategia más sencilla que los más pequeños pueden aprender es saltar números al contar, ya sea de dos en dos o de a 5, de a 10, etc. Es muy divertido y los niños comienzan a registrar patrones en los números. Cuando analizan un cuadro (como el gráfico 1), pueden identificar esos patrones. Por ejemplo, cuando cuenta de a 10, fíjate si tu hijo reconoce el patrón que todos los números terminan en cero.</p> <p><strong>2. Convertirlo en 10</strong> – Una forma útil para que los niños operen con números es en relación al 10, que puede servir como un punto de referencia mental. Por ejemplo, cuando los niños están aprendiendo la operación 14 – 6 = 8, no es necesario que resten 6 de inmediato. Primero, pueden sacarle 4 a 14 para convertirlo en 10 y luego restarle 2 más para llegar a 8.</p> <p><strong>3. Dobles y dobles cercanos</strong> – Muchos niños ya están familiarizados con las operaciones de duplicar. Saben que 3 + 3 = 6, por ejemplo. Pueden partir de su conocimiento de los dobles y simplemente contar uno más para calcular los dobles cercanos como 3 + 4 = 7 (ilustrado en el gráfico 2).</p> <p><strong>4. Nueve</strong> – Multiplicar por 10 suele ser bastante sencillo hasta para los más pequeños. Como el nueve está tan cerca del diez, las operaciones con 9 pueden resolverse mentalmente. Por ejemplo, si un niño sabe que 10 x 7 = 70, puede restarle 7 para deducir que 9 x 7 = 63. El nueve también tiene muchos patrones para explorar juntos.</p> <p><strong>5. Propiedad conmutativa</strong> – Esta es la forma matemática de decir: “puedes sumar o multiplicar números en cualquier orden y el resultado será el mismo”. A partir de esta propiedad, si tu hijo sabe que 3 + 2 = 5, podrá resolver 2 + 3 = 5 (ilustrado en el gráfico 3). Al saber esto, ¡la cantidad de operaciones de suma y multiplicación se reduce a la mitad!</p> <p><strong>6. Usar las familias de operaciones</strong> – Los niños saben que las operaciones de suma están conectadas con las de resta, y las multiplicaciones con las divisiones. Por lo tanto, si aprenden las operaciones básicas como parte de una “familia de operaciones” les resultará muy útil. Por ejemplo, una familia de operaciones de suma y resta podría incluir 7 + 8 = 15 y 15 – 8 = 7. Una vez más, al usar este método, la cantidad de operaciones matemáticas se reduce a la mitad.</p> <p><strong>7. Llevarlo a la vida real</strong> – Por último, no limites la práctica de operaciones matemáticas básicas a las fichas tradicionales. En su lugar, invítalo a jugar y señala las relaciones matemáticas en la vida real. Por ejemplo, mientras tu hijo arma una carrera con sus autitos de juguete, puedes mostrarle que cada auto tiene 4 neumáticos y preguntarle si puede calcular rápidamente cuántos neumáticos hay en los 6 autos sin que los cuente uno por uno. Luego, pregúntale cómo llegó al resultado, y aplica las operaciones matemáticas en sus conversaciones diarias.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4,F45FAA2F-5056-9A4B-6CEE346B20D7951A,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:05:23.86
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 15:53:26.16
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL To Master Basic Math Facts: Strategize, Then Memorize
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 723B3800-98AB-11E3-88950050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F45FAA2F-5056-9A4B-6CEE346B20D7951A
PTOPIC F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
PUBLISHDATE 2014-02-18 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Nothing may be more feared in the minds of young children and their parents than learning the basic math facts. Just hearing the times tables takes many of us back to our own childhoods. The good news is that our own children should not have to suffer the same fear.
TEASERES Nada provoca más miedo en los niños y en sus padres que aprender las operaciones matemáticas básicas.
TEASERIMAGE 11041A60-213E-11E7-B3920050569A4B6C
TITLE To Master Basic Math Facts: Strategize, Then Memorize
TITLEES Dominar las operaciones matemáticas básicas: primero la estrategia, luego la memoria
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 3848DED0-4AE7-11E7-BAFD0050569A4B6C
expertObj
array
1 6E80F850-2A90-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Social and Emotional Development

Research shows that those with higher social-emotional skills have better attention skills and fewer learning problems, and are generally more successful in academic and workplace settings. Like any math or English, these skills can be taught and grow over time.

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is knowing your emotions, strengths and challenges, and how your emotions affect your behavior and decisions.

Self-Management

Self-management is controlling emotions and the behaviors they spark in order to overcome challenges and pursue goals.

Social Awareness

Social awareness is understanding and respecting the perspectives of others, and applying this knowledge to social interactions with people from diverse backgrounds.

Relationships

The ability to interact meaningfully with others and to maintain healthy relationships with diverse individuals and groups contributes to overall success.

Responsible Decision-Making

Responsible decision-making is the ability to make choices that are good for you and for others. It is also taking into account your wishes and the wishes of others.

Recommended

Music class

Creating Harmony: How Music Can Support Social Emotional Development

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1NGYMCY
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Making music with your child can be so much fun for both of you, whether you’re singing along to the radio in the car, jamming on plastic bowl “drums,” or dancing to songs on your iPod.  Plus, music-making helps your child’s development in many important ways. The best part? You don’t have to have a great singing voice or play a musical instrument to have an impact. The simple and enjoyable act of making music with your child naturally fosters important social and emotional skills, such as self-regulation, self-confidence, leadership skills, social skills, and socio-emotional intelligence.</p> <p>In fact, <a href="http://www.psmag.com/news/do-re-mi-promotes-a-feeling-of-we-19058/">recent research</a><a href="file:///C:/Users/206466109/Documents/PT%20-%20Blogs/Lauren%20Guilmartin/Music%20Early%20SEL%20Development/Guilmartin_Music&amp;SEL_SorayaReview.docx#_edn1">[i]</a> has found that preschoolers who engaged in participatory group music and movement activities showed greater group cohesion, cooperation, and prosocial behavior when compared to children who did not engage in the same music activities. Singing and dancing <em>together</em> led to increased empathy (the ability to understand and even share in the feelings of others) for the children with whom they were making music. <a href="http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120509123653.htm">Even in infancy</a>,<a href="file:///C:/Users/206466109/Documents/PT%20-%20Blogs/Lauren%20Guilmartin/Music%20Early%20SEL%20Development/Guilmartin_Music&amp;SEL_SorayaReview.docx#_edn2">[ii]</a> adult-child music and movement interactions can lead to better communication and increased emotional and social coordination and connection, both rhythmically and emotionally, between the adult and the child. Researchers propose this might support infants’ earliest abilities to engage in positive social interactions with others.</p> <p>So, you can have fun making music with your whole family and know that you are also supporting your child’s social and emotional growth. Here are some ideas for music activities you can try at home to specifically support several areas of socio-emotional learning.</p> <h4>Self-control and Self-regulation</h4> <p>Singing a song like “BINGO,” where you are challenged to incrementally leave out a phrase in the song, is a fun way for children to practice the crucial skill of <a href="http://bit.ly/10OIKTs">impulse control</a> in daily life. You can try this technique with <em>any song</em> you and your children know. As you sing a familiar tune, ask your child to leave out one of the words in the next lyric/phrase. During this game, children exercise self-control and self-regulation and experience what it feels like to resist doing something. It’s the same concept at work in the popular backyard game “Red Light, Green Light!”</p> <h4>Self-confidence and Leadership Skills</h4> <p>Ask your child to lead YOU in a favorite song, maybe one she learned at school. Just follow your child’s lead whether she gets the lyrics or melody “right” or not. This simple activity gives her a chance to be the leader—and supports her self-confidence as she experiences that her way of interpreting the song is accepted and embraced by you. Similarly, songs that ask children to come up with their own word or sound also support self-confidence and leadership skills. For example, in “Old MacDonald Had a Farm,” children can choose an animal to sing about and imitate its sound in their own way.</p> <h4>Social Skills and Socio-emotional Intelligence</h4> <p>Whether making music with just you or with the whole family, group music-making challenges children to work with others as an “ensemble.” They learn the importance of respecting others’ space and how they express themselves. They also get to practice working together towards a common goal (e.g., when holding hands while dancing). Respect, collaboration, and working as a team are all important social skills for your child to develop.</p> <h4>Empathy Development</h4> <p>Making music in a group also challenges children to watch the people around them for subtle cues to timing, volume, and expressiveness—the same cues that we use for reading expressions and moods on people’s faces. Being able to perceive and understand people’s feelings is a basis for empathy and moral development.  </p> <p>Actively making music with your child is a fun and easy way to support your child's socio-emotional learning, helping them to develop self-regulation, self-confidence, leadership skills, social skills, and much more! So, the next time you sing with your child, try some of the activities suggested here. And remember, it doesn’t matter whether you consider yourself “musical.” Your joyful participation and enjoyment is what is most important! </p> <div><hr size="1" /> <div> <p><a href="file:///C:/Users/206466109/Documents/PT%20-%20Blogs/Lauren%20Guilmartin/Music%20Early%20SEL%20Development/Guilmartin_Music&amp;SEL_SorayaReview.docx#_ednref1">[i]</a> Kirschner, S. &amp; Tomasello, M. (2010). Joint music-making promotes prosocial behavior in 4-year-old children. <em>Evolution and Human Behavior</em>, <em>31</em>, 354-364.</p> </div> <div> <p><a href="file:///C:/Users/206466109/Documents/PT%20-%20Blogs/Lauren%20Guilmartin/Music%20Early%20SEL%20Development/Guilmartin_Music&amp;SEL_SorayaReview.docx#_ednref2">[ii]</a> Gerry, D., Unrau, A., &amp; Trainor, L. J. (2012). Active music classes in infancy enhance musical, communicative and social development. <em>Developmental Science, 15(3),</em> 398-407.</p> </div> </div>
BODYES <p>Hacer música con tus hijos puede ser muy divertido para todos, no importa si están cantando a coro con la radio mientras van en el auto, si usan tazones de plástico como tambores o bailan al ritmo de las canciones que tienes en tu iPod. Además, la música ayuda al desarrollo de los niños en formas muy importantes. ¿Lo mejor de todo esto? No es necesario ser buen cantante ni saber tocar un instrumento. El simple acto de disfrutar y hacer música con tus hijos es un aliciente natural para importantes habilidades sociales y emocionales, como la autorregulación, la autoconfianza, las habilidades de liderazgo, las habilidades sociales y la inteligencia socioemocional.</p> <p>De hecho, investigaciones recientes[i] han detectado que los niños de preescolar que participan en actividades grupales musicales y de movimiento han mostrado una mayor cohesión grupal, cooperación y conducta prosocial en comparación con niños que no han participado en el mismo tipo de actividades. Cantar y bailar juntos llevó a un incremento de la empatía (la habilidad para comprender e incluso compartir los sentimientos de los demás) hacia los niños con quienes estaban haciendo música. Incluso durante la infancia,[ii] la interacción de música y movimiento entre niños y adultos puede conducir a una mejor comunicación, coordinación y conexión social, tanto rítmica como emocional, entre los adultos y los niños. Los investigadores plantean que esto podría servir de apoyo para el desarrollo de las incipientes habilidades de los bebés para interactuar socialmente con otros.</p> <p>Así que puedes divertirte haciendo música con toda la familia y saber que estás ayudando al desarrollo social y al crecimiento emocional de tus hijos. Te presentamos algunas ideas y actividades que puedes hacer en casa para trabajar en diferentes áreas del aprendizaje socioemocional.</p> <p><strong>Autocontrol y autorregulación</strong></p> <p>Cantar una canción como “El perro Bingo”, donde el desafío es que gradualmente se omiten frases de la canción, es una forma divertida para que los niños practiquen una habilidad fundamental para la vida cotidiana: el control de los impulsos. Puedes aplicar esta técnica con casi cualquier canción que tus hijos conozcan. Mientras cantas una melodía conocida, pídele a tu hijo que omita una de las palabras de la próxima frase. Durante el juego, los niños ejercitan el autocontrol y la autorregulación, y experimentan la sensación de resistirse a hacer algo. Es el mismo concepto que se aplica en el popular juego del “Semáforo”.</p> <p><strong>Autoconfianza y habilidades de liderazgo</strong></p> <p>Pídele a tu hijo que comience a cantar una canción, por ejemplo, una que aprendió en la escuela, y TÚ lo sigues. Solo tienes que seguir lo que canta tu hijo, no importa si la letra o la melodía están bien o mal. Esta sencilla actividad le brinda la oportunidad de ser el líder, y refuerza su autoconfianza al notar que aceptas y sigues su forma de interpretar la canción. Del mismo modo funcionan las canciones que les piden a los niños inventar sus propias palabras o sonidos; refuerzan su autoconfianza y habilidades de liderazgo. Por ejemplo, en “El viejo MacDonald tenía una granja”, los niños pueden elegir el animal sobre el que cantarán e imitarán los sonidos que hace ese animal.</p> <p><strong>Habilidades sociales e inteligencia socioemocional</strong></p> <p>No importa si estás haciendo música solo con tu hijo o con toda la familia, hacerlo en grupo es un desafío para los niños. Los hace trabajar con los demás como si fueran una banda, un conjunto. Aprenden lo importante que es respetar el espacio de los demás y cómo expresarse. También aprenden a trabajar en equipo con un objetivo en común (por ejemplo, tomarse de las manos mientras bailan). El respeto, la colaboración y el trabajar en equipo son importantes habilidades sociales que tu hijo debe desarrollar.</p> <p><strong>Desarrollo de la empatía</strong></p> <p>Hacer música en grupo también es un desafío para que los niños presten atención a las personas que los rodean y puedan detectar sutiles cambios en el tiempo, volumen y expresividad... las mismas señales que usamos para interpretar las expresiones faciales y estados de ánimo en los demás. Poder percibir y comprender los sentimientos de los otros es la base para la empatía y el crecimiento moral.</p> <p>Crear música en forma activa con tus hijos es una forma fácil y divertida de ayudar a su desarrollo socioemocional, de enseñarle a desarrollar la autorregulación, autoconfianza, habilidades de liderazgo, habilidades sociales ¡y mucho más! De modo que, la próxima vez que cantes con tu hijo, prueba algunas de las actividades que te sugerimos aquí. Y recuerda, no importa si te consideras una persona “musical” o no, ¡lo más importante es que participes y lo disfrutes con alegría!</p> <div><hr size="1" /> <div> <p><a href="file:///C:/Users/206466109/Documents/PT%20-%20Blogs/Lauren%20Guilmartin/Music%20Early%20SEL%20Development/Guilmartin_Music&amp;SEL_SorayaReview.docx#_ednref1">[i]</a> Kirschner, S. &amp; Tomasello, M. (2010). Joint music-making promotes prosocial behavior in 4-year-old children. <em>Evolution and Human Behavior</em>, <em>31</em>, 354-364.</p> </div> <div> <p><a href="file:///C:/Users/206466109/Documents/PT%20-%20Blogs/Lauren%20Guilmartin/Music%20Early%20SEL%20Development/Guilmartin_Music&amp;SEL_SorayaReview.docx#_ednref2">[ii]</a> Gerry, D., Unrau, A., &amp; Trainor, L. J. (2012). Active music classes in infancy enhance musical, communicative and social development. <em>Developmental Science, 15(3),</em> 398-407.</p> </div> </div>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:29:06.737
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:25:39.597
DESCRIPTION [empty string]
DESCRIPTIONES Hacer música con tus hijos puede ser muy divertido para todos.
EMAILTEXT [empty string]
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Creating Harmony: How Music Can Support Social Emotional Development
LASTUPDATEDBY laurenpoole_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 7FD8BE90-5E4A-11E5-8F900050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-09-21 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE [empty string]
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE [empty string]
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Making music with your child can be so much fun for both of you, whether you’re singing along to the radio in the car, jamming on plastic bowl “drums,” or dancing to songs on your iPod. The simple and enjoyable act of making music with your child naturally fosters important social and emotional skills, such as self-regulation, self-confidence, leadership skills, social skills, and socio-emotional intelligence.
TEASERES Hacer música con tus hijos puede ser muy divertido para todos, no importa si están cantando a coro con la radio mientras van en el auto, si usan tazones de plástico como tambores o bailan al ritmo de las canciones que tienes en tu iPod.
TEASERIMAGE 92105F20-23C7-11E7-88EA0050569A4B6C
TITLE Creating Harmony: How Music Can Support Social Emotional Development
TITLEES Crear armonía: la música como apoyo para el desarrollo social y emocional
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET [empty string]
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 82D13E10-5E4A-11E5-8F900050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

Girl at food drive

Why Learning to Think Beyond Ourselves is the Single Most Important Thing You Can Teach Your Kid

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/2fp09tk
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Today, we can be in our kitchen for breakfast and across the ocean in time for lunch.  From our living room sofa, we can speak face-to-face with someone in Shanghai.  We’re more connected to each other than ever before in human history, and our world continues to get smaller every day.</p> <p>Watching the news, we see the significant challenges that our connectedness can bring—terrorism, epidemics, and cyber threats, just to name a few.  Schools like mine now must teach “21<sup>st</sup> Century Skills” that include maxims like “There is no delete,” and “Nothing is private.”  But, with our help, I believe our children ought to be more hopeful than fearful. </p> <p>Yes, in our connected world, one terrible or reckless moment can do significant harm, <em>but imagine the intentional good that one thoughtful moment might also be able to produce.  </em>If more people had the imagination, the will and the awareness to pursue it, we might accomplish good at a scale and significance unmatched in our history.  This is why it’s so important for us to help our children develop the essential “21<sup>st</sup> Century Skill”: the ability to think beyond themselves.</p> <p>Developmentally, our youngest children will naturally struggle with comprehending a world beyond themselves.  And as they grow up in the “era of selfie,” getting children and adolescents of <em>any</em> age to think beyond themselves poses a challenge.  However, just as it’s far easier to learn to play an instrument or to pick up a second language when you start young, thinking beyond ourselves is a skill that should be acquired and practiced as early and as often as possible.  Our children, and our world, will be better for it.  Here’s how I think we can do this:</p> <p><strong>1. Ask new questions.</strong> </p> <p>Let’s start by asking our children over dinner or at bedtime each night, <em>“What’s something kind you did for someone else today?”</em>  Notice how this is different from the more traditional, “<em>How was your day?</em>” or “<em>What was the best part of your day?</em>”  Those latter questions invite a conversation primarily about what happened <em>to you</em> today--- <em>you</em> are the <em>recipient</em> of what happened.  The new “kindness” question gets us thinking beyond being a recipient, but instead as a contributor, and plants early on in life that essential notion that each day, we ought to be finding some way to impact others.</p> <p>Or here’s another staple from our youth: “<em>What do you want to be when you grow up?</em>”<em>  </em>It’s a worthwhile question, but if we limit ourselves to just this question, we start to subtly suggest that perhaps our purpose in life is simply<em> being</em>, as opposed to <em>doing.  </em>Consider one of these other, more purpose-oriented, questions, instead: “<em>Why do you think you exist?</em>” or “<em>For what purpose are you on this earth?”</em>  It’s harder to answer those questions without thinking of others.  As Einstein (<em>Living Philosophies, </em>1931) so compellingly put it “…<em>there is one thing we do know: that man is here for the sake of other men...”</em></p> <p><em> </em><strong>2. </strong><strong>Model It.</strong></p> <p>As teenagers they might rarely admit it, but for most children, their parents are the single largest influence on who they will become as adults.</p> <p>So even though you might not think your child in the back seat notices, let people merge in front of you during rush hour traffic.  Even though your child seems more interested in the candy selections than anything else in the grocery checkout line, make a point to let the person behind you go in front with their ten items before you unload your twenty items.  Try to stay behind an extra five seconds when you’re entering or exiting a building to hold the door for others coming behind you.  Make a point to thank the refs for their work after your child’s soccer game (even if they made a bad call).  Pick up the piece of litter you see in the parking lot or on the hiking trail and throw it away so someone else doesn’t have to. </p> <p>Yes, grand gestures of generosity and compassion once or twice a year—or even once or twice a week—might offer some important lessons to our children, but the accumulation of the many daily and hourly “little moments” they witness will be even more consequential in the kind of adult they become.  In each of those little moments, we have an opportunity to model whether we are aware of the needs and the perspectives of others beyond ourselves.  Let’s show our children how it’s done.</p> <p><strong>3. </strong><strong>Remember: Practice Makes Permanent</strong></p> <p>Long ago, I had a teacher who often told us, “<em>Practice <span style="text-decoration: underline;">doesn’t make perfect.  Practice makes permanent.</span></em>”  And, of course, after quizzing us and making us repeat it back to him periodically, it stuck with me… which proved his point.</p> <p>“Thinking beyond ourselves” isn’t a natural instinct for most of us—and especially for our younger children—so the most important thing we can do for them is to practice it in big and small ways until it becomes a habit.  I highly recommend the Random Acts of Kindness website  for all kinds of simple, easy ideas that children can do alone, or together with family and friends.  A few of my favorites:</p> <p>- With your child, fill some plastic bags with care packages for the homeless.  A quick web search can offer ideas for what to include, like lip balm, sunscreen and soft, non-perishable food items.  Keep them in the car to periodically hand out your window the next time you’re at a stop light and have an opportunity to help someone in need. <br />- As a family, make some simple notes or cards for veterans that thank them for their service.  Together with your child, start looking around when you’re in parking lots for license plates that identify veterans so you can leave one of those notes for them, or even hand one to them as they return to their car. Our eighth grade students use Writer’s Workshop as a time to write letters to veterans – they get the added bonus of improving their writing skills while thinking beyond themselves and brightening someone’s day.<br />- And speaking of notes, connect with your local chapter of Meals on Wheels, which delivers meals to homebound seniors.  On any holiday (Christmas, Thanksgiving, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, etc.) make cards with your child that can be delivered along with the meals.<br />- Get in the habit of making clothing or toy donations every time your child receives new clothes or gifts.  For birthdays or Christmas, decide together with your child which gently used items might be a wonderful gift to donate to Goodwill, The Salvation Army, or countless other charitable organizations.  (A related tradition at our school is the “Tooth Fairy Tree”, where each time a student loses a tooth, he or she brings a toothbrush, floss, or toothpaste donation to be given to a family in need.)</p> <h4>Imagine!</h4> <p>Our modern, shrinking, connected world will present our children with some daunting challenges now and in the future.  However, it will also present them with incredible opportunities, if only we take the right steps now to instill and cultivate in them the ability to think beyond themselves.</p> <p>Imagine the future for children raised in an environment where the right questions are regularly asked and others-oriented behavior is constantly modeled.  Imagine the future for children who practice giving back to the community just as often as they practice their math facts for school.  Those children will have an excellent opportunity to live a meaningful life of purpose and impact.  They can be a force for good in this world, knowing they have a power to effect widespread, positive change in ways no other generation ever has.</p> <p><em>Tim Tinnesz is Head of School of St. Timothy’s School in Raleigh, NC and sits on the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Association of Independent Schools.  St. Timothy’s is an Episcopal preparatory school that weaves service opportunities into the curriculum to encourage students to make a positive difference in their community and world. In addition to being a life-long educator, Tim is a father to three sons, ages 5, 7, and 9.  </em></p> <p><em>This piece is part of the Parent Toolkit’s Week of Giving. Click here to read more inspirational stories.</em></p> <p><strong>Follow the Parent Toolkit on <a href="http://bit.ly/2bQX6cp" target="_blank">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/educationnation" target="_blank">Twitter</a>, and <a href="https://www.instagram.com/theparenttoolkit/" target="_blank">Instagram</a>.</strong></p>
BODYES <p>Hoy en día podemos estar desayunando en casa y cruzar al otro lado del mundo para almorzar. Desde el sofá de nuestra sala podemos hablar frente a frente con alguien que está en Shanghái. Estamos más conectados que nunca en la historia de la humanidad, y las distancias se acortan cada vez más.</p> <p>Al mirar las noticias vemos los grandes desafíos que trae la conectividad: terrorismo, epidemias, amenazas cibernéticas, por mencionar algunas. En las escuelas ahora debemos enseñar “Habilidades para el siglo XXI”, que incluyen máximas tales como “No hay forma de borrarlo” y “Nada es privado”. Pero con nuestra ayuda, creo que los niños tendrán más esperanzas que temores.</p> <p>Sí, en este mundo conectado, un mal momento o una imprudencia pueden causar un gran daño, <em>pero imaginemos el bien que podemos hacer con solo un momento de reflexión</em>. Si muchas más personas tuvieran la imaginación, la voluntad y la conciencia para hacerlo, podríamos hacer el bien a gran escala con consecuencias inigualadas en nuestra historia. Por eso es tan importante que ayudemos a nuestros hijos a desarrollar la habilidad fundamental para el siglo XXI: la capacidad de pensar en algo más que en ellos mismos.</p> <p>A nivel de desarrollo, a los niños más pequeños les resultará más difícil comprender que allá afuera hay un mundo que abarca mucho más que a ellos mismos, y a medida que crecen en la “era de la selfie”, hacer que los niños y los adolescentes de cualquier edad piensen en algo más que en ellos mismos nos presenta un gran desafío. Sin embargo, así como es más fácil aprender a tocar un instrumento o a hablar un segundo idioma cuando se comienza de pequeño, pensar en algo más que en nosotros mismos es una habilidad que debería adquirirse y ponerse en práctica tan pronto y con la mayor frecuencia posible. Nuestros niños y el mundo estarían mejor si fuera así. Esta es mi propuesta para conseguirlo:</p> <p><strong>1. Haz preguntas nuevas.</strong></p> <p>Comencemos preguntándole a nuestros hijos durante la cena o antes de ir a dormir <em>“¿Hoy hiciste algo bueno por alguien?”</em> Notemos la diferencia con las más tradicionales <em>“¿Cómo te fue hoy?”</em> o <em>“¿Qué fue lo mejor del día?”</em>. Este tipo de preguntas invitan a iniciar una conversación centrada en lo que te ocurrió <em>a ti, tú</em> eres el receptor de lo que ocurrió. La nueva pregunta sobre “hacer algo bueno” nos obliga a pensar en algo más que ser el mero receptor de las acciones, si no en ser un colaborador. De este modo, introducimos desde muy jóvenes la noción de que cada día debes hacer algo para ayudar a los demás.</p> <p>Este es otro ejemplo: <em>“¿Qué quieres ser cuando seas grande?”</em> Es una pregunta válida, pero si nos limitamos solo a esta pregunta, sutilmente comenzamos a sugerir que tal vez nuestro propósito en la vida es simplemente <em>ser</em>, en contraposición a <em>hacer</em>. Consideremos entonces hacer otras preguntas, más orientadas hacia los propósitos: <em>“¿Por qué crees que existes?”</em> o<em> “¿Cuál es tu propósito en este mundo?”</em> Es mucho más difícil responder a estas preguntas si no pensamos en los demás. Como bien dijo Einstein: “…<em>una cosa sí sabemos: el hombre está en este mundo por el bien de los demás hombres...”(Living Philosophies, 1931)</em></p> <p><strong>2. Crea un modelo a seguir.</strong></p> <p>Los adolescentes nunca lo admitirán, pero para la mayoría de los niños, los padres son su principal influencia y un modelo a seguir para cuando sean adultos.</p> <p>Aunque creas que tu hijo no lo notará mientras va sentado en el asiento trasero, cede el paso a los otros autos durante la hora pico. Aunque tu hijo parezca estar prestando más atención a la variedad de dulces mientras están en la fila para pagar en la tienda, antes de que tú pongas en la cinta transportadora tus muchas bolsas, deja pasar antes a esa persona que está detrás de ti y que solo lleva unos pocos artículos. Cuando entres o salgas de un edificio, demora unos segundos más y sostén la puerta para los que entran o salen después de ti. Después del partido de fútbol de tus hijos, agradece a los árbitros por su trabajo, incluso si tomaron una mala decisión. Recoge la basura que veas en el estacionamiento o al costado del camino y tírala donde corresponde para que otra persona no tenga que hacerlo.</p> <p>Sí, los grandes gestos de generosidad y compasión pueden ofrecer una importante lección a nuestros hijos, ya sea una o dos veces al año, e incluso una o dos veces a la semana. La acumulación de estas “pequeñas acciones” que ellos presencien tendrán importantes consecuencias en su vida como adultos. En cada uno de esos pequeños momentos tendrás una oportunidad para demostrar que podemos ser conscientes de las necesidades y perspectivas de los demás. Demostrémosle a nuestros niños como se hace.</p> <p><strong>3. Recuerda: la práctica hace que las cosas sean permanentes.</strong></p> <p>Hace muchos años, tenía un maestro que nos decía <em>“La práctica <span style="text-decoration: underline;">no</span> hace al maestro. La práctica hace que las cosas sean permanentes”.</em> Por supuesto, después de hacernos preguntas y pedirnos de repetirlo periódicamente, la frase se me pegó... lo cual confirma su dicho.</p> <p>“Pensar en algo más que en nosotros mismos” no surge naturalmente en la mayoría de las personas, en especial los más jóvenes, de modo que lo mejor que podemos hacer por ellos es poner esto en práctica y repetirlo hasta que se transforme en un hábito. Recomiendo mucho el sitio web Random Acts of Kindness, que ofrece ideas muy simples y sencillas para que los niños puedan implementar por sí mismos o junto a su familia y amigos. Estas son algunas de mis favoritas:</p> <ul> <li>Prepara con tus hijos paquetes de ayuda para las personas sin techo. Una rápida búsqueda en Internet te puede dar ideas sobre qué puedes incluir: bálsamo labial, protector solar, alimentos no perecederos. Guárdalos en el auto para tenerlos siempre a mano, y la próxima vez que vayas por la calle podrás ayudar a alguien que lo necesita.</li> <li>Todos juntos en familia escriban cartas breves o tarjetas a los veteranos de guerrea para agradecerles por su servicio al país. Vayan a un estacionamiento y busquen los autos que tengan matrículas que identifican a los veteranos y dejen las notas o tarjetas en el parabrisas. También pueden esperar a que regresen a retirar sus autos y entregárselas directamente. Una de las actividades del taller de escritura de los alumnos de 8.º grado fue escribir cartas a los veteranos. No solo pudieron practicar y mejorar sus habilidades para la escritura, si no que hicieron algo por los demás y le alegraron el día a otra persona.</li> <li>Ponte en contacto con la sede local de Meals on Wheels, que entrega viandas a los adultos mayores que no pueden salir de su casa. Prepara con tus hijos tarjetas para Navidad, Acción de Gracias, el Día de la Madre, el Día del Padre, etc. para que las entreguen junto con las viandas.</li> <li>Cada vez que a tus hijos les regalen ropa o juguetes, revisa la ropa o juguetes que ya no usen para poder donarlos. Para sus cumpleaños o Navidad, decidan juntos qué prendas o artículos en buen estado podrían donar al Ejeécito de Salvación u otras organizaciones benéficas. (En nuestra escuela tenemos una tradición que llamamos “El Árbol del Ratoncito Pérez”. Cuando a un alumno se le cae un diente, hace una donación de cepillos de dientes, hilo dental o dentífrico que luego se entrega a familias necesitadas).</li> </ul> <h4>¡Imagina!</h4> <p>Nuestro mundo moderno, conectado y cada vez más chico, presentará desafíos abrumadores a nuestros hijos; ahora y en el futuro. Pero también les presentará increíbles oportunidades si ahora tomamos las acciones correctas para inculcar y cultivar en ellos la capacidad de pensar en los demás.</p> <p>Imagina el futuro de los niños criados en un ambiente donde se hacen las preguntas correctas y la conducta orientada hacia los demás se alienta en forma constante. Imagina el futuro de los niños que ayudan a la comunidad con la misma frecuencia con que practican las tablas de multiplicar. Esos niños tendrán una excelente oportunidad de llevar una vida plena, con un propósito. Pueden ser una de las fuerzas del bien para este mundo, porque saben que tienen el poder de hacer cambios positivos y en gran escala, en formas que las generaciones anteriores no han podido hacer.</p> <p><em>Tim Tinnesz es Director de la escuela St. Timothy’s en Raleigh, NC. También es miembro de la Junta Directiva de la North Carolina Association of Independent Schools. St. Timothy es una escuela preparatoria episcopal que incluye actividades de servicio comunitario en el plan de estudios para alentar a los estudiantes a marcar una diferencia positiva en su comunidad y en el mundo. Además de ser educador, Tim es padre de tres hijos de 5, 7 y 9 años.</em></p> <p><em>Este artículo forma parte de la Semana de Consejos de Parent Toolkit. Haz clic aquí para leer más historias inspiradoras</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,03CC4DA8-5056-9A4B-6CDB224EDE2B8CC6,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY jonamar_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:31:50.21
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:39:38.277
DESCRIPTION Learning to think beyond ourselves is the single more important thing you can teach your child.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit about why thinking beyond ourselves is important to teach your child.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Learn why it's important to help your child to develop the ability to think beyond themselves:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Why Learning to Think Beyond Ourselves is the Single Most Important Thing You Can Teach Your Kid
LASTUPDATEDBY jonamar_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 173BECD0-ADC3-11E6-89870050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 03CC4DA8-5056-9A4B-6CDB224EDE2B8CC6
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-11-21 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Why Thinking Beyond Ourselves Is Important
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Why Thinking Beyond Ourselves Is Important
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Remember: Practice Makes Permanent.
TEASERES Hoy en día podemos estar desayunando en casa y cruzar al otro lado del mundo para almorzar.
TEASERIMAGE B7C41280-189A-11E7-8A820050569A4B6C
TITLE Why Learning to Think Beyond Ourselves is the Single Most Important Thing You Can Teach Your Kid
TITLEES Por qué aprender a pensar en algo más que nosotros mismos es lo más importante que puedes enseñarle a tus hijos
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Teaching your child to think beyond themselves is especially important in the 21st century. Find out why:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array
1 212723E0-ADC3-11E6-89870050569A5318
expertObj
array [empty]

42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/295ENBg
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Empathy is the ability to identify with and feel for another person. It’s the powerful quality that halts violent and cruel behavior and urges us to treat others kindly. Empathy emerges naturally and quite early, which means our children are born with a huge built-in advantage for success and happiness. But although children are born with the capacity for empathy, it must be nurtured and takes commitment and relentless, deliberate action every day and can’t be left to chance.</p> <p>Here are 42 simple ways to help us raise empathetic children despite a plugged-in, me-centered culture. These ideas are from my latest book, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/UnSelfie-Empathetic-Succeed-All-About-Me-World/dp/1501110039"><em>UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About Me World</em></a>(Touchstone, June 2016), which is chock-full of research-based, proven strategies to boost empathy and teaches the nine essential habits of empathy (Emotional Literacy, Moral Identity, Perspective Taking, Moral Imagination, Self-Regulation, Practicing Kindness, Collaboration, Moral Courage and Altruistic leadership). None cost a dime or take a Ph.D. to implement, but using them will help us raise what we all hope for: good people with strong minds <em>and </em>caring hearts. </p> <p><strong>1. Talk feelings. </strong>Kids need an emotion vocabulary to discuss feelings and guidance to become emotionally literate. Point out feelings in films, books, or people and use emotion words<strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong>2. Be an emotion coach. </strong>Find natural moments to connect face-to-face, listen, and validate your child’s feelings while boosting emotional literacy (“You look happy. You seem sad.”)</p> <p><strong>3. Share kind deeds. </strong>Let’s not assume kids know how to show others they care. Tune them up! “That girl looks like she could use a hug.” “I bet that boy hopes someone asks him to play.”</p> <p><strong>4. Make teamwork and caring a priority.</strong>Insist that they consider others, even when it inconveniences them.</p> <p><strong>5. Teach: “Always look at the color of the talker’s eyes.” </strong>Kids must learn to read people’s emotions face to face, so enforce the “color of the talker’s eye” rule to help them use eye contact, and pick up facial expressions, voice tone and emotional cues.</p> <p><strong>6. Make kindness matter</strong>. Instead of, “I want you to be happy.” Stress, “I want you to be kind.”</p> <p><strong>7. Use “Feels + Needs” formula. </strong>Draw attention to people’s feelings, and then ask your child to guess what the person might feel or need in order to change his mood or be comforted.</p> <p><strong>8. Start kid book clubs. </strong>It’s a fun way for parents to connect with their kids and they with peers while boosting empathy and a love of reading. Try: <em>The Mother-Daughter Book Club.</em></p> <p><strong>9. Point out the impact of uncaring</strong>. When you see lack of caring or unkindness, don’t be afraid to lay down the law and say ‘Not in this family.’</p> <p><strong>10. Use the “2 Kind Rule.”</strong> Get kids in the habit of being kind. “Everyday you leave this house I expect you to say or do at least two kind things to someone else.”</p> <p><strong>11. Develop a caring mindset. </strong>Help your child see himself as kindhearted by praising the times he is.</p> <p><strong>12. Use nouns, not verbs.</strong> Using the noun ‘helper’ may motivate children to help more. So if you want your child to see himself as a caring person, highlight times he is a helper. Or ways he could be more of a helper.  </p> <p><strong>13. Focus on character. </strong>Praising kids’ character helps them internalize altruism as part of their identities. So use labels that stress your child’s kind-heartedness. “You’re the kind of person who likes to help others.” Or “You’re a considerate person.”</p> <p><strong>14. Model kindness. </strong>Want a caring child? Model the behaviors you want your child to adopt.</p> <p><strong>15. Do five kind acts a day. </strong>One study found that kids who did five kind acts in one day (like writing a thank-you to a teacher, doing someone’s chores, working at a shelter) - instead of spreading their acts over a week – gained the biggest happiness boost at the end of a six-week study period. So encourage kids to get on a kindness brigade.</p> <p><strong>16. Make kindness a regular happening</strong>. Set an empty box by your door for kids to put gently used toys, books, and games. When filled, deliver it together to a shelter or less-fortunate family.</p> <p><strong>17. Get kids to reflect on kindness.</strong> Instead of always asking, “What did you learn today?” Try: “What’s something kind you did? Or “What’s something nice that someone did for you?”</p> <p><strong>18. Imagine how the person feels<em>.</em> </strong>To help your child identify with the feelings of others, have him imagine how the other person feels about a specific circumstance. </p> <p><strong>19. Share good news. </strong>Cut out news stories about kids who are doing caring deeds and share them with your child and friends to inspire their hearts to do the same.</p> <p><strong>20. Stress the impact. </strong>Help kids see howcaring might make others feel.“How do you think Grandma will feel when she gets your card?” “Make your face look like Sally’s when she opens your gift. You’re right, she’ll be so happy.”</p> <p><strong>21. Make kindness a routine. </strong>Kindness is strengthened by seeing, hearing and practicing kindness. So find simple ways to tune it up and weave it into daily routines.</p> <p><strong>22. Reduce your MEs and increase your WEs. </strong>For instance: What should <em>we </em>do?” “Which would be better for <em>us</em>?” “Let’s take a ‘<em>We’ </em>vote, to do what <em>we </em>choose.”</p> <p><strong>23. Halt the “parading.”</strong> Praise when deserved, but focus on your child’s “inside-out” qualities: their kindness, respect, courage so she sees herself as a caring person.</p> <p><strong>24. Make sure at least half your questions are about your child’s friends.  </strong>You’ll teach your child to think about the world in a different way—that it’s not all about <em>her.</em></p> <p><strong>25. Create a “save, spend, give” system.</strong> Make allowances come with the caveat that kids give a predetermined small portion to the charity of their choice as well as saving a portion.</p> <p><strong>26. Make service a family affair.</strong> Provide opportunities for your child to experience giving to others in your community.</p> <p><strong>27. Help your child create a “caring code.” </strong>Talk to your child often about the kind of person he wants to become, how he wants to make others feel, and what he stands for.</p> <p><strong>28. Urge kids to serve. </strong>Encourage your kids and friends to start a “Care About Others Club” in their neighborhood, school, scout troop, faith group, or community organization.</p> <p><strong>29. Give back frequently.</strong> Don’t assume that a one time visit to the food bank will open your kids’ heart. Empathy is more likely to be expanded with frequent face-to-face visits.</p> <p><strong>30. Teach copers.</strong>Self-regulation helps keep empathy open so teach your child to use deep, slow breaths (“exhale twice as long as you inhale”) to reduce stress and manage strong emotions at the first sign of stress.</p> <p><strong>31. Switch sides<em>. </em></strong>Sibling battle or friendship tiff? Ask conflicting parties involved to “reverse sides” and tell you what happened, but from the other’s side to stretch perspective taking.</p> <p><strong>32. Be “feeling detectives.” </strong>Encourage kids to “investigate” how other people might be feeling. “Listen to the boy’s voice. How do you think he feels?” “Look how that girl has her fists so tight. See the scowl on her face? What do you think she’s saying to the other girl?”</p> <p><strong>33. Choose a summer camp that stresses fun. </strong>A diverse mix of campers doesn’t hurt either!</p> <p><strong>34. Set regular “unplugged” times. </strong>Empathy is learned face to face. Reclaim conversation!</p> <p><strong>35. Hold family movie nights. </strong>Films can be portals to help our children understand other worlds and other views, to be more open to differences and cultivate new perspectives.</p> <p><strong>36. Insist that kids read! </strong>Not only does reading literary fiction (<em>Charlotte’s Web, Wednesday Surprise, Wonder) </em>boost kids academic performance, but it also boosts empathy.</p> <p><strong>37. Find ways to gain a new view.</strong> Depending on your child’s age you might visit a nursing home, homeless shelter, animal shelter, or soup kitchen. The more kids experiences different perspectives, the more likely they can empathize with others whose needs and views differ from theirs.<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>38. Ask, “How would you feel?”</strong> Post questions to help your child think about how she would feel if someone had done the same behavior to her. “Lucas, how would you feel if Aaron yelled out that you can’t hit?”“How would you feel if someone said that to you?”</p> <p><strong>39. Use real events. </strong>The newspaper or television news is rich with possibilities to stretch kids’ empathy.“The fire destroyed their homes. What do you think those kids are feeling and thinking? What can we do to let them know we care?”</p> <p><strong>40. Capture caring moments. </strong>Make sure to display prominently photos of your kids engaged in kind and thoughtful endeavors so they recognize that “caring matters.”</p> <p><strong>41. Use “earshot praise.” </strong>Let your kids overhear (without them thinking they’re supposed to) you describing those qualities to others. “I’m so proud of how kind my child is because…”</p> <p><strong>42. Make a kindness jar. </strong>Each time a parent or child sees <em>another </em>family member act in a kind way, they add a penny, small stone or plastic bead to a large plastic jar. Review the kind acts daily, and if you’re using money, when the jar is full donate the money to a charity of your family’s choice.</p> <p> </p> <p><em><strong><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318" target="_blank">Michele Borba, Ed.D.</a></strong> is an award-winning educational psychologist and an expert in parenting, bullying and character development. She is the author of 22 books including her latest, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/UnSelfie-Empathetic-Succeed-All-About-Me-World/dp/1501110039">UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World.</a> Check out: <a href="http://www.micheleborba.com/">micheleborba.com</a> or follow her on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/micheleborba">@micheleborba.</a></em></p>
BODYES <p>La empatía es la capacidad de identificarse con el otro y sentir por la otra persona. Es una cualidad que frena las conductas crueles y violentas, y nos insta a tratar con amabilidad a los demás. La empatía surge naturalmente y a temprana edad, esto significa que nuestros hijos ya nacen con una gran ventaja para alcanzar el éxito y la felicidad. Pero si bien los niños nacen con empatía, debemos estimularla todos los días, no podemos dejarlo librado al azar. Debemos ser metódicos y constantes.</p> <p>A continuación presentamos 42 consejos sencillos que te ayudarán a criar un hijo empático en una sociedad hiperconectada y centrada en el yo. Estas ideas fueron tomadas de mi último libro, UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About Me World (Touchstone, junio de 2016). En este libro presento gran cantidad de estrategias comprobadas y basadas en investigaciones que te permitirán fomentar la empatía y enseñar los nueve hábitos fundamentales de la empatía: alfabetismo emocional, identidad moral, perspectiva, imaginación moral, autorregulación, amabilidad, colaboración, valentía moral y liderazgo altruista. No es necesario gastar dinero ni estudiar un doctorado para implementarlas, pero usarlas nos ayudará a criar buenas personas, inteligentes y cariñosas.</p> <p><strong>1. Habla sobre los sentimientos.</strong> Los niños necesitan desarrollar un vocabulario emocional para poder expresar sus sentimientos y pedir ayuda, para estar alfabetizados en lo emocional. Señala los sentimientos que se muestran en películas, en libros o en las personas y usa las palabras correspondientes para definir las emociones.</p> <p><strong>2. Ayuda a tu hijo con sus emociones.</strong> Busca momentos que puedan compartir juntos. Escucha y valida los sentimientos de tu hijo mientras estimulas su aprendizaje emocional (“Te vez feliz. Pareces triste”).</p> <p><strong>3. Comparte las buenas acciones.</strong> No demos por sentado que los niños saben demostrar que se preocupan por los demás. ¡Ajústales un poco las tuercas! “A esa niña le haría bien un abrazo”. “Te apuesto a que ese niño espera que alguien lo invite a jugar”.</p> <p><strong>4. Haz que el trabajo en equipo y el interés por los demás sean una prioridad.</strong> Insiste en que deben tomar en cuenta a los demás, aún cuando pueda ser una molestia para ellos.</p> <p><strong>5. Enséñales a mantener siempre el contacto visual.</strong> Los niños deben aprender a leer las emociones en el rostro de la gente. Haz hincapié en que siempre deben mirar a la persona con la que están hablando, para poder interpretar la expresión en su rostro, el tono de voz y los indicios emocionales.</p> <p><strong>6. Haz que la amabilidad sea importante.</strong> En vez de decirle a tu hijo “Quiero que seas feliz”, haz énfasis en decirle “Quiero que seas amable”.</p> <p><strong>7. Aplica la fórmula “sentimientos + necesidades”.</strong> Llama la atención de tu hijo hacia los sentimientos de las personas. Luego, pídele que adivine lo que esa persona podría sentir o necesitar para cambiar su estado de ánimo o ser consolado.</p> <p><strong>8. Inicia un club de lectura para niños.</strong> Es una forma divertida para que los padres pasen tiempo con sus hijos y ellos con sus pares. Al mismo tiempo, estimularás la empatía y el amor por la lectura. Prueba leer The Mother-Daughter Book Club.</p> <p><strong>9. Señala el impacto que causa la indiferencia.</strong> Cuando veas que tus hijos son indiferentes o poco amables, no tengas miedo de aclarar los tantos y decirles “En esta familia no nos comportamos así”.</p> <p><strong>10. Aplica la regla del “acto amable”.</strong> Acostumbra a tus hijos a ser amables. “Espero que todos los días tengas un acto de amabilidad o digas algo amable a otra persona”.</p> <p><strong>11. Desarrolla un esquema mental solidario.</strong> Ayuda a tu hijo a verse a sí mismo como una persona bondadosa; elógialo cuando se comporte así.</p> <p><strong>12. Usa sustantivos, no verbos.</strong> Usar la palabra “ayudante” puede motivar a tus hijos para que ayuden más. Si deseas que tus hijos se perciban a sí mismos como personas solidarias, destaca los momentos en los que se comporta como un “ayudante” o las formas en que podría desempeñar ese rol con más frecuencia.</p> <p><strong>13. Céntrate en el carácter.</strong> Elogiar el carácter de los niños les ayuda a internalizar el altruismo como parte de su identidad. Emplea frases y expresiones que enfaticen la bondad de tu hijo: “Eres una persona que gusta de ayudar a los demás” o “Eres muy considerado”.</p> <p><strong>14. Modela la amabilidad.</strong> ¿Quieres que tu hijo sea amable? Modela las conductas que deseas que tu hijo adopte.</p> <p><strong>15. Realiza cinco actos de amabilidad por día.</strong> Un estudio descubrió que los niños que realizaron cinco actos de amabilidad en un mismo día, en vez de hacerlos en el transcurso de la semana, presentaron los mayores niveles de felicidad al finalizar las seis semanas de duración del estudio. Entre las acciones que realizaron se incluyó escribir una nota de agradecimiento a un maestro, hacer los quehaceres de otro, colaborar en un refugio, etc. Así que alienta a tus hijos a iniciar una cruzada de amabilidad.</p> <p><strong>16. Haz que la amabilidad sea un evento habitual.</strong> Coloca una caja vacía junto a la puerta para que tus hijos coloquen los juguetes, libros y juegos que ya no usen. Una vez llena, pueden llevarla juntos a un refugio o entregarla a una familia menos afortunada.</p> <p><strong>17. Haz que tus hijos reflexionen sobre la amabilidad.</strong> En lugar de hacer siempre la misma pregunta: “¿Qué aprendiste hoy?” Prueba con estas alternativas: “¿Fuiste amable?” o “¿Alguien hizo algo bueno por ti?”</p> <p><strong>18. Imaginen cómo se siente la persona.</strong> Para ayudar a tus hijos a identificarse con los sentimientos de los demás, pídeles que imaginen cómo se siente otra persona ante una situación en especial.</p> <p><strong>19. Comparte las buenas noticias.</strong> Recorta noticias sobre niños que hacen tareas solidarias y compártelas con tus hijos y sus amigos para inspirarlos a hacer lo mismo.</p> <p><strong>20. Enfatiza el impacto que pueden causar.</strong> Ayuda a tus hijos a ver cómo la solidaridad y la amabilidad repercuten en los demás. “¿Cómo crees que se sentirá la abuela cuando reciba tu tarjeta?” “¿Qué cara puso Sally cuando abrió tu regalo? Sí, tienes razón, estaba muy contenta”.</p> <p><strong>21. Haz que la amabilidad sea una rutina.</strong> La amabilidad se refuerza cuando la ponemos en práctica y cuando vemos o escuchamos que se pone en práctica. Busca formas de incorporar esto en las rutinas cotidianas.</p> <p><strong>22. Menos “yo” y más “nosotros”.</strong> Por ejemplo: “¿Qué deberíamos hacer?” “¿Qué sería mejor para nosotros?” “Votemos para elegir una actividad para hacer”.</p> <p><strong>23. Basta de ostentar.</strong> Elogia a tus hijos cuando lo merezcan, pero concéntrate en las cualidades internas: bondad, respeto, valentía, etc. De este modo, tus hijos se verán a sí mismos como personas solidarias.</p> <p><strong>24. Asegúrate de preguntar también por los amigos de tus hijos.</strong> Le enseñarás a tus hijos a ver el mundo de otra manera, que no todo se trata sobre él/ella.</p> <p><strong>25. Crea un sistema de “ahorra, gasta, dona”.</strong> Asigna una mesada a tus hijos, con la condición de que donen una pequeña suma a una organización benéfica que elijan y que otra parte la usen para ahorrar.</p> <p><strong>26. La vocación de servicio es un asunto familiar.</strong> Genera oportunidades para que tus hijos experimenten la vocación de servicio en tu comunidad.</p> <p><strong>27. Ayuda a tus hijos a desarrollar un “código de solidaridad”.</strong> Charla con tus hijos sobre el tipo de persona que quieren ser, cómo quieren hacer sentir a los demás, y cuáles son sus valores.</p> <p><strong>28. Anima a tus hijos a ser solidarios.</strong> Alienta a tus hijos y sus amigos a iniciar un “Club de amigos solidarios” en el barrio, en la escuela, en el grupo de scouts, en el grupo religioso o en organizaciones comunitarias.</p> <p><strong>29. Haz donaciones con frecuencia.</strong> No des por sentado que con visitar el banco de alimentos una sola vez tus hijos se conmoverán y abrirán sus corazones. La empatía se desarrolla con las visitas frecuentes.</p> <p><strong>30. Enséñale a tus hijos técnicas para manejar el estrés.</strong> La autorregulación nos ayuda a que la empatía se manifieste. Enséñale a tus hijos técnicas de respiración (“exhala dos veces más lento de lo que inhalaste”) para ayudarlos a reducir el estrés y a lidiar con emociones fuertes.</p> <p><strong>31. Cambia de bando. ¿Una pelea entre hermanos?</strong> ¿Una riña con amigos? Pídele a las partes en conflicto que “cambien de bando” y te cuenten qué ha ocurrido pero desde la perspectiva del otro, para que aprendan a ver las cosas desde la otra postura.</p> <p><strong>32. “Detectives emocionales".</strong> Anima a tus hijos a “investigar” los sentimientos de las otras personas. “Escucha la voz de ese niño. ¿Cómo crees que se siente?” “Mira cómo esa niña aprieta sus puños. ¿Ves que tiene el ceño fruncido? ¿Qué crees qué le está diciendo a la otra niña?”</p> <p><strong>33. Elige un campamento de verano que priorice la diversión.</strong> También será bueno que la asistencia sea lo más diversa posible.</p> <p><strong>34. Establece momentos para “desconectarse”.</strong> La empatía se aprende mirándose a la cara. ¡Recupera las charlas y las conversaciones frente a frente!</p> <p><strong>35. Organiza noches de cine en familia.</strong> Una película puede ser una excelente puerta de entrada para que los niños conozcan otros mundos y perspectivas, para ser más abiertos a las diferencias y para labrar nuevas perspectivas.</p> <p><strong>36. ¡Insiste con la lectura!</strong> Leer historias de ficción, como Charlotte’s Web, Wednesday Surprise o Wonder, no solo refuerza el desempeño académico de los niños, también refuerza la empatía.</p> <p><strong>37. Busca formas de aportar nuevas perspectivas.</strong> Según la edad de tus hijos, puedes visitar un hogar de ancianos, un refugio para personas sin techo, un refugio para animales o un comedor comunitario. Cuantas más perspectivas distintas conozcan tus hijos, mayor será la probabilidad de empatizar con las personas que tienen necesidades y visiones distintas de las propias.</p> <p><strong>38. Pregunta “¿Tú cómo te sentirías?”</strong> Prepara preguntas para ayudar a tus hijos a analizar cómo se sentirían si otra persona se hubiera comportado de la misma manera. “Lucas, ¿cómo te sentirías si Aaron gritara que no puedes acertarle a la bola?” “¿Cómo te sentirías si alguien te dijera eso?”</p> <p><strong>39. Usa situaciones reales.</strong> Los periódicos y noticieros son excelentes fuentes a las que puedes recurrir para ahondar en el desarrollo de la empatía de tus hijos. “El incendio destruyó su hogar. ¿Cómo se sentirán esos niños, qué estarán pensando? ¿Qué podemos hacer para ayudarlos?”</p> <p><strong>40. Captura los momentos solidarios.</strong> En un lugar destacado de tu casa, coloca fotografías de tus hijos realizando tareas solidarias para que vean que es importante.</p> <p><strong>41. Usa los elogios “disimulados”.</strong> Permite que tus hijos escuchen cómo los elogias (sin que ellos piensen que está bien escuchar conversaciones ajenas). “Estoy muy orgulloso/a de mi hijo/a. Es muy bondadoso porque…”</p> <p><strong>42. Prepara un “frasco de la amabilidad”.</strong> Cada vez que los padres o niños vean a otro miembro de familia comportándose amablemente, guardarán un centavo, una piedra pequeña o una cuenta de plástico en un frasco grande. Evalúa las buenas acciones todos los días y, si deciden usar dinero, una vez que el frasco esté lleno pueden donar ese dinero a una organización benéfica que elija la familia.</p> <p><em>Michele Borba, Ed.D. es una premiada psicóloga educativa y experta en crianza, bullying y desarrollo de carácter. Es autora de 22 libros y su última publicación se titula UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World. Visita: micheleborba.com o síguela en Twitter @micheleborba.</em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB,0F3C0CEE-5056-9A4B-6C0FE6AD9F994DB8
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:30:06.64
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-14 16:36:00.25
DESCRIPTION Although children are born with the capacity for empathy, it must be nurtured with deliberate action every day - and can’t be left to chance.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this Parent Toolkit article from educational psychology expert Dr. Michele Borba on 42 simple ways parents can raise empathetic kids.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EXTERNALLINK [empty string]
EXTERNALLINKES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Educational psychology expert Dr. Michele Borba shares her list of 42 easy ways parents can raise kids to embody empathy throughout their lives.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID F2B7EF20-37F3-11E6-AEE40050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2016-06-22 10:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
SOURCEOBJ [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Although children are born with the capacity for empathy, it must be nurtured and takes commitment and relentless, deliberate action every day and can’t be left to chance.
TEASERES La empatía es la capacidad de identificarse con el otro y sentir por la otra persona.
TEASERIMAGE DB4AA7B0-1EBB-11E7-931C0050569A4B6C
TITLE 42 Simple Ways to Raise an Empathetic Kid
TITLEES 42 formas simples de criar un hijo empático
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET @EducationNation educational psychology expert Dr. Michele Borba shares 42 ways parents can raise empathetic kids:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmBlog
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

Grumpy Kid

Stress Less: Calming Strategies

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1OlMWju
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1NmPqhw
BODY <p>Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Have you had a hard time managing those emotions? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. In this video, you’ll find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down. </p>
BODYES <p>&iquest;Alguna vez se ha sentido estresado, enojado o frustrado? &iquest;Ha sido dif&iacute;cil manejar esas emociones? Lo m&aacute;s probable es que s&iacute;, y que sus hijos se han sentido igual. En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (&iexcl;y usted!) se mantenga calmo.</p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-10-06 16:49:45.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:31.947
DESCRIPTION Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. Find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on strategies to help you and your child tackle stress.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141585174?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/141586478?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" height="281" width="500" frameBorder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/141585174
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/141586478
FACEBOOKTEXT Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. Find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down.
FACEBOOKTEXTES ¿Alguna vez se ha sentido estresado, enojado o frustrado? ¿Ha sido difícil manejar esas emociones? Lo más probable es que sí, y que sus hijos se han sentido igual. En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (¡y usted!) se mantenga calmo.
LABEL Stress Less: Calming Strategies
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID C59DC5E0-6C6B-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B74C589-5056-9A4B-6C110E4AF16FC949
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2015-10-06 16:49:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Strategies to Help Your Child Tackle Stress
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Stress Less: Calming Strategies
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Strategies to Help Your Child Tackle Stress
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Have you had a hard time managing those emotions? Chances are, you have. And so have your children. Find strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down by watching the Support Social & Emotional Development video series on ParentToolkit.com!
TEASERES ¿Alguna vez se ha sentido estresado, enojado o frustrado? ¿Ha sido difícil manejar esas emociones? Lo más probable es que sí, y que sus hijos se han sentido igual. En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (¡y usted!) se mantenga calmo.
TEASERIMAGE D0264BB0-18D9-11E7-81B40050569A4B6C
TITLE Stress Less: Calming Strategies
TITLEES Estresarse Menos: Estrategias Para Mantener la Calma
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Vídeo: En este video encontrara estrategias para ayudar a que su hijo (¡y usted!) se mantenga calmo.
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Have you ever felt stressed, angry or frustrated? Learn strategies to help your child (and you!) calm down
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 EDC09713-0793-7966-3CBC318C02159515
2 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D

Health and Wellness

Proper nutrition, adequate sleep, and physical activity can all impact academic performance and overall mental and physical wellness.

Nutrition

Motivate your child to establish healthy eating habits by teaching them how they can select the healthier foods including fruits, vegetables, protein and more.

Physical Health

This section has things like benchmarks and videos that will help you track your child’s development and encourage healthy physical activity.

Recommended

Grocery Store Aisle

7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1icUKlm
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Getting kids to make healthy food choices can be a challenge, and some of the foods marketed to kids and parents as “healthy” actually aren’t. We asked American Heart Association spokeswoman <a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=3E44A7D0-9B07-11E3-A6F30050569A5318">Dr. Rachel Johnson</a> to help us tell the good from the bad. Here are 7 examples of supposedly healthy foods to pay attention to before serving to your child.</p> <h4>Yogurt</h4> <p>Yogurt is a great source of calcium, protein, and potassium and is often fortified with vitamin D. But kids’ yogurts are often flavored, full of added sugars, and high in fat. Some kids’ yogurt even comes with cookie or candy toppings. These are not healthy choices. Instead, try low or nonfat plain yogurt that you can sweeten yourself at home with cut-up fruit or a small amount of honey. If your child is picky, try mixing nonfat plain yogurt with the flavored yogurt she’s used to.</p> <h4>Granola</h4> <p>Granola often sounds like a healthy choice, but it can be high in fat, sugar, and calories. Granola that is marketed as lower fat often has additional sugar to make it taste better. Look closely at the labels and particularly at serving sizes. Many granolas offer only ¼ cup per serving, which is often less than we might serve. Instead, think of granola as a topping for yogurt or fruit, and don’t rely on it as a cereal.</p> <h4>Energy Bars</h4> <p>Energy Bars can be really high in calories and sugar. These bars, high in protein and fiber, are  intended as a substitute for meals, rather than a snack. Dr. Johnson says if your child is eating them as a snack, she might as well eat a candy bar.</p> <h4>Smoothies</h4> <p>Smoothies are another tricky item. When made at home, where you can control the portion size and ingredients, they can be a good option for a quick breakfast. But pre-packaged or restaurant smoothies can have a lot of added sugars and extra calories. Some smoothies can have as many calories as a milkshake. When ordering a smoothie, make sure it is made with nonfat yogurt, no added sugars, and whole fruits rather than juice.</p> <h4>Salad Bars</h4> <p>Salad bars are incredibly popular right now at restaurants and in some school cafeterias, but it’s important for your child to choose healthy options from the assortment of ingredients. If your child’s salad has a lot of cheese, croutons, and bacon bits, and is topped with a full-fat ranch dressing, that’s not a very healthy option. Instead, focus on incorporating more vegetables, like shredded carrots, beans, and tomatoes and using a low-fat dressing.</p> <h4>100% Fruit Gummies</h4> <p>While 100% fruit gummies may seem like a fun way for your child to eat fruit, most gummies are made from concentrated fruit juice. Which is basically the same as cane sugar. Gummies offer no nutritional value like phytonutrients or fiber, both of which are found in whole fruits. Instead, offer your child whole fruits.</p> <h4>Multigrain Crackers</h4> <p>Just because a product says “multigrain” does not mean it is healthy. Multigrain only means there is more than one grain in the product. Try to focus more on whole grains, and make sure to check the labels. A whole-grain cracker is a better choice than a multigrain cracker made with no whole grains. </p>
BODYES <p>Hacer que los niños coman de manera saludable puede ser un gran desafío, y algunos de los alimentos publicitados como “saludables” para los niños en realidad no lo son. Le pedimos a la Dra. Rachel Johnson, vocera de la American Heart Association, que nos ayude a identificar los alimentos saludables y los no saludables. Estos son 7 ejemplos de alimentos aparentemente saludables y a los que debes prestar atención antes de servírselos a tus hijos.</p> <h4>Yogur</h4> <p>El yogur es una excelente fuente de calcio, proteínas y potasio, y muchas veces está fortificado con vitamina D. Pero los yogures para niños suelen ser saborizados, tienen azúcar añadida y un alto contenido de grasas. Algunos yogures para niños incluyen galletas o golosinas y estas no son opciones saludables. En lugar de esto, prueba el yogur natural con bajo contenido en grasas o descremado; puedes endulzarlo tú mismo con trozos de frutas frescas o un poquito de miel. Si tu hijo es quisquilloso, prueba de mezclar el yogur natural descremado con el yogur saborizado que suele comer.</p> <h4>Granola</h4> <p>La granola siempre parece ser una opción saludable, pero suele tener grandes cantidades de grasas, azúcar y calorías. La granola que se comercializa como reducida en grasas tiene azúcar añadida para darle mejor sabor. Presta mucha atención a las etiquetas, en especial a los tamaños de las porciones. Muchas granolas ofrecen solo ¼ de taza por porción, que es mucho menos de la cantidad que serviríamos. Usa la granola para espolvorear el yogurt o frutas y no la consumas como reemplazo de los cereales.</p> <h4>Barritas energéticas</h4> <p>Las barritas energéticas tienen un alto contenido de calorías y azúcar. Estas barritas, ricas en proteínas y fibras, están pensadas para consumir como reemplazo de una comida y no como un bocadillo. La Dra. Johnson aclara que si tu hijo las come como bocadillos, bien podría comer una barra de dulce.</p> <h4>Batidos de frutas</h4> <p>Los batidos de frutas son otro alimento engañoso. Cuando los preparamos en casa podemos controlar el tamaño de la porción y los ingredientes, y pueden ser una buena opción para un desayuno rápido. Pero los batidos envasados o de restaurante puede tener grandes cantidades de azúcar añadida y calorías extra. Algunos batidos pueden tener las mismas calorías que una malteada. Cuando pidas un batido de frutas, asegúrate de que lo preparan con yogur descremado, sin azúcar añadida y con frutas frescas en lugar de jugo.</p> <h4>Barras de ensaladas</h4> <p>Las barras de ensaladas son muy populares actualmente en los restaurantes y en algunos comedores escolares, pero es importante que tu hijo elija opciones saludables entre la variedad de ingredientes disponibles. Si la ensalada tiene mucha cantidad de queso, crutones y trocitos de tocino, y la condimenta con aderezo Ranch regular, no es una opción muy saludable. Concéntrate en destacar la importancia de incorporar más vegetales, como zanahoria rallada, frijoles y tomate y condimentar con un aderezo reducido en grasas.</p> <h4>Gominolas 100% fruta</h4> <p>Si bien las gominolas 100% fruta pueden parecer una forma divertida de hacer que tu hijo coma frutas, la mayoría están elaboradas con jugo concentrado de frutas que, básicamente, es lo mismo que el azúcar de caña. Las gominolas no aportan valores nutricionales como los fitonutrientes o la fibra, que sí están presentes en las frutas frescas. En vez de esto, ofrécele frutas frescas a tu hijo.</p> <h4>Galletas multicereal</h4> <p>Solo porque un producto dice que es “multicereal” no significa que es saludable. Multicereal solo quiere decir que hay más de un tipo de cereal en el producto. Trata de buscar productos con cereales integrales y revisa las etiquetas. Una galleta con cereales integrales es una mejor opción que una galleta multicereal sin cereales integrales.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
CMLABEL 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:05:28.837
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:27:52.41
DESCRIPTION It’s important for your child to choose healthy options from the assortment of ingredients.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit about kids' foods that aren't as healthy as you would think.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Some foods aren't as healthy as you think. Find out what they are:
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 714736F0-ADE7-11E3-AF530050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F468E5E5-5056-9A4B-6CEC4FEE606FB8B8
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-03-17 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER <p class="Normal1">Getting kids to make healthy food choices can be a challenge, and some of the foods marketed to kids and parents as “healthy” actually aren’t. We asked American Heart Association spokeswoman Dr. Rachel Johnson to help us tell the good from the bad. Here are 7 examples of supposedly healthy foods to pay attention to before serving to your child. </p>
SHORTTEASERES Hacer que los niños coman de manera saludable puede ser un gran desafío, y algunos de los alimentos publicitados como “saludables” para los niños en realidad no lo son.
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Salad bars are incredibly popular right now at restaurants and in some school cafeterias, but it’s important for your child to choose healthy options from the assortment of ingredients.
TEASERES Hacer que los niños coman de manera saludable puede ser un gran desafío, y algunos de los alimentos publicitados como “saludables” para los niños en realidad no lo son.
TEASERIMAGE 4E104990-208C-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
TITLE 7 "Healthy" Kids' Foods That Aren't
TITLEES 7 alimentos "saludables" para niños, que en realidad no lo son
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Some foods aren't as healthy as you think. Find out what they are via @EducationNation
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Active Kids

Keeping Kids Active

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1QM362e
BITLYLINKES http://bit.ly/1Mo5oU3
BODY <p>Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day. Here’s some ideas!</p>
BODYES <p>El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas! </p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
CREATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2015-05-19 12:33:25.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 12:01:12.96
DESCRIPTION Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you would like this video on how you can take advantage of your local parks and community organizations during the summertime.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
EMBEDCODE <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/130322601?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDCODEES <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/130323019?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0"></iframe></p>
EMBEDURL https://vimeo.com/130322601
EMBEDURLES https://vimeo.com/130323019
FACEBOOKTEXT Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day.
FACEBOOKTEXTES El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas!
LABEL Keeping Kids Active
LASTUPDATEDBY lpalazio_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID C5387400-FE44-11E4-959C0050569A5318
OWNEDBY 7C299360-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2015-05-19 12:33:00.0
SEOTITLE VIDEO: Keeping Kids Active During the Summertime
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE Keeping Kids Active
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE VIDEO: Keeping Kids Active During the Summertime
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations while also keeping kids from sitting in front of the TV all day. Here’s some ideas! Find out more watching the Summer Success video series at ParentToolkit.com.
TEASERES El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas!
TEASERIMAGE D5FC02B0-18A6-11E7-8E3F0050569A4B6C
TITLE Keeping Kids Active
TITLEES Promover La Actividad Física De Los Niños
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES Vídeo: El verano puede ser un buen tiempo para tomar ventaja de sus parques locales y organizaciones de la comunidad y también prevenir que los niños estén sentados frente de la televisión todo el día. ¡Aquí hay algunas ideas!
TWITTERTWEET VIDEO: Summertime can be a great way to take advantage of your local parks and community organizations
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmVideos
VERSIONID [empty string]
expertObj
array
1 89BE98A0-9B08-11E3-A6F30050569A5318
2 84B78F00-9B09-11E3-A6F30050569A5318
3 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318

kid with kite

Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1WrmKZm
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p><em>60 minutes a day.</em></p> <p>That is what the current <a href="http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/">Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans</a> recommend as a minimum for daily physical activity.</p> <p>Only about half of youth in the United States are getting that.</p> <p>Promoting physical activity can be a daunting task for some parents. But research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is extremely important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.</p> <p>The Institute of Medicine of the National Academics published a <a href="http://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2013/Educating-the-Student-Body-Taking-Physical-Activity-and-Physical-Education-to-School.aspx">report</a> in May 2013, finding extensive scientific evidence that regular physical activity improves a child’s mental and cognitive health.</p> <p>The report found “Children who are more active show greater attention, have faster cognitive processing speed, and perform better on standardized academic tests than children who are less active.”</p> <p>Many parents wonder how they can enhance their child’s physical activity with busy schedules and limited time.</p> <p>The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia physician Dr. Shirley Huang has three tips for parents: “Keep it simple, keep it fun, and keep it up with someone.”</p> <h4><strong>Keep it simple.</strong></h4> <p>“Even though we all try to overextend ourselves to try to reach goals that are overambitious, it's more helpful to keep your activity goal simple.  We all have busy lives in different ways.  So even if your goal is to walk the dog for 15 minutes right after dinner together, this is a perfect goal if you can actually accomplish this realistically,” Huang said.</p> <p>Miami-Dade County Public School District Director of Physical Education Dr. Jayne Greenberg said starting simple means being a role model for your children.</p> <p>“We encourage parents to be active with their children,” Greenberg said. “Do simple things that incorporate physical activity into the everyday: walks after dinner, a family bike ride, Frisbee in the park…anything that gets you all moving together.”</p> <h4><strong>Keep if fun.</strong></h4> <p>“People often think about 'exercise' as the means for physical activity.  For some people this may be the case, for others, it may not be.  Fun may mean different things to different people.  Some people love running, others hate it.  Some people love going to the gym, others avoid the gym.  Some people love biking.  Some people love playing basketball with other kids on the street.  Some people love taking a walk and catching up with friend.  Whatever activity you are considering doing, make sure you are having fun doing it!” Huang said.</p> <p>The Miami-Dade School District has incorporated a variety of activities in to their physical education program. Kayaking, paddle boarding, Dance Dance Revolution and climbing walls encourage children to enjoy their physical activity.</p> <p> “It starts with fun,” Greenberg said. “If physical activity is fun, you will get kids participating.”</p> <p>While not all schools have the kind of program that Miami-Dade does, Greenberg said giving your child options in their activities helps them to take control of their healthy lifestyle.</p> <p>“There are intramurals, clubs, swimming lessons, walking, going to the park,” Greenberg said. “There are so many easy ways to add activity that is fun and beneficial to a child’s day.”</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=07E69710-D0B4-11E3-87440050569A5318" target="_blank">Read: A Teen's Guide's for Parents: What Never to Say About My Body</a></p> <h4><strong>Keep it up with someone</strong>. </h4> <p>“How many times have you had such a hard time getting yourself to do something, but then when you actually do it, you enjoy it?  Motivation to get yourself started is always the hardest part.  Sometimes having a buddy to keep you accountable is the key to get yourself moving.  Make plans to walk with your family.  Meet your classmate at the gym.  Commit to walking your dog who may be your best friend.  Share an activity with someone who can help you keep on track with being active!” Huang said.</p> <p>Greenberg remembered walking or biking to school every day with friends when she was young.</p> <p>“Now we are afraid to let our kids walk on the street alone,” Greenberg said. “You don’t see kids playing on the streets anymore. So parents have to find ways to engage their children with other activities and other people.”</p> <p>Greenberg suggests the walking school bus. A walking school bus is a group of children walking to school with at least one adult. And it is just as simple as it sounds. It only takes a couple families to take turns walking with their children to school.</p> <p>By including another family in your daily walk to school, you are more motivated to keep up with it. You can find a printable guide to the walking school bus <a href="http://www.walkingschoolbus.org/WalkingSchoolBus_pdf.pdf">here</a>.</p> <p>“It is little changes and education,” Greenberg said. “Our kids are getting it. We are using them as the change agents. They are the ones encouraging their parents now. They have changed their lifestyles.”</p> <p>When parents prioritize physical activity, they prioritize educating the whole child. “Academics, health, body, mind, creativity,” Greenberg said. “They are all connected.”</p>
BODYES <p><em>60 minutos por día.</em></p> <p>Ese es el tiempo mínimo que recomienda Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans para actividad física diaria.</p> <p>Solo alrededor de la mitad de los jóvenes en Estados Unidos lo cumple.</p> <p>Fomentar la actividad física puede ser una tarea abrumadora para algunos padres. Sin embargo, distintas investigaciones sugieren que incentivar a tu hijo a hacer ejercicio en los primeros años es muy importante, no solo para evitar la obesidad infantil, sino también para contribuir en su rendimiento académico.</p> <p>The Institute of Medicine of the National Academics publicó un informe en mayo de 2013, en el que se mencionaba la existencia de evidencia científica que demuestra que la actividad física regular mejora la salud mental y cognitiva del joven.</p> <p>El informe indicó también que “los niños que son más activos desarrollan un mayor poder de atención, sus procesos cognitivos son más rápidos y tienen un mejor desempeño en pruebas académicas estandarizadas respecto de los niños menos activos”.</p> <p>Muchos padres se preguntan cómo pueden aumentar la actividad física de su hijo con cronogramas llenos de actividades y poco tiempo libre.</p> <p>Una médica de The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, la Dra. Shirley Huang, tiene tres consejos para los padres: “Que sea simple, divertido y compartido”.</p> <h4>QUE SEA SIMPLE</h4> <p>“Si bien todos intentamos multiplicarnos para alcanzar objetivos por demás ambiciosos, es esencial reconocer que es más útil fijarse un objetivo simple. Todos estamos ocupados en distintas cosas. Entonces, si tu objetivo es sacar a pasear a tu perro por 15 minutos después de cenar, es un objetivo perfecto, si puedes lograrlo”, aseguró Huang.</p> <p>La directora de Educación Física del distrito escolar de Miami-Dade County, la Dra. Jayne Greenberg, sostuvo que comenzar con un objetivo simple se traduce en un modelo ejemplificador para tu hijo.</p> <p>“Alentamos a los padres a que se muestren activos frente a sus hijos”, agregó Greenberg. “Haz cosas simples para incorporar la actividad física en tu vida diaria: caminar después de la cena, andar en bicicleta con la familia, jugar al Frisbee en el parque…cualquier actividad que les permita moverse juntos”.</p> <h4>QUE SEA DIVERTIDO</h4> <p>“Se suele pensar en el ‘ejercicio’ como el recurso de la actividad física. Para algunos es así, para otros, no. La diversión puede significar distintas cosas para cada individuo. Algunas personas aman correr, otras lo odian. Algunas personas adoran ir al gimnasio, otras lo evitan. A algunas personas les encanta andar en bicicleta. A otras les gusta jugar al básquetbol con otros niños en la calle. Algunos prefieren caminar y ponerse al día con un amigo. ¡No importa qué actividad elijas, asegúrate de divertirte cuando la hagas!”, sugirió Huang.</p> <p>El distrito escolar de Miami-Dade ha incorporado una variedad de actividades en su programa de educación física. Kayak, surf de remo, <em>Dance Dance Revolution</em> y la escalada de muros estimulan a los niños a disfrutar de la actividad física.</p> <p>“Comienza con diversión”, aseguró Greenberg. “Si la actividad física es divertida, tus hijos participarán”.</p> <p>Si bien no todas las escuelas tienen el tipo de programa que sí ofrece Miami-Dade, Greenberg sostiene que darle opciones a tu hijo en sus actividades los ayuda a tener control de un estilo de vida saludable.</p> <p>“Hay actividades en organizaciones, clubs, clases de natación, caminatas, paseos en el parque”, según Greenberg. “Hay muchas formas simples de sumar actividades que sean divertidas y beneficiosas para tu hijo”.</p> <h4>QUE SEA COMPARTIDO</h4> <p>“¿Cuántas veces tuviste que hacer un gran esfuerzo para hacer algo, pero luego mientras lo haces te das cuenta de que lo disfrutas? Motivarte para comenzar una actividad es la parte más difícil. A veces, compartir la actividad con un amigo genera una responsabilidad que es la clave para llevar adelante esa actividad. Organízate para salir a caminar con tu familia. Reúnete con tu compañero de clase en el gimnasio. Comprométete a sacar a pasear a tu perro, que puede ser tu mejor amigo. ¡Comparte una actividad para ayudarte a sostenerla y mantenerte activo!”, agregó Huang.</p> <p>Greenberg recordó que iba a la escuela caminando o en bicicleta con amigos cuando era joven.</p> <p>“Ahora tenemos miedo de dejar que nuestros hijos caminen solos por la calle”, destacó Greenberg. “Ya no ves a niños jugando en la calle. Entonces los padres tienen que encontrar la forma de involucrar a sus hijos en otras actividades y que las compartan con otras personas”.</p> <p>Greenberg sugiere el autobús escolar a pie. Se trata de un grupo de niños que va caminando a la escuela con, al menos, un adulto. Así de simple como suena. Solo tendrán que turnarse entre las familias para acompañar a sus hijos.</p> <p>Al incluir a otra familia en tu caminata diaria a la escuela, te sentirás más motivado. Aquí podrás encontrar una guía para imprimir sobre este “autobús”.</p> <p>“Se trata de pequeños cambios y educación. Nuestros hijos lo están entendiendo. Los usamos como los agentes del cambio. Ellos son quienes incentivan a sus padres. Han cambiado sus estilos de vida”, comentó Greenberg.</p> <p>Cuando los padres priorizan la actividad física, priorizan la educación integral. “Escuela, salud, cuerpo, mente, creatividad. Todo está conectado”, concluyó Greenberg.</p>
CATHTML F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7,03D350EA-5056-9A4B-6CECAB5B32AA4CD1,F45802A1-5056-9A4B-6C56F70E0E456FC4
CMLABEL Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-01-17 12:29:12.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:28:25.89
DESCRIPTION Research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is very important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd be interested in this article from Parent Toolkit on educating the whole child, physically and academically.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is very important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 7B2EDE80-7F18-11E5-B4220050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F45343BF-5056-9A4B-6C6E29933241363D
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F46A46CF-5056-9A4B-6C92B61B320C3DD7
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2015-11-02 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Educating Your Child: Physically and Academically
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER <p><em>60 minutes a day. </em>That is what the current <a href="http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/">Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans</a> recommend as a minimum for daily physical activity. Only about half of youth in the United States are getting that. Promoting physical activity can be a daunting task for some parents. But research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is extremely important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.</p>
SHORTTEASERES 60 minutos por día. Ese es el tiempo mínimo que recomienda Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans para actividad física diaria.
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Research suggests that getting your child moving at an early age is extremely important, not only for preventing childhood obesity, but for academic performance.
TEASERES 60 minutos por día. Ese es el tiempo mínimo que recomienda Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans para actividad física diaria.
TEASERIMAGE D6F2D200-236B-11E7-A4840050569A4B6C
TITLE Educating the Whole Child: Physical Activity and Academic Performance
TITLEES Educación integral: actividad física y rendimiento académico
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Helpful advice on educating the whole child, physically and academically via @EducationNation:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

mom daughter hug

Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image

struct
BITLYLINK http://bit.ly/1yktQPD
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>It seems everywhere you look there’s a message about bodies. Whether it’s song lyrics talking about “big booty” or the models in fashion magazines, messages and images about the definition of beauty are all around us. And it’s not just adults who are hearing it. Every day your child, daughter or son, is exposed to similar messages. We all want our children to grow up with a healthy view of themselves, both in appearance and self-worth. But how can you, as a parent, compete with all the messages your child hears outside home? We talked to some of our Parent Toolkit experts to get their advice on how you can be a positive influence on your child’s body image, whether your child is male or female, underweight, overweight or average.</p> <p><a href="http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318">Learn more about ways you can nurture your child's social and emotional well-being</a>.</p> <p>You can begin to combat the external messages by talking about body image from an early age. Kansas City-based pediatrician Dr. Natasha Burgert recommends you start by asking them “What is pretty?” and “What is handsome?” Then, you can give them your definitions for the words.</p> <blockquote>“Based on what they say, you have lots of discussions and opportunities to reframe positive body image,” says Dr. Burgert. “If they describe a real person you can say ‘yes, Daddy is handsome, but isn’t he also kind? He takes care of our family, that’s what makes him handsome to me.’”</blockquote> <p>If your child describes a fictional character, point out qualities like bravery or courage that the character shows rather than just external qualities. With small conversations like these started at an early age, you can help frame how your child views beauty.</p> <p>Overwhelmingly, our experts agree that the number one thing you can do to instill a positive body image for your child is to pay close attention to what you are saying. Yes, you. As parents and caregivers, your child takes cues from you from the time they’re young children to the time they’re entering adulthood, even if at that point they don’t admit it.</p> <p>“I think we confuse attention with influence. Even though a middle schooler doesn’t give you attention, it doesn’t mean you don’t have influence,” says Dr. Burgert. “If mom is looking in the mirror and saying ‘I’m too fat,’ the kids will do that too.”</p> <p>According to the Centers for Disease Control survey of high school students, 19 percent of girls said they didn’t eat for 24 hours or more in order to lose weight or to keep from gaining weight. For boys, that number is 7 percent.</p> <p>Parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba recommends keeping an eye on your child’s online behaviors, from what photo she decides to post on social media to the websites she’s visiting.</p> <blockquote>“We often overlook their Instagram or Facebook account,” Dr. Borba says. “I don’t think parents are aware of what they’re looking at.”</blockquote> <p>Some adolescents visit pro-ana (pro-anorexia) or pro-mia (pro-bulimia) websites to find tips and support to drive disordered eating. As research for this article, our team did a search on Instagram with the hash tag #ana, #mia and #thinspo (for thin inspiration). The results were telling. Page after page revealed images of extremely thin women and girls. Some were images of models, while others were selfies. One even asked for “likes” on the page, and said for each “like” she received, she wouldn’t eat for 4 hours.</p> <p>So what should you say if you notice your child may be losing weight or seems to have a different approach at the dinner table than before? School counselor Dr. Shari Sevier recommends coming from a place of concern and pointing out what you’ve noticed as a way to get the conversation going. Start with “I’ve noticed that you’ve…”</p> <blockquote>“Tell them about your concern, and then go to the doctor,” says Dr. Sevier. “With eating disorders you need a multiple team approach and need professionals.”</blockquote> <p>“Having an unhealthy body image is irregardless of weight,” Dr. Burgert points out. “It’s more conceptual and more broad about a healthy body image and self-esteem.”</p> <p>And Dr. Burgert has a point. While research shows as many as 10 in 100 young women in the United States have an eating disorder, more than one in three children and adolescents were overweight or obese in 2012. Children who are overweight from a young age have a higher risk for developing chronic diseases like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It can be a hard conversation to start, as becoming obese doesn’t happen overnight. Pounds get put on over the course of weeks, months, and even years, but the best approach is to not single out an overweight child.</p> <blockquote>“My most successful families are the ones who took this on as a family issue,” says Dr. Burgert. “We’re not making you run on the treadmill while we all sit on the couch and eat Cheetos. We’re all going to eat healthy and go on walks together. It’s not a negotiation, it’s a whole family change.”</blockquote> <p>In order to get the whole family involved, Dr. Borba recommends getting your kids involved in food preparation, grocery shopping, and cooking. You can even use a “green, yellow, red” way to categorize foods for your family. Green means “go” - these include vegetables and fruits essentially foods that are O.K. to eat all the time. Yellow are the “slow down” foods, or foods that can be eaten sometimes but not all the time, like refined grains. Red foods should be eaten very infrequently, like a piece of cake once a week.</p> <blockquote>“Go ahead and print out recipes that would fall into the green or yellow category and make your own cookbook,” Dr. Borba says. Choose those recipes with your children and have them help you shop and prepare the meal so they are invested as well.</blockquote> <p>It’s not always an easy thing to do, but your influence on your child can be the key to a healthy body image.</p> <p>“So many of us as adults have so many emotions about our own body image and it’s hard not to translate that on,” says Dr. Burgert. “Talk about how proud you are of your accomplishments, like ‘I read really well’ or ‘I helped that person,’ rather than ‘I look great.’ You need to start with you.”</p> <p><em>This is the third post in our week-long series — Tough Talks— where we’ve surveyed a handful of our Parent Toolkit experts to see what they recommend for parents to make tough conversations go more smoothly. Tomorrow we’ll tackle the topic of mental health.</em></p> <p><em>If you or someone you know needs help or would like more information about the issue, please call the National Eating Disorders Hotline at 1-800-931-2237 or visit </em><a href="http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/"><em>http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/</em></a><em>.</em></p>
BODYES <p>En todas partes vemos mensajes directamente relacionados con el cuerpo. Ya sea en la letra de una canción que habla sobre “traseros grandes”, o con las modelos en las revistas de moda, estamos rodeados de mensajes e imágenes que “definen” lo que es la belleza. Y no solo los adultos somos bombardeados con estos mensajes, nuestros hijos e hijas también están expuestos a esto a diario. Todos queremos que nuestros hijos crezcan con una imagen positiva de sí mismos, tanto en apariencia como en autoestima. Pero como padres, ¿cómo podemos luchar contra todos estos mensajes que atacan a nuestros hijos cuando no están en casa? Consultamos con nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones sobre cómo podemos influir de manera positiva en la imagen corporal de nuestros hijos, ya sean varones, mujeres, con bajo peso, con sobrepeso o con peso promedio.</p> <p>Conoce más formas en las que puedes contribuir al bienestar social y emocional de tus hijos.</p> <p>Para iniciar el combate contra esta invasión de mensajes, debes hablar con tus hijos sobre la imagen corporal desde muy temprana edad. La Dra. Natasha Burgert, pediatra de Kansas City, nos recomienda hacerles estas preguntas: “¿qué significa ser linda?” o “¿qué significa ser guapo?”, y luego tú les explicas lo que significan para ti.</p> <blockquote>“Basándote en sus respuestas podrás charlar con ellos sobre el tema y generarás el espacio para reencuadrar su imagen corporal”, nos cuenta la Dra. Burgert. “Si describen a una persona real puedes decirles “Sí, papá es guapo, pero también es amable, ¿verdad? Cuida de nuestra familia y, para mí, eso también significa ser una persona guapa”.</blockquote> <p>Si tu hijo describe a un personaje de ficción, señala características como el coraje o la valentía, en lugar de solo prestar atención a sus características físicas. Si desde temprana edad tienes este tipo de charlas con tus hijos, podrás ayudar a formar el concepto que tengan de belleza.</p> <p>Nuestros expertos acuerdan, en forma unánime, que lo mejor que puedes hacer para que tu hijo tenga una imagen corporal positiva es prestar mucha atención a lo que dices. Sí, a lo que tú dices. Los hijos forman sus opiniones teniendo en cuenta lo que dicen sus padres y cuidadores, desde que son pequeños hasta que son adultos, aun cuando en esa etapa de la vida no lo admitan.</p> <p>“Creo que confundimos el prestar atención con la influencia. Que un alumno de escuela intermedia no te preste atención no significa que no tengas influencia sobre él”, dice la Dra. Burgert. “Si la mamá se mira al espejo y dice ‘Estoy muy gorda’, los hijos también lo harán”.</p> <p>Según una encuesta entre estudiantes de escuela secundaria realizada por los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades, el 19% de las mujeres respondieron que habían pasado 24 horas o más sin comer para bajar de peso o para evitar engordar. Entre los varones, la cifra fue del 7%.</p> <p>La Dra. Michele Borba, experta en crianza, recomienda estar atentos a la conducta en línea de tu hija, desde la foto que elige publicar en su perfil de redes sociales hasta los sitios web que visita.</p> <blockquote>“Muchas veces no damos importancia a sus cuentas de Facebook o Instagram”, explica la Dra. Borba. “Creo que los padres no saben muy bien qué es lo que están mirando”.</blockquote> <p>Algunos adolescentes visitan sitios web Pro-Ana (a favor de la anorexia) o Pro-Mia (a favor de la bulimia) para buscar consejos y ayuda para seguir un estilo de vida que promueve estos trastornos alimenticios. En el curso de la investigación para este artículo, nuestro equipo hizo una búsqueda en Instagram con las etiquetas #ana, #mia y #thinspo (inspiración para ser delgado), y los resultados fueron reveladores. Páginas y páginas con imágenes de mujeres y adolescentes extremadamente delgadas. Algunas eran fotos de modelos y otras eran selfies. Incluso había una muchacha que pedía que le dieran “me gusta” a su foto, y por cada uno que recibiera no iba a comer nada durante 4 horas.</p> <p>Entonces, ¿qué deberías hacer si notas que tu hijo baja de peso o a la hora de la cena se comporta de manera distinta a la que era habitual? La consejera escolar, Dra. Shari Sevier, recomienda abordar el tema desde la preocupación, mencionando lo que has notado. Puedes iniciar la conversación diciendo “He notado que...”</p> <blockquote>“Cuéntale qué es lo que te preocupa, y luego visiten al médico”, aconseja la Dra. Sevier. “En el caso de los trastornos alimenticios se necesita el trabajo multidisciplinario de un equipo de profesionales”...Una imagen corporal poco saludable no está relacionada únicamente con el peso”, señala la Dra. Burgert. “El tema es más amplio y conceptual, incluye una imagen corporal saludable y la autoestima”.</blockquote> <p>Y aquí es donde la Dra. Burgert da en la tecla. Si bien las investigaciones demuestran que, en los Estados Unidos, 10 de cada 100 mujeres jóvenes padecen de trastornos alimenticios, en 2012 más de uno cada tres niños y adolescentes tenían sobrepeso o eran obesos. Los niños con sobrepeso desde temprana edad corren mayor riesgo de desarrollar enfermedades crónicas, como la diabetes tipo 2 o enfermedades cardíacas. Es un tema difícil de tratar, pero la obesidad no ocurre de la noche a la mañana. Los kilos se acumulan con el paso de las semanas, los meses e, incluso, los años. Pero el mejor enfoque es no señalar o dar un trato especial a un niño obeso.</p> <blockquote>“Las familias más exitosas son aquellas que tratan este tema como un problema familiar”, dice la Dra. Burgert. “No te vamos a obligar a usar la cinta para correr mientras nosotros nos sentamos en el sofá y comemos Cheetos. Todos vamos a comer de manera más saludable y saldremos a hacer ejercicio juntos. No es una negociación, es un cambio para toda la familia”.</blockquote> <p>Para que toda la familia se involucre, la Dra. Borba recomienda que los niños participen en la preparación de los alimentos, en las compras y en la cocina. También puedes usar un sistema de clasificación de los alimentos por colores: verde, amarillo y rojo. El verde significa “vía libre”, que incluye las frutas y las verduras. Básicamente, los alimentos que se pueden comer en cualquier momento. El amarillo son los alimentos para “tomar con calma”, aquellos alimentos que podemos comer a veces pero no siempre, como por ejemplo las harinas refinadas. Los alimentos rojos son aquellos que solo están permitidos en ocasiones especiales, como por ejemplo una porción de pastel una vez por semana.</p> <blockquote>“Busca e imprime recetas que puedas clasificar como verdes o amarillas y arma tu propio libro de cocina”, aconseja la Dra. Borba. Elije las recetas con tus hijos y permíteles ayudarte a hacer las compras y preparar la comida, para que ellos también se involucren.</blockquote> <p>No siempre es fácil, pero tu influencia en tus hijos puede ser fundamental para una imagen corporal saludable.</p> <p>“Como adultos, muchos de nosotros tenemos sentimientos tan profundos sobre nuestra propia imagen corporal que es imposible no trasladarlos a otros”, dice la Dra. Burgert. “Cuando estés frente al espejo, en vez de decirte ‘Me veo genial’, intenta elogiar tus logros: ‘puedo leer muy bien’ o ‘logré ayudar a alguien’. Tienes que comenzar contigo”.</p> <p><em>Esta es la tercera publicación de nuestra serie semanal, Charlas difíciles, donde consultamos a nuestros expertos de Parent Toolkit para pedirles sus recomendaciones para que los padres puedan hablar en forma más cómoda sobre estos temas espinosos. Mañana trataremos el tema de la salud mental.</em></p> <p><em>Si tú o alguien que conoces necesita ayuda, o deseas obtener más información sobre el tema, comunícate con la línea nacional de ayuda para trastornos de la alimentación al 1-800-931-2237 o visita <a href="http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/.">http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/.</a></em></p>
CATHTML F4514409-5056-9A4B-6C89E3D8DED63F67,30C8FC3F-5056-9A4B-6C0C8519CF122153,30CDE33F-5056-9A4B-6CAD725348C99DA0,30CFEF78-5056-9A4B-6C1229225A95F79C,30D55DC4-5056-9A4B-6CCCCC73D1CCC6FE,30D653DF-5056-9A4B-6CC326FD61B523B9,30D71B48-5056-9A4B-6C663681555233E6,30D820E1-5056-9A4B-6CC26F4BFE048599,F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13,5B429C0D-5056-9A4B-6C7BA6FE30C4DF95,5B474F01-5056-9A4B-6C28E35784A7C0B9,5B4878EF-5056-9A4B-6CDFFFEEE9286885,F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,5B495C7E-5056-9A4B-6CC60CB1182634EF,5B4BF517-5056-9A4B-6CB7F430AC221157,5B4CAFA1-5056-9A4B-6C68D39EDF81B7C7,5B4D820F-5056-9A4B-6CE961B294CD4D71,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B7A1F1E-5056-9A4B-6C21F1E302C85D08,03CD890A-5056-9A4B-6CDA927467EB36F5
CMLABEL Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED [empty string]
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:43:58.78
DESCRIPTION Every day children are exposed to messages about how they are supposed to look. Here's advice on how to talk to them about it.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT I thought you'd like this article from Parent Toolkit about having a positive influence on your child's body image:
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Every day children are exposed to messages about how they are supposed to look. Here's advice on how to talk to them about it.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
LABEL Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID D5B127A0-5610-11E4-ADC90050569A5318
OWNEDBY [empty string]
PCOHORT F4548C06-5056-9A4B-6C891EB388229A13
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B7A1F1E-5056-9A4B-6C21F1E302C85D08
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2014-10-22 10:30:00.0
SEOTITLE How to Positively Influence Your Child’s Body Image
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES Cómo influir de manera positiva en la imagen corporal de tu hijo
SOCIALTITLE How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER It seems everywhere you look there’s a message about bodies. We talked to some of our Parent Toolkit experts to get their advice on how you can be a positive influence on your child’s body image, whether your child is male or female, underweight, overweight or average.
TEASERES En todas partes vemos mensajes directamente relacionados con el cuerpo.
TEASERIMAGE 59726710-1D48-11E7-A4000050569A4B6C
TITLE Tough Talks: How to Have a Positive Influence on Your Child’s Body Image
TITLEES Charlas difíciles: cómo influir de manera positiva en la imagen corporal de tu hijo
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Every day children are exposed to messages about how they are supposed to look. Here's how to talk to them about it.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmConversationStarterArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array [empty]

Featured Experts