Dr. Nicole Green

Executive Director of Counseling and Psychological Services
University of California Los Angeles

Expert: Nicole Green

Dr. Nicole Green is executive director of Counseling and Psychological Services and the Campus Assault Resources and Education Program at UCLA, which serves UCLA undergraduate and graduate students.

In addition, she is chair of the Organization of California Counseling Directors in Higher Education. Green holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from UCLA, a master’s of education degree from Harvard University, and a PhD in counselling psychology from the University of Southern California.

Her main areas of interest include academic success among students of color, African American family issues, intimate partner violence and women’s issues.

More From This Expert

woman looking skyward

Building Assertiveness in Young Adults

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Navigating the various ups and downs of life is a big part of getting older, and navigating these situations while staying true to oneself takes practice and skill. As your young adult moves through their social and professional lives, practicing assertiveness becomes more and more important when working through complicated situations and developing their own <a href="/advice-editorial/young-adult-identity-development-a-parent-s-guide">identity</a>. You can’t be there to stand up for your kid in every situation, nor should you. Your young adult must learn to stand up for him or herself. But there are ways you can help to support them in building their assertiveness.</p> <h4>What is assertiveness?</h4> <p>Assertiveness is a communication skill that can be learned. Using assertive verbal and body language and tone of voice shows a type of confidence that clearly expresses one’s wants, needs, feelings, and values without hurting or dismissing others. Being assertive helps us in communicating with others while being socially aware of our interactions. “It enables us to set personal boundaries about what we are, what we value, and what is unacceptable to us,” education consultant Jennifer Miller says. It is most useful to be assertive in situations involving conflict, but it is also helpful in many other types of scenarios.</p> <h4>Why is it important for my young adult?</h4> <p>Your young adult may have already practiced assertiveness when dealing with peers as a teen. Peer pressure, bullying, bossy friends; these social challenges were all building blocks for your kids as they grew more socially aware. Assertiveness only becomes more important as they get older. Supporting your young adult in building assertiveness will help them identify their social strengths, build confidence, advocate for themselves, and solidify their identity.</p> <p> _insertContent=F00A3140-1B21-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C_</p> <p>Assertiveness is important for both social and professional situations. After graduating high school, teens face many unique changes and challenges. Peer pressure doesn’t go away in  college or work settings. Being assertive can help them keep a sense of self in their social interactions like forming new friendships, starting their career, and navigating different kinds of relationships.</p> <h4>So…how do I help my young adult become more assertive? <strong>Talk about values.</strong></h4> <p>Integrity and ethics are the foundation of assertiveness. As a family, you may have had these conversations in the past, or you may not have. But either way, author and parenting expert Ana Homayoun says, “Don’t assume your kids automatically know your family values. Ongoing conversations are key—it’s never too late to start.” Parent Toolkit student advisor Samia, a current senior in high school, said the best advice her parents ever gave her was “just to be true to yourself….Be real with yourself and have those hard conversations.” Ask your young adult what they value in life; have these values shifted or changed at all over the years? What do you expect of others when you interact with them? How do you interact with someone who has different values than you? “It is important to encourage young adults to reflect and think about what is important to them and what qualities they want to focus on in their lives,” Homayoun says. “I always ask students to identify where and when they feel more energized versus most drained? Encouraging teens and young adults to identify their own values can naturally give them a sense of accomplishment in the little things they do to work towards those values in everyday living.”</p> <p>Reflect with your kid about whether or not both of your daily choices reflect your values. Making choices is part of assertiveness. Are they going to prioritize hard work, friend loyalty, or political activism? Highlight examples of your own encounters with ethical dilemmas or interacting with people who have different values than you do. For example, you may care a lot about the environment, but find that your apartment building does not recycle. Or you have a coworker who differs politically and continuously makes comments to you about it at work. Some of these situations may cause young adults to question what they stand for and how they want to live. “They could be asking questions of themselves for the first time regarding the values they feel are most important because of their newfound independence,” Miller says. During this time, young adults have to learn to be comfortable with what they are standing for. “There has to be a balance, where you are comfortable with your position but also be able to hear what other people have to say,” licensed mental health counselor Janine Halloran says. When your young adult knows what they stand for, they are much more ready and confident to stand up for themselves.</p> <p><strong>Point out when your young adult is assertive.</strong></p> <p>Start by highlighting your young adult’s social strengths, which is where their assertiveness will come out. They may be a generous and loyal friend, or kind to all people and good at listening. Call out these strengths and remind your young adult that these traits are important to hold on to, regardless of the situation.</p> <p>“It is tough for young adults who are in the process of developing their own identity and sense of self,” Homayoun says. “It can be difficult to be assertive for one point of view or belief system because their own values and beliefs may be shifting and they might not have that view a year from now.” For parents, this is why it's a good time to explain what assertion means. In instances where your kid remains true to himself or herself, point it out! Assertion can be something as small as being kind to someone you do not like or telling your friend that you don’t want to go out on a Friday night because you need some time alone.</p> <p>You may also notice that your young adult is assertive toward you more often than others. “Instead of receiving ’push back‘ assertions as an invitation to engage in a power struggle, you can appreciate their ability to assert their point of view and know that it can be used as a critical tool in preserving their boundaries and safety among peers,” Miller says. It’s likely that they are very comfortable being themselves around you. Point this out and encourage your young adult to use this same kind of tone and confidence when communicating with peers or other adults. </p> <p><strong>Be responsive to their assertions.</strong></p> <p>Take your young adult seriously when they assert themselves. You may not agree with them about everything, but you should acknowledge that they are expressing their thoughts or values. Use this as a time to talk and get to know what your young adult is thinking and feeling. The years after they leave home are big for forming their identity, and sometimes this may look very different than your own expectations for your kid. Do not disregard the very real feelings and opinions they have at this time. If you give them a supportive environment to assert themselves in, they are much more likely to come to you when issues arise.</p> <p>If you do disagree, talk with them about why and assert yourself and your opinions. Experts say the best way to teach your kid anything is to model it. Your young adult is susceptible to this as well, even if they are no longer living with you. Be respectfully assertive and clearly state your opinions and thoughts when you interact with others, including your kid. If your kid says something you fundamentally disagree with, tell them and explain why you disagree in a respectful way. “If they slip into disrespectful language, you might respond in ways that show them how they can disagree using respectful language,” Miller says. Do not tell them they are wrong or yell at them; this does not model assertiveness and could push them away. When they see how you approach conflict, especially towards them, they are more likely to imitate the behavior. This is good practice for them as well in a safe and loving environment, because they know you will be there for them no matter what.</p> <p><strong>Don’t solve their problems, but reflect with them.</strong></p> <p>As your kid gets older, your role as a parent shifts towards being more supportive and less directive. When they come to you with problems, help them establish their own assertiveness by reflecting on the experience with them and asking them questions. Advise, do not tell. Ask open-ended questions like: How did that make you feel? What could you have said when your friend got mad at you? You can’t tell them how to be assertive, but you can encourage them to think about how different situations come across in social interactions.</p> <p>Being assertive can be a challenging skill to grasp, especially for those who do not like conflict. But it is the foundation of social awareness and will help your young adult in all of their social interactions. It will also help them figure out who they are and what they value in this crazy thing called life. As the saying goes, “if you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.”</p> <p> </p>
BODYES <p>Atravesar los diversos altibajos de la vida es una parte importante del crecimiento, y atravesar estas situaciones mientras se es fiel a uno mismo requiere de práctica y habilidad. A medida que tu hijo avanza en su vida social y profesional, practicar la asertividad se vuelve cada vez más importante cuando resuelve situaciones complicadas y desarrolla su propia <a href="/advice-editorial/young-adult-identity-development-a-parent-s-guide">identidad</a>. No puedes estar al lado de tu hijo para defenderlo en cada situación, y tampoco deberías hacerlo. Tu hijo, como adulto joven, debe aprender a defenderse solo. Pero hay maneras en que puedes ayudarlo a desarrollar la asertividad.</p> <h4>¿Qué es la asertividad?</h4> <p>La asertividad es una habilidad comunicacional que puede aprenderse. Utilizar un lenguaje verbal y corporal y un tono de voz asertivos muestra un tipo de confianza que expresa claramente los deseos, necesidades, sentimientos y valores de uno sin herir ni desestimar a los demás. Ser asertivos nos ayuda a comunicarnos con los demás mientras somos socialmente conscientes de nuestras interacciones. “Nos permite poner límites personales respecto de lo que somos, lo que valoramos y lo que es inaceptable para nosotros”, dice la consultora en educación Jennifer Miller. Es sumamente útil ser asertivo en situaciones que involucran conflicto, pero también es útil en muchos otros tipos de escenarios.</p> <h4>¿Por qué esto es importante para mi hijo como adulto joven?</h4> <p>Es posible que tu hijo ya haya ejercido la asertividad al tratar con pares durante la adolescencia. Presión del grupo de pares, hostigamiento y amigos mandones: estos desafíos sociales fueron piezas fundamentales para tu hijo a medida que fue tomando más conciencia del aspecto social. La asertividad se vuelve más importante cuando tu hijo crece. Apoyarlo para que desarrolle asertividad lo ayudará a identificar sus fortalezas sociales, a generar confianza, defenderse y a reafirmar su identidad.</p> <p> _insertContent=F00A3140-1B21-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C_</p> <p>La asertividad es importante para situaciones tanto sociales como profesionales. Después de graduarse de la escuela secundaria, los adolescentes se enfrentan a muchos cambios y desafíos únicos. La presión del grupo de pares no desaparece en los ámbitos universitarios o laborales. Ser asertivo puede ayudarlos a mantener un sentido del yo en sus interacciones sociales así como a entablar nuevas amistades, comenzar su carrera profesional y vivir diferentes tipos de relaciones.</p> <h4>Entonces… ¿cómo ayudo a mi hijo a ser más asertivo? <strong>Habla sobre los valores.</strong></h4> <p>La integridad y la ética son la base de la asertividad. Como familia, es posible que hayan mantenido estas conversaciones en el pasado, o tal vez no lo hayan hecho. Cualquiera sea el caso, la autora y experta en paternidad Ana Homayoun dice: “No supongas que tu hijo conoce automáticamente los valores de tu familia. Las conversaciones continuas son claves: nunca es demasiado tarde para comenzar”. La asesora estudiantil de Parent Toolkit Samia, actualmente en el último año de la escuela secundaria, dijo que el mejor consejo que le han dado sus padres fue: “simplemente sé fiel a ti misma… Sé real contigo misma y mantén esas conversaciones difíciles”. Pregúntale a tu hijo qué valora en la vida; ¿se han modificado o cambiado esos valores con los años? ¿Qué esperas de los demás cuando interactúas con ellos? ¿Cómo interactúas con alguien que tiene valores diferentes de los tuyos? “Es importante alentar a los adultos jóvenes a reflexionar y pensar sobre lo que es importante para ellos y en qué cualidades quieren concentrarse en sus vidas”, señala Homayoun. “Siempre les pido a los estudiantes que identifiquen con qué cosas y en qué situaciones se sienten más animados, en lugar de lo que los agota. Alentar a los adolescentes y adultos jóvenes a identificar sus propios valores puede darles naturalmente un sentido de logro en las pequeñas cosas que hacen para trabajar en pos de esos valores en la vida diaria”.</p> <p>Reflexiona con tu hijo sobre si sus elecciones diarias reflejan o no sus valores. Hacer elecciones es parte de la asertividad. ¿Va a priorizar el trabajo arduo, la lealtad en la amistad o el activismo político? Destaca ejemplos de tus propios enfrentamientos con dilemas éticos o interacciones con personas que tienen valores diferentes de los tuyos. Por ejemplo, es posible que te preocupe mucho el medioambiente, pero te encuentres con que tu edificio no se ocupa del reciclaje. O puedes tener un compañero de trabajo que tiene una visión política diferente y continuamente te hace comentarios al respecto en el trabajo. Algunas de estas situaciones pueden hacer que los adultos jóvenes se cuestionen qué defienden y cómo quieren vivir. “Podrían hacerse preguntas por primera vez respecto de los valores que sienten como más importantes debido a su independencia recién descubierta”, dice Miller. Durante esta época, los adultos jóvenes tienen que aprender a estar más cómodos con lo que defienden. “Debe haber un equilibrio, en el que estés cómodo con tu postura, pero también puedas escuchar lo que otras personas tienen para decir”, dice Janine Halloran, asesora en salud mental con licencia. Cuando tu hijo conoce lo que defiende, está mucho más preparado y confiado para defenderse a sí mismo.</p> <h4>Señala las oportunidades en que tu hijo es asertivo.</h4> <p>Comienza destacando las fortalezas sociales de tu hijo, que es de donde surgirá su asertividad. Es posible que sea un amigo generoso y leal, o amable con todas las personas y bueno para escuchar. Resalta estas fortalezas y recuérdale a tu hijo que es importante aferrarse a estas características, independientemente de la situación.</p> <p>“Es difícil para los adultos jóvenes que están atravesando el proceso de desarrollar su propia identidad y sentido del yo”, dice Homayoun. “Puede ser difícil ser asertivo en pos de un punto de vista o sistema de convicciones porque sus propios valores y convicciones pueden estar cambiando y podrían no tener esa opinión dentro de un año”. Para los padres, es por este motivo que es un buen momento para explicarles lo que significa la asertividad. En las ocasiones en que tu hijo se mantenga fiel a sí mismo, ¡señálalo! Ser asertivo puede ser algo tan pequeño como ser amable con alguien que no te agrada o decirle a tu amigo que no quieres salir un viernes por la noche porque necesitas pasar tiempo en soledad.</p> <p>Es posible que notes que tu hijo es asertivo hacia ti más a menudo que con los demás. “En lugar de recibir este tipo de ‘enfrentamiento’ como una invitación a entablar una lucha de poder, puedes apreciar su capacidad para hacer valer su punto de vista y saber que puede utilizarse como una herramienta crítica para preservar sus límites y seguridad entre pares”, comenta Miller. Es probable que le resulte muy cómodo ser sí mismo cuando está contigo. Señala esto y alienta a tu hijo a usar este mismo tipo de tono y confianza cuando se comunica con pares o con otros adultos.</p> <h4>Sé receptivo a sus actos de asertividad.</h4> <p>Toma en serio a tu hijo cuando se hace valer. Es posible que no estés de acuerdo con él sobre todo, pero deberías reconocer que está expresando sus pensamientos o valores. Aprovecha esto como una oportunidad para hablar y conocer lo que tu hijo piensa y siente. Los años posteriories a que deja la casa son importantes para formar su identidad , y a veces esto puede ser muy diferente de las expectativas que tienes para tu hijo. No ignores los verdaderos sentimientos y opiniones que tiene en este momento. Si le das un entorno de apoyo para hacerse valer, es mucho más probable que recurra a ti cuando surjan problemas.</p> <p>Si no estás de acuerdo, habla con él sobre el por qué, y hazte valer y haz valer tus opiniones. Los expertos dicen que la mejor manera de enseñarle a tu hijo algo es dar el ejemplo. Tu hijo es susceptible a todo esto también, incluso si ya no vive contigo. Sé asertivo de manera respetuosa y presenta con claridad tus opiniones y pensamientos cuando interactúas con los demás, incluido tu hijo. Si tu hijo dice algo con lo que fundamentalmente no estás de acuerdo, díselo y explícale de un modo respetuoso por qué no estás de acuerdo. “Si emplea lenguaje irrespetuoso, podrías responder de un modo que le demuestre cómo mostrarse en desacuerdo usando lenguaje respetuoso”, señala Miller. No le digas que está equivocado ni le grites; esto no da el ejemplo de asertividad y podría alejarlo. Cuando vea cómo abordas el conflicto, especialmente hacia él, es más probable que imite el comportamiento. Esta es una buena práctica para tu hijo, en un entorno seguro y de cariño, porque sabe que podrá contar contigo pase lo que pase.</p> <h4>No resuelvas sus problemas, pero reflexiona con él.</h4> <p>A medida que tu hijo crece, tu rol como padre cambia hacia un rol de mayor apoyo y menos órdenes. Cuando recurre a ti con un problema, ayúdalo a establecer su propia asertividad reflexionando sobre la experiencia con él y haciéndole preguntas. Dale consejos, no indicaciones. Haz preguntas abiertas como: ¿Cómo te hace sentir eso? ¿Qué podrías haber dicho cuando tu amigo se enojó contigo? No puedes decirle cómo ser asertivo, pero puedes alentarlo a pensar sobre cómo surgen las diferentes situaciones en las interacciones sociales.</p> <p>Ser asertivo puede ser una habilidad difícil de adquirir, especialmente para quienes no gustan del conflicto. Pero esta es la base de la conciencia social y ayudará a tu hijo en todas sus interacciones sociales. También le ayudará a averiguar quién es y lo que valora en esta locura llamada vida. Como dice el dicho: “el que no tiene convicciones firmes podrá creer cualquier cosa”.</p>
CATHTML F45596C8-5056-9A4B-6C257F0913B8D02A,F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC,F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB,F465E739-5056-9A4B-6C7B0F91A74DF204,2B71E811-5056-9A4B-6C95674E78ACA0A9
CMLABEL Building Assertiveness in Young Adults
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-13 17:59:39.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:30:22.577
DESCRIPTION Assertiveness is an important social skill that can be helpful in many types of scenarios. Learn more about assertiveness in your young adult.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Assertiveness is an important social skill that can be helpful in many types of scenarios. Learn more about assertiveness in your young adult, from Parent Toolkit.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Assertiveness is an important social skill that can be helpful in many types of scenarios. Learn more about assertiveness in your young adult.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Building Assertiveness in Young Adults
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID 7D414E50-2094-11E7-8E0E0050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC F464A506-5056-9A4B-6CA2EA88C73DA1EB
PTOPIC F4592C49-5056-9A4B-6CEF3C365B7E09FC
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-13 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Building Assertiveness in Young Adults
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Building Assertiveness in Young Adults
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER It will help them figure out who they are and what they value in this crazy thing called life.
TEASERES Le ayudará a averiguar quién es y lo que valora en esta locura llamada vida.
TEASERIMAGE 44AF6810-22C4-11E7-908B0050569A4B6C
TITLE Building Assertiveness in Young Adults
TITLEES Desarrollar la asertividad en los adultos jóvenes
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Assertiveness is an important skill that can be helpful in many types of scenarios. Learn more via @EducationNation:
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array
1 F00A3140-1B21-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 2BA3A1C0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
2 133ADA40-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C
3 EDC09719-C060-CE41-C6848207BB3C040D
4 496F0AF0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C

Mom arm around daughter

Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents

struct
BITLYLINK [empty string]
BITLYLINKES [empty string]
BODY <p>Transitions are often a challenging time for many families. Whether it’s going to middle school, going into high school, going to college, or entering the workforce full-time, any major life change comes with mixed emotions. You may be excited one minute and scared or stressed the next. That’s completely normal, and normal for your kids, too. When young adults leave high school or college, the future can seem overwhelming.</p> <p>As a parent, your role in your kids’ lives change as they grow up, but maintaining an open line of communication can be beneficial for everyone.  One of those benefits is on mental health. Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, and an open dialogue, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.</p> <p><strong>What Is “Normal?”</strong></p> <p>Clinical psychologist Dr. Bobbi Wegner has parents who often come to her with concerns about their student’s transition into or out of college. She says that many kids go through adjustment issues, and it’s completely normal. But often young adults and their parents aren’t expecting these feelings to come up, so when they do, there is a heightened sense of worry.</p> <p>“Anxiety and depression is the common cold of mental health, but people don’t talk a lot about it,” Wegner says. “As a parent, a part of helping is normalizing anxiety, and feeling low or depression can be a ‘normal’ part of the experience.”</p> <p>“Normal” difficulties during transition times include increased anxiety, depression, and relationship issues. Young adults can have a hard time making new friends in the work place or at school and start to feel lonely or isolated. Increased workload and responsibilities can contribute to stress. Raising their awareness that those feelings are valid can go a long way.</p> <p><strong>Be Prepared</strong></p> <p>UCLA’s Executive Director of Counseling and Psychological Services Dr. Nicole Presley Green’s biggest advice to parents is to be proactive before there is a problem. Knowing what resources are available on campus, like student counseling centers, is a great step to being prepared. Similarly, making sure your young adult knows about their insurance information can help prepare them should they need to seek care at any point.</p> <p><strong>Related:</strong> <a href="/advice-tips/physical-health-and-young-adults-a-parent-s-guide">Guide to Young Adult Health Care</a></p> <p>Being prepared also means maintaining an open line of communication between you and your young adult. That doesn’t mean you have to call them every few hours, but simply letting them know they can call you or reach out whenever they need to. Keep in mind that you’ve been with your kid for most of their life; you know what is normal for them.</p> <p>“It’s a really challenging time for parents. They don’t know how much to let them flourish and flounder, and how much to get involved,” Dr. Green says. “But they do know when their kid is really reaching a point where they need help.”</p> <p><strong>Know the Red Flags</strong></p> <p>As a parent, hearing that it’s “normal” might not help when you’re worried whether or not your kid is able to handle their new world. Fortunately, there are ways for you to help identify whether or not something more serious is going on.</p> <p>Dr. Wegner recommends keeping an eye out for any major changes in behavior in three categories she calls the “holy trilogy of health”:sleeping, eating, and energy. Any major shift in any of those areas (eating much more, eating much less, sleeping much more, sleeping much less, etc.) can be a red flag and a time for you to get curious and ask more about what is going on with your kid.</p> <p>Psychologist Dr. Michele Borba recommends keeping a few questions in mind when you’re talking and listening with your young adult. Ask yourself: </p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>Does he seem to be adjusting?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does she have new friends?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does he seem happy?</p> </li> <li> <p>Are they joining in activities, like going to the gym or joining a club?</p> </li> <li> <p>Do they seem to have pride in their work or school? (For example, “<strong>Our</strong> team just got on a new project,” or “<strong>My</strong> school was listed as one of the top in the state.”)</p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>If you answer “yes” to these questions, it’s likely your teen is adjusting well, even if they say they’re stressed or sad. If they are showing no connections, or no interest in making new friends or getting involved, Dr. Borba says that is a “red flag” that there could be trouble ahead.</p> <p><strong>Acknowledge, Empathize, and Be Intentional</strong></p> <p>Ways to support your young adult are to acknowledge their feelings, empathize with them, and be intentional about the questions you ask. Often, when young adults reach out to parents in times of struggle, they’re looking for support or a shoulder to cry on. Dismissing their feelings or trying to fix their problems for them is a surefire way to end the conversation completely.</p> <p>For example, if your teen is feeling anxious or depressed, don’t dismiss those feelings by saying “That’s not something to be stressed about,” or “Everyone feels like that.” Similarly, trying to fix the problem also isn’t the answer. If your kid says they “don’t have any friends” don’t point out all the friends they had in high school, or their new coworker. It may be that they mean they don’t have the same strong friendships they used to have, which is something that can make them feel isolated or lonely.</p> <p>Instead, be intentional in your responses and turn the question or concern back to them. Dr. Wegner says this is a common tactic used by therapists to validate a patient’s concern, and empower them to find the answers themselves. You could try asking:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>“I’m sorry to hear you’re feeling that way. Why do you think that is?</p> </li> <li> <p>“It sounds like you don’t want to go to class, why is that?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“What do you think is going on?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“What have you tried to make you feel better?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“How can I help you?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“I’ve noticed X, how are you feeling about that?”</p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>Simply by listening, and allowing your young adult to come to conclusions on their own, you’re empowering them to understand more about their feelings and address them.</p> <p><strong>Let</strong> <strong>Your Kids Know It’s O.K. to Ask for Help</strong></p> <p>Asking for help, especially for mental health, is often stigmatized in America. But it doesn’t have to be. For college students, most counseling centers are a free resource that anyone can use. For young adults not enrolled in college, <a href="http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/parity-guide.aspx">most health insurance plans</a> also offer mental health coverage. So visits to a therapist or psychiatrist are often covered in some form. And as far as that stigma, Dr. Wegner says there shouldn’t be shame in asking for help if you need it, even if the situation isn’t dire.</p> <p>“People think it’s something you should only do if you’re clinically depressed and that’s not true,” Wegner says. “You don’t have to make a commitment, and you don’t have to go forever. Sometimes just a few sessions and then moving on can be helpful.”</p> <p>Dr. Green does a lot of outreach on campus to try and decrease stigma associated with getting help. In some cases, that can be recommending parents encourage students to seek help in any way that seems accessible to them. For example, if therapy seems to scary, parents can suggest their students to talk with their RA as a first step.</p> <p><strong>When to Get Professional Help</strong></p> <p>First and foremost, trust your gut instinct. Dr. Green reminds parents that “they know their kid the best.” Any drastic difference in behavior or temperament from what is normal for your young adult can be a sign that something more serious is happening.</p> <p>If your young adult talks about self-harm, suicide, or suicidal thoughts, do not avoid it. Try to find out if they mean they want to hurt themselves right now and, if so, seek immediate help by calling 9-1-1.</p> <p>If your young adult is drinking in excess or using other drugs to the point it is interfering with their ability to function normally, that’s also a time to seek professional help.</p> <p>For a small subset of the population that has psychotic disorders, young adulthood is often when symptoms start showing up. If your young adult is behaving erratically, having hallucinations, staying awake for extended periods of time, or sleeping for extend periods of time, seek professional help.</p> <p>For more help, try any of these resources:</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li> <p>National Suicide Prevention Life Line—call  1-800-273-8255 or visit <a href="http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/">http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Crisis Text Line – Text “Connect” to 741741 or visit <a href="http://www.crisistextline.org/">www.crisistextline.org</a> </p> </li> <li> <p>Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Locator – call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or visit: <a href="https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/">https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/</a></p> </li> </ul> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
BODYES <p>Las transiciones suelen ser un gran desafío para muchas familias. Ya sea que tu hijo vaya a ingresar a la escuela intermedia, secundaria, universidad o a empezar a trabajar tiempo completo, todo cambio importante en su vida traerá emociones encontradas. Sentirás mucho entusiasmo en un momento y al minuto siguiente te invadirá el miedo o el estrés. Eso es completamente normal, para ti y para tus hijos. Cuando un joven termina el secundario o la universidad, el futuro puede parecer abrumador.</p> <p>Como padre, tu rol en la vida de tus hijos va cambiando a medida que crecen, pero mantener una línea abierta de comunicación puede beneficiar a todos. Uno de esos beneficios está relacionado con la salud mental. Hablar con tus hijos sobre este tema puede tomar muchas formas, pero si tienes unas preguntas en mente y mantienes un diálogo abierto, puedes ayudar a que estas transiciones se atraviesen con más fluidez.</p> <p><strong>¿Qué es “normal”?</strong></p> <p>La psicóloga clínica Dra. Bobbi Wegner suele recibir a padres que le acercan inquietudes sobre la transición de sus hijos cuando comienzan o terminan la universidad. Ella nos cuenta que muchos jóvenes atraviesan ciertas dificultades en la adaptación, y es completamente normal. Pero muchas veces, tanto los jóvenes como sus padres no esperan que se presenten estas emociones, entonces cuando llegan, vienen acompañadas de una gran preocupación.</p> <p>“La ansiedad y la depresión son el equivalente a un resfrío en cuanto a salud mental, pero las personas no suelen hablar de ello”, relata Wegner. “Como padres, podemos ayudar controlando la ansiedad, y sentirse triste o deprimido puede ser una parte ‘normal’ de la experiencia”.</p> <p>En los tiempos de transición se atraviesan dificultades “normales” como mayor ansiedad, depresión y dificultades en las relaciones. Es posible que a los jóvenes les resulte difícil hacer amigos nuevos en el trabajo o en la escuela, y comiencen a sentirse solos o aislados. Una mayor carga de trabajo y de responsabilidades puede contribuir al estrés. Aceptar que esos sentimientos son válidos puede ser de gran ayuda.</p> <p><strong>Prepárate</strong></p> <p>La directora ejecutiva del Departamento de Asesoramiento y Servicios de Psicología de la UCLA, la Dra. Nicole Presley Green, les aconseja a los padres que sean proactivos antes de que haya un problema. Saber cuáles son los recursos disponibles en el campus, como centros de asesoramiento para estudiantes, es un gran paso para estar preparados. También, asegúrate de que tu hijo tenga toda la información de su seguro médico para que esté preparado en caso de que necesite atención en algún momento.</p> <p>Estar preparado también implica mantener una línea abierta de comunicación entre tú y tu hijo. Esto no significa que debas llamarlo varias veces en el día, simplemente dejarle en claro que te puede llamar o contactar siempre que lo necesite. Ten presente que estuviste a su lado la mayor parte de su vida; tú sabes lo que es normal para él.</p> <p>“Es un momento de gran desafío para los padres. No saben cuánto darles de libertad y cuánto de cierto control”, comenta la Dra. Green. “Pero sí saben cuándo su hijo está alcanzando un punto donde necesita ayuda”.</p> <p><strong>Explorar: </strong><a href="/advice-tips/physical-health-and-young-adults-a-parent-s-guide?lang=es">La salud física y los adultos jóvenes: una guía para padres</a></p> <p><strong>Identifica las señales de alerta</strong></p> <p>Como padre, escuchar que es “normal” podría no ser de mucha ayuda cuando te preocupa si tu hijo está pudiendo manejarse en su nuevo mundo. Por suerte, existen pautas que te ayudarán a identificar si está pasando algo más grave.</p> <p>La Dra. Wegner recomienda prestar especial atención a cambios notorios en su conducta, en tres categorías a las que llama la “trilogía sagrada de la salud”: descanso, alimentación y energía. Cualquier cambio significativo en alguna de estas áreas (comer demasiado, comer muy poco, dormir demasiado, dormir muy poco, etc.) puede representar una señal de alerta y un momento para despertar tu curiosidad y preguntar más para saber qué está ocurriendo con tu hijo.</p> <p>La psicóloga Dra. Michele Borba recomienda tener unas preguntas en mente cuando estás hablando con tu hijo. Pregúntate:</p> <ul> <li> <p>¿Parece que se está adaptando?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Tiene amigos nuevos?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Se lo ve feliz?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Está haciendo actividades, como ir al gimnasio o al club?</p> </li> <li> <p>¿Parece estar orgulloso de su trabajo o estudio? (Por ejemplo, “<strong>Nuestro</strong> equipo acaba de comenzar un proyecto nuevo” o “<strong>Mi</strong> escuela fue nombrada como una de las mejores del estado”). </p> </li> </ul> <p>Si puedes responder que “sí” a estas preguntas, es probable que tu hijo se esté adaptando bien aunque diga que está estresado o triste. Si notas que no está haciendo conexiones, o no está interesado en hacer amigos nuevos o en involucrarse, la Dra. Borba sostiene que se trata de una “señal de alerta” de futuros problemas.</p> <p><strong>Reconoce, empatiza y sé claro</strong></p> <p>Una forma de apoyar a tu hijo es reconocer sus sentimientos, empatizar con ellos y ser claro en las preguntas que le haces. Por lo general, cuando un joven se contacta con sus padres en un momento difícil es porque está buscando apoyo o un hombro donde pueda llorar. Desmerecer sus sentimientos o intentar resolver los problemas por ellos es una manera infalible de terminar la conversación por completo.</p> <p>Por ejemplo, si tu hijo se siente ansioso o deprimido, no desmerezcas esos sentimientos diciéndole: “no vale la pena que te estreses por eso” o “a todos les pasa lo mismo”. Del mismo modo, intentar solucionar el problema tampoco es la respuesta. Si tu hijo te dice que “no tiene amigos”, no saques a relucir todos los amigos que tuvo en el secundario o los nuevos compañeros de trabajo. Es posible que quiera decir que no tiene las mismas relaciones de amistad que solía tener, que es algo que puede hacerlo sentir aislado o solo.</p> <p>Por el contrario, sé claro en tus respuestas y devuélvele la pregunta o inquietud. La Dra. Wegner asegura que esta es una táctica frecuente de los terapeutas para validar la preocupación de un paciente, y habilitarlo a que encuentre la respuesta por sus propios medios. Puedes preguntar:</p> <ul> <li> <p>“Lamento saber que te sientes así. ¿A qué crees que se debe?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“Parece que no quieres ir a clase, ¿por qué te pasa eso?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Qué es lo que crees que está ocurriendo?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿Qué has intentado para sentirte mejor?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“¿En qué puedo ayudarte?”</p> </li> <li> <p>“Noté X cosa, ¿cómo te sientes al respecto?”</p> </li> </ul> <p>Simplemente escuchándolo y permitiendo que tu hijo llegue a una conclusión por sí solo, lo estarás ayudando a comprender mejor sus sentimientos y a ocuparse de ellos.</p> <p><strong>Diles que está bien pedir ayuda</strong></p> <p>Pedir ayuda, especialmente si tiene que ver con la salud mental, suele estar estigmatizado en Estados Unidos. Pero no tiene por qué ser así. Para los estudiantes universitarios, la mayoría de los centros de asesoramiento son gratuitos y cualquiera los puede usar. Para los adultos jóvenes no inscritos en la universidad, <a href="http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/parity-guide.aspx">la mayoría de los planes de seguro médico</a> también ofrecen cobertura de salud mental. Por lo tanto, las consultas con un terapeuta o un psiquiatra suelen estar cubiertas de alguna forma. Y con respecto a ese estigma, la Dra. Wegner aclara que nadie debería sentir vergüenza por pedir ayuda si la necesita, aun cuando la situación no sea extrema.  </p> <p>“Muchas personas creen que es algo que solo deberías hacer si sufres una depresión clínica, y eso no es cierto”, agrega Wegner. “No tienes que establecer un compromiso, o ir para siempre. A veces, unas pocas sesiones pueden ayudarte”.</p> <p>La Dra. Green hace trabajos en el campus para disminuir el estigma asociado con recibir ayuda. En algunos casos, se les recomienda a los padres que incentiven a los estudiantes a buscar ayuda por cualquier medio que les parezca accesible. Por ejemplo, si la idea de hacer terapia los asusta, los padres les pueden sugerir hablar con su asesor de residencia en primer lugar.</p> <p><strong>Cuándo solicitar ayuda de un profesional</strong></p> <p>Por sobre todas las cosas, confía en tu instinto. La Dra. Green les recuerda a los padres que “ellos son los que mejor conocen a su hijo”. Cualquier diferencia notoria en la conducta o en el temperamento de tu hijo puede ser la señal de que está ocurriendo algo más serio.</p> <p>Si tu hijo habla de provocarse un daño, de suicidio o de pensamientos suicidas, no lo evites. Intenta averiguar si esto implica que quieren dañarse ahora mismo y, de ser así, pide ayuda de inmediato llamando al 9-1-1.</p> <p>Si tu hijo está bebiendo en exceso o consumiendo drogas al punto de que llegue a interferir en su comportamiento habitual, también es hora de pedir ayuda de un profesional.</p> <p>Para una pequeña parte de la población que sufre trastornos psicóticos, los síntomas comienzan a manifestarse en la juventud. Si tu hijo se está comportando de manera errática, sufre alucinaciones, permanece despierto por largos períodos, o duerme demasiado, busca ayuda de un profesional.</p> <p>Para recibir más ayuda, prueba alguno de estos recursos:</p> <ul> <li> <p>National Suicide Prevention Life Line—llama al  1-800-273-8255 o visita <a href="http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/">http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Crisis Text Line – Envía la palabra “Connect” al 741741 o visita <a href="http://www.crisistextline.org/">www.crisistextline.org</a> </p> </li> <li> <p>Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Locator – llama al 1-800-662-HELP (4357) o visita: <a href="https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/">https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/</a></p> </li> </ul> <p> </p>
CATHTML F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB,F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D,2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
CMLABEL Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
CREATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
DATETIMECREATED 2017-04-06 18:33:04.0
DATETIMELASTUPDATED 2017-06-15 11:30:24.217
DESCRIPTION Talking with your children about mental health can be beneficial for everyone.
DESCRIPTIONES [empty string]
EMAILTEXT Thought you'd be interested in this guide to talking with your children about mental health.
EMAILTEXTES [empty string]
FACEBOOKTEXT Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.
FACEBOOKTEXTES [empty string]
HIDETEASERIMAGE 0
LABEL Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
LASTUPDATEDBY julianne_CLIENTUD
LEGACYOBJECTID [empty string]
LOCKED 0
LOCKEDBY [empty string]
OBJECTID FF5A9120-1B18-11E7-8CB20050569A4B6C
OWNEDBY 1106AA50-BC94-11E6-BA510050569A4B6C
PCOHORT F456CD77-5056-9A4B-6C0298B5B54862EB
PRIORITY .20
PSUBTOPIC 2B77D0BF-5056-9A4B-6C9EBCD5377DBA19
PTOPIC F45A89B7-5056-9A4B-6CFC8104253A1C5D
PUBLISHDATE 2017-04-06 01:00:00.0
SEOTITLE Young Adults and Mental Health
SEOTITLEES [empty string]
SHAREIMAGE [empty string]
SHORTTEASER [empty string]
SHORTTEASERES [empty string]
SHORTTITLE [empty string]
SHORTTITLEES [empty string]
SOCIALTITLE Young Adults and Mental Health
SOCIALTITLEES [empty string]
STATUS approved
SUBTITLE [empty string]
SUBTITLEES [empty string]
TEASER Talking with your kids about mental health can take many shapes and forms, but with a few questions in mind, and an open dialogue, you can help major transitions run a bit smoother.
TEASERES Las transiciones suelen ser un gran desafío para muchas familias.
TEASERIMAGE 4B5B8070-1952-11E7-89990050569A4B6C
TITLE Young Adults and Mental Health: A Guide for Parents
TITLEES Adultos jóvenes y salud mental: una guía para padres
TWITTERTEXT [empty string]
TWITTERTEXTES [empty string]
TWITTERTWEET Talking with your children about mental health can be beneficial for everyone. Learn more @educationnation.
TWITTERTWEETES [empty string]
TYPENAME cmAdviceArticle
VERSIONID [empty string]
aObjectIDs
array [empty]
afiles
array [empty]
authorObj
array [empty]
expertObj
array
1 F7935730-D79B-11E6-89870050569A5318
2 62155F50-2A8D-11E3-823F0050569A5318
3 496F0AF0-1EFE-11E7-A3C20050569A4B6C